Remarkable Ohio

Results for: western-indian-wars
391 Mahoning Avenue
Warren

, OH

This ornate Victorian/Italianate house was constructed in 1871 as the home of Henry Bishop Perkins, Sr., a civic, business, and political leader of the Western Reserve. During the 19th and early 20th century political figures such as U.S. Grant, James A. Garfield, Rutherford B. Hayes, Benjamin Harrison and William McKinley were visitors to this house.

Near 3119 Prairie Road
Wilmington

, OH

Near this site in October 1786 General Benjamin Logan with an army of 700 Kentucky volunteers camped on their way to destroy seven Indian towns in the Mad River Valley. During the night a renegade deserted the camp to warn the Indians. The army burned 200 cabins and 15,000 bushels of corn before returning. Later this site became an important survey point.

23253 SR-83
Coshocton

, OH

Lt. Col. Henry Bouquet with 1500 British regulars and American militia penetrated the Ohio wilderness to crush Chief Pontiac’s Indian conspiracy. Here at the forks of the Muskingum River during October and November, Bouquet subdued the Delawares, Senecas, and Shawnee without firing a shot, secured the freedom of every colonial captive, and obtained promises of peace–a feat unequaled in colonial American history.

3518 St. Lawrence Drive
Toledo

, OH

Near this site scout Peter Navarre built in 1807 a log cabin close by an Ottawa Indian Village of 60 whitewashed cabins. Here he maintained friendly relations between white settlers and Chief Autokee. The 1833 Treaty of Maumee gave 320 acres of this region to the Indians who later sold the isle for $1,000. Presque Isle is now at the heart of Port of Toledo activity.

7983 S Wiswell Road
Windsor

, OH

The prehistoric Erie Indians built a fortification across this neck of land sometime before 1650. A low wall is all that remains today of a stockade where earth had been piled at the base of posts. The stockade and the naturally steep embankments of the ridge provided a safe location for an Indian village.

Fort Amanda State Memorial, OH 198, 1/4 mile S of Ft. Amanda Road, Lima
Lima

, OH

After Gen. William Hull’s surrender at Detroit early in the War of 1812, most of the Michigan Territory came under British and Indian control. To prevent a possible invasion of Ohio, Gen. William Henry Harrison, commander of the Northwestern Army, called up the Kentucky and Ohio militia. Rather than moving troops and supplies across the Black Swamp, he chose to use the Auglaize and St. Marys rivers. In November 1812 Harrison ordered Lt. Col. Robert Pogue of the Kentucky Mounted Militia to construct a supply depot at this site, previously an Ottawa village. Pogue, a veteran of the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, named the post Fort Amanda after his 12-year-old daughter, Hannah Amanda. (continued on other side)

New Philadelphia

, OH

Here, on April 10, 1779 during the Revolutionary War, David Zeisberger founded one of the five Delaware Christian missions to occupy the Tuscarawas Valley between May 3, 1772 and September 8, 1781. Living at the Lichtenau mission near the Delaware capital of Goschachgunk (presently Coshocton, Ohio), Zeisberger feared that the Delaware nation was about to break their neutrality and join the British led Indians. Accordingly, he decided to disperse his Christian congregation and move his converts thirty-five miles up river to a place of safety in this large alluvial plain adjacent to the Tuscarawas River.

N Hine Circle
Poland

, OH

Born at Wallingford, Connecticut. Served during the Revolutionary War. Proprietor, Agent, and Surveyor of the Connecticut Land Company. Appointed Judge of Trumbull County by Territorial Governor Arthur St. Clair, 1800. State Senator, Trumbull County, 1815-1816. Poland Justice of the Peace, twenty years. Moderator of St. James Episcopal Church, Boardman, 1809. First Worshipful Master of Erie Lodge No. 47, Warren, 1803, oldest lodge in the Connecticut Western Reserve and one of six lodges to form the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ohio, 1809.