Results for: united-mine-workers-of-america
Columbiana

, OH

Birthplace on December 20, 1868 of Harvey S. Firestone, founder of The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. One of the first brick houses in Columbiana County, it was built in 1828 by Harvey S. Firestone’s great-grandfather, Nicholas Firestone, who acquired title to 640 acres in 1804 by a land grant signed by Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States, and James Madison, Secretary of State.

5921 Cox Road
Bucyrus

, OH

Long known to the Indians for the mineral spring water, this land was purchased in 1819 by Samuel Knisley. After 1880 it was developed as a resort area by Dr. Jerome Bland, who also established a cattle and horse breeding farm. In 1930 the land became part of PICKWICK FARMS which in 1976 was the largest standardbred breeding farm in Ohio and known throughout the United States and Canada.

W. Gay Street
Somerset

, OH

Lutheran congregations formed in Perry County beginning in the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century. The Mother Synod, the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania, sent missionary pastors to Ohio to preach to the growing number of Lutherans moving into the state. St. Paul congregation was formed in 1812 under the leadership of William Forester. On September 14, 1818, the Joint Synod of Ohio, the first synodical organization of Lutherans west of the Appalachian Mountains and one of the earliest predecessors of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, was founded in Somerset at the original log church on this site. St. Paul’s current church on W. Main was constructed in 1844.

27722 OH 424, Independence Dam State Park
Defiance

, OH

Camp No. 3 was located about six miles below Fort Winchester on the north side of the Maumee River. Militiamen from Kentucky, part of the forces led by War of 1812 Brig. Gen. James Winchester, occupied the camp from November 1812 until December 30, 1812. They had marched off to war in summer wearing their linen clothing; unaware they would end up in the heart of the Black Swamp in mid-winter. The suffering they endured was intense. Camp No. 3, thought to cover an area of about 40 acres, had picketed walls and an earthen bastion at each corner. The soldiers built small huts for shelter. In his diary, Pvt. Elias Darnell of Lewis’ Regiment of Kentucky volunteers referred to Camp No. 3 as “Fort Starvation.”

SE corner of Lincoln Highway and Pollock Road
Convoy

, OH

This is the gravesite of Robert Nesbitt, an immigrant from Convoy, Ireland who named Convoy, Ohio after his home town. In 2010, the Convoy Community Foundation, Convoy Lions Club, Convoy Business Association, and Convoy Community Days, Inc. raised the funds to restore Nesbitt’s tombstone. A representative from Convoy, Ireland – Ray Bonar – attended the rededication ceremony on July 4, 2010. The Van Wert County Historical Society took over the care of the grave site, which is in the Sugar Ridge Cemetery. The cemetery has been under the care of the Tully Township Trustees since its foundation.

50 Park Avenue E
Mansfield

, OH

Born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, John Sherman moved to Mansfield to practice law and was elected to Congress in 1854 as one of the first Republicans. In 1861, Sherman was elected to the U.S. Senate. An authority on finance, Sherman was instrumental in shaping federal financial policy in the years following the Civil War, and President Rutherford Hayes appointed him Secretary of the Treasury in 1877. During the “Greenback” debate, he re-implemented the gold standard, stabilizing the currency during an inflationary period. Sherman returned to the Senate in 1881 and served until early 1897 when President McKinley appointed him Secretary of State; in declining health, he resigned in 1898. He died in Washington, D.C. and is interred in the Mansfield Cemetery.

101 S Main St
New Knoxville

, OH

The history of New Knoxville provides one of the best examples of chain migration to America. After the Shawnee were removed from what would become Auglaize County, James Knox Lytle, cousin to James Knox Polk, purchased land in Washington Township. Lytle platted a village of 102 lots in 1836, calling it Knoxville to honor his mother’s family. Meanwhile, newly married Wilhelm and Elisabeth Fledderjohann Kuckhermann (later Kuck) immigrated from Ladbergen in northwest Germany. Having missed their boat to St. Louis, the couple lived briefly in Stallostown (Minster) and Bremen (New Bremen). They wrote home, encouraging others to emigrate; in the summer of 1835 the Fledderjohanns (Elisabeth’s family), Meckstroths, and Lutterbecks arrived. The families bought land near the site of Knoxville. (continued on other side)

Camp Sherman Memorial Park, SR 104
Chillicothe

, OH

The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917. Largely through the efforts of Chillicothe attorney John Poland, the War Department selected Chillicothe as the site of an army training camp for inductees from Ohio, West Virginia, and western Pennsylvania. Construction began at Camp Sherman, named for Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman, in June 1917. When the first recruits arrived in September, more than fourteen thousand workers had erected two thousand buildings on the 1,700-acre site. The rapid influx of soldiers increased Chillicothe’s population from 16,000 to 60,000.