Results for: the-lorain-cleveland-railway
99 W Canal Street
Nelsonville

, OH

The arrival of the Columbus and Hocking Valley Railroad in 1869 led to the decline of the Hocking Canal and assured Nelsonville’s prominence as a major shipping point of coal and industrial products. The portion of the railway from Logan in Nelsonville was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988, along with steam locomotive #33 and caboose #90704.

129 Main Street
Chardon

, OH

Chardon was designated the county seat of Geauga County in 1808. On July 25, 1868, the entire village business district (now Main Street) was destroyed by fire, including forty businesses, offices, meeting halls, and the 1824 courthouse. Citizens immediately rallied and formed the Chardon Building Company. In August 1868 they contracted with Herrick and Simmons of Cleveland to build the Union Block using fire-resistant brick. This was one of Rensselaer R. Herrick’s (Cleveland Mayor 1879-1882) last construction jobs. The Union Block occupies the northern half of this block of Main Street. (Continued on other side)

Massillon vicinity

, OH

Sounds of boat horns and brawling packet crews resounded for many years at this lock and 142 others on the Ohio and Erie Canal. The canal was a 308-mile water toll road built between 1825 and 1832 from Lake Erie at Cleveland to the Ohio River at Portsmouth. The early growth of Akron and Massillon was due to the canal. Railroads caused its decline and the flood of 1913 destroyed its usefulness.

S. Main St.
Magnetic Springs

, OH

Near this site in 1879, J.E. Newhouse discovered a magnetic spring in his park, Green Bend Gardens. It was found that a knife blade dipped in the water could pick up small metal objects like a magnet. The spring became known for its curative powers and was advertised as a treatment for ailments including rheumatism, gout, insomnia, and diseases of the kidneys, bladder, and nerves. To share the health-giving water, Mr. Newhouse opened the Magnetic Bath House, which became famous for its water cures. To reach a larger market, the magnetic water was sterilized and bottled and sold under the Magnetic Springs label. Advances in medicine after World War II led to the decline in the popularity of mineral baths.

125 East Broad Street
Elyria

, OH

The nation-wide Easter Seal movement, first major voluntary effort to provide treatment for the crippled, was founded on this site with the organization of the Ohio Society for Crippled Children by Edgar F. (Daddy) Allen, April 22, 1919.

219 E. Market Street
Lima

, OH

In 1910, the Ohio Electric Railway Company opened this terminal, formerly the Interurban Building, which served interurban passengers until 1937. Along with offices, it contained space for express and baggage handling, ticket windows, a newsstand, a lunch counter, and waiting rooms. Three tracks were laid at the rear of the building. At its peak, Ohio Electric radiated from Lima to Springfield, Toledo (via Ottawa), Defiance, and Fort Wayne. Its competitor, The Western Ohio Railway (“Lima Route”) connected Dayton and Toledo (via Findlay). The interurban network in and around Lima led to the creation of suburbs, linked industrial and residential areas, and promoted the creation of amusement parks and small lake resorts. With decreased passenger traffic due in part to personal automobiles and the Great Depression, the interurban and street railway era in Lima ended in 1939, 52 years after it had begun as Ohio’s first successful electric streetcar system.

5501 E. Lake Road
Sheffield Lake

, OH

The 103rd O.V.I. was recruited for Civil War service from Cuyahoga, Lorain, and Medina counties. The Regiment was organized at Cleveland in August, 1862, and served until 1865 in campaigns at Cincinnati, Knoxville, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and the Carolinas.103rd O.V.I. veterans and their descendants have held continuous, annual reunions since 1866. The organization is believed to be unique in the nation. Descendants live on these grounds today.

4520 County Hwy 229
Fredericksburg

, OH

This area, known as Calmoutier, was an early French Catholic farming community founded in 1832 by Claude Druhot, who came from Calmoutier, Hte-Saône, France. Its first native, the four-month-old Claude Joseph Druhot, was baptized on 9 June 1833 by Fr. John Henni, who resided at St. John’s in Canton (and in 1854 became Milwaukee’s first bishop). In 1836 Fr. John Alleman, O.P., established St. Genevieve’s Mission (when it began to keep its own records) on land donated by the Pierson and Roussel families. The log chapel that was built (the first of four churches here) predated any Catholic church building in Cleveland, Akron, and Toledo.