Results for: united-mine-workers-of-america
100 S. Church Street
McComb

, OH

Organization of the congregation began in 1848 under the Rev. George Van Eman, and a charter was granted in 1854. The oldest Presbyterian church building in continuous use in Hancock County, the sanctuary was constructed in 1855-56. Members of the congregation included first Congressional Medal of Honor recipients John R. Porter and William Bennsinger, honored for their exploits as members of Andrews Raiders during the Civil War.

365 West Market Street
Orrville

, OH

Orrville was founded in 1852 at the railroad crossing that would later serve the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago and the Columbus, Mount Vernon and Cleveland railroads. The town was named in honor of Judge Smith Orr, who was instrumental in bringing the railroad to Wayne County. Orr persuaded landowner Robert Taggart to partition ten acres into town lots. After buying out the land owned by fellow settlers Christian Horst, David Rudy, and Peter Perrine, Orr engaged Jesse Straughan to create the first plat map that centered the newly-formed town on the railroad crossing. Incorporated on May 9, 1864, Orrville prospered and attracted manufactories of all kinds. Orrville was the largest manufacturing town in Wayne County by 1873.

6520 Main St SE
Rendville

, OH

Established in 1879 by Chicago industrialist William P. Rend as a coal mining town, Rendville became a place where African Americans broke the color barrier. In 1888, Dr. Isaiah Tuppins, the first African American to receive a medical degree in Ohio, was elected Rendville’s mayor, also making him the first African American to be elected a mayor in Ohio. Richard L. Davis arrived in Rendville in 1882 and became active in the Knights of Labor. He was one of the labor organizers from the Little Cities of Black Diamonds region who helped found the United Mine Workers of America in 1890. An outstanding writer and orator, Davis was elected to UMWA’s national executive board and organized thousands of African Americans and immigrants to join the union. (continued on other side)

Treaty Line Rd & Hoover Moffitt Rd
West Mansfield

, OH

The Treaty of Greeneville created the Greeneville Treaty Line. It was the boundary between lands in the original possession of the Indians and those they ceded to the United States, which were south and east of the boundary. Major General “Mad” Anthony Wayne negotiated the treaty with the tribes his army defeated at the Battle of Fallen Timbers on August 20, 1794. Leaders of 12 tribes, including Wyandots, Delawares, Shawnees, Ottawas, and Miamis, signed the Treaty of Greeneville on August 3, 1795 with General Wayne, William Henry Harrison, and other representatives of the United States. Treaties that followed Greeneville up to the Treaty with the Miamis in 1818 extinguished the various tribes’ original claims and created Indian reservations on the lands northwest of the Greeneville Treaty Line, making it obsolete. (Continued on other side)

63 North Paint Street
Chillicothe

, OH

To provide direction and stability to the economy, Congress created the nation’s largest lending agency in 1816, the Second Bank of the United States. Branch banks were established around the country, two of them in Ohio-Chillicothe and Cincinnati. The Chillicothe branch was located in a building on this site. The presence of these branches adversely affected the ability of state chartered and independent banks, which had long printed and lent their own money without the backing of species. When the Secretary of Treasury forced the state chartered and independent banks to redeem their notes in specie, at a time when a sharp recession hit the nation in 1819, a wave of protest arose from those connected with those banks. In February 1819, Ohio’s General Assembly levied a tax of $50,000 on each of the two branch banks, and bank officers were given until September 1 to comply with the law. (continued on other side)

119 W. Elder Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The United States’ declaration of war on Germany in April 1917 resulted in a tragic display of hysteria directed against everything and anything German. In Cincinnati, German teachers were dismissed from public schools, German professors were censored, German collections and publications were removed from circulation at the Public Library, businesses with German names had their names “Americanized” and, by police order, only English language public meetings could be held. (Continued on other side)

55 Main Street
Tarlton

, OH

Major General William Sooy Smith was born in Tarlton on July 22, 1830. He attended Ohio University and supported himself throughout his college undergraduate career, graduating in 1849. He then entered the United States Military Academy at West Point to pursue engineering and graduated 6th in the class of 1853. In 1857, Smith established the private engineering firm Parkinson & Smith and made the first surveys for the international bridge across the Niagara River near Niagara Falls. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Smith joined the 13th Ohio Infantry, winning the commission of colonel in June 1861. After early victories in western Virginia, he was promoted to brigadier general in April 1862 for his gallant and meritorious service at the Battle of Shilo. (continued on other side)

1225 Mount Vernon Avenue
Marion

, OH

The Marion Mausoleum represents a time in early 20th-century America in which burial practices changed because of advances in engineering and construction materials, concerns about hygiene, and a new rise in wealth among the middle class. Exhibiting elements of the Neo-Classical Revival and Prairie architectural styles, construction of the sandstone building began in 1906. The mausoleum opened to the public in 1916. The interior is comprised of marble and concrete. Furnishings include chandeliers, wool carpeting, and wrought iron furniture. Stained-glass windows admit natural light. Two windows feature an upside-down torch with a still-burning flame, which symbolizes a belief in eternal spiritual life after death and burial. The mausoleum has space for 383 internments. As of 2016, it is supported and maintained by a perpetual care fund.