Remarkable Ohio

Results for: historic
Oberlin

, OH

Shortly after Oberlin Colony was established in 1833, a two-acre burying ground was set aside south of Plum Creek in the area bounded by Main, Morgan, and Professor streets. By 1861, however, with the town and Oberlin College growing and the Civil War escalating, the need for a larger cemetery became clear. After an extensive search, 27.5 acres of land belonging to Henry Safford were acquired one mile west of the center of Oberlin. H.B. Allen was hired to create a design in the style of the Rural Cemetery Movement, and in July 1864 Westwood Cemetery was formally dedicated. Burials in Westwood had actually begun in August 1863, and over the next few years hundreds of remains were reinterred from Oberlin’s “Old Cemetery” and from burying grounds in surrounding communities. In the mid-1860s the cemetery was enlarged to its present 47 acres, and in 2004 burials and memorials were estimated to number almost ten thousand. (Continued on other side)

316 Pike Street
Cincinnati

, OH

This Federal house was begun about 1820 for Martin Baum (1765-1831), one of Cincinnati’s early merchants. Art patron and abolitionist Nicholas Longworth (1782-1863) lived here for more than thirty years and commissioned the notable landscape murals in the foyer painted by African-American artist Robert S. Duncanson (1821-1872). Iron magnate David Sinton (1808-1900), the subsequent owner, bequeathed the house to his daughter Anna Sinton Taft (1852?-1931). She and her husband Charles Phelps Taft (1843-1929), older half-brother of William Howard Taft (1857-1930), who accepted his party’s nomination for president from the portico in 1908, assembled the acclaimed art collection displayed here. Bequeathed to the people of Cincinnati in 1927, the Taft Museum of Art opened to the public in 1932. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1973.

Circle Drive
Fowler

, OH

Originally called Westfield Township, Samuel Fowler purchased this area in 1798 from the Connecticut Land Company for $12,903.23 while living in Westfield, Massachusetts. His brother Abner arrived the following year to survey the land and separate it into smaller plots that could be sold to people wanting to settle here. A Revolutionary War veteran, Abner was the first to arrive here and also the first recorded death in 1806, the same year that his son Abner Fowler II married the first school teacher in Fowler Ester Jennings. In 1817, Samuel Fowler gave five acres of land to Fowler Center to be used as a park or “common” with the provision that no permanent building ever be built on it. At about the same time, the township name was changed to Fowler to honor its founding family. Agriculture was and remains the main occupation in the Fowler area.

42 N. Main Street
Mechanicsburg

, OH

The Mechanicsburg United Methodist congregation was founded in the early nineteenth century and met first in open-air camp meetings before moving into a small log school building. In 1820 the congregation built a wood framed church on East Sandusky Street and that building was replaced with a brick structure in 1838. The congregation split in 1853 into Trinity Methodist and First Methodist with both groups serving the village of Mechanicsburg for 103 years before coming back together in 1956. The current United Methodist Church was built in the early 1890s and dedicated in 1894 on the corner of Main and Race Streets. The Gothic Revival style church was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

969 Riverside Drive
Painesville

, OH

Built in 1819, this classic Greek Revival style colonial is attributed to the works of master builder and architect Jonathon Goldsmith. Goldsmith is known for his simple, yet elegant craftsmanship and architectural designs, especially the unique front doorways that are signatures of his creations. The house reveals original detailed woodwork and a functional floor plan. It was constructed for Uri Seeley, one of the earliest settlers of Lake County. Seeley and his family were dedicated to the anti-slavery movement and used this residence as a stop for travelers on the Underground Railroad. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Oberlin

, OH

The intersection of Main and College streets has been the center of Oberlin since the town and college were founded in 1833. The first downtown buildings were made of wood and were destroyed by a series of spectacular fires. The first college building, Oberlin Hall, stood on the southwest corner of College and Main and included recitation rooms, a dining hall, chapel, offices, and lodging. In 1887, Akron architect Frank Weary designed the large brick building at numbers 5 to 13 West College. Number 23 West College (Gibson Block) once housed a silent movie theater on the second floor. East College Street’s historic buildings include the Apollo Theater, which showed Oberlin’s first talking movie on May 11, 1928. From 1897 to 1929, an interurban streetcar line connected Oberlin’s downtown to Cleveland. Oberlin’s downtown historic district was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

131 Oakdale Avenue
Akron

, OH

Akron, an industrial boomtown in the early twentieth century, grew in population nearly fivefold between 1900 and 1920. As the city industrialized, middle class residents sought homes on West Hill, away from the smoke and soot of heavy industry on the East Side. The Hall Park Allotment Historic District in West Hill represents a notable early twentieth century neighborhood. Developed by Philander Hall between 1902 and 1919 during the height of Akron’s “rubber boom,” it consists of several houses representing the picturesque styles of the period, including the American Foursquare, Craftsman, Colonial, and Medieval Revival Styles. With its gently curving brick streets, hilly topography, and mature trees, the Hall Park Allotment Historic District evokes the feeling of a distinct period of time in Akron’s history and constitutes a neighborhood of distinctive historical character and architectural merit.

‘5765 E Walnut Grove Rd-Clark County Road
Troy

, OH

Elizabeth Township was founded in 1807. The Elizabeth Township House was built about 1870, serving as the community’s assembly hall. The building is similar to the seven remaining one-room, brick schoolhouses, built throughout the township between 1868 and 1873. In 1997, the township was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Ohio’s first rural historic district. The district includes all of Elizabeth Township and parts of Staunton and Bethel townships. This marker erected to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the township’s founding.