Results for: counseling-service
100 Public Square
Somerset

, OH

The Sheridan monument was erected by and given to the Village of Somerset by the State of Ohio in 1905 to honor the memory of Somerset’s General Phillip Henry Sheridan. “Little Phil” was raised in Somerset and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1852. He rendered valuable service to the Federal Army in the Civil War at Stone’s River, Missionary Ridge, Yellow Tavern, Winchester, Cedar Creek, Five Forks, and Appomattox. He later commanded in the West and became General of the Army in 1883, received his fourth star, and died in 1888. The heroic sculpture, created by Carl Heber of New York, portrays “Sheridan’s Ride” to Winchester. Somerset citizens paid for the granite base through a children’s “penny fund.”

15 S Lisbon St
Carrollton

, OH

Major Daniel McCook of Carrollton and his 9 sons and their cousins, the 5 sons of Dr. John McCook of Steubenville, won popular acclaim for their outstanding service in the United States Army and Navy. “Tribe of Dan” Maj. Daniel: mortally wounded at Buffington Island. Maj. Latimer: a surgeon. Brig. Gen. George: early regimental commander. Midshipman John: died at sea. Brig Gen. Robert: murdered by guerrillas. Maj. Gen. Alexander: commander of the 20th Corps. Brig. Gen. Daniel Jr. mortally wounded at Kenesaw Mt. Maj. Gen. Edwin: served under Grant and Sherman. Pvt. Charles: killed at Bull Run. Col. John: seriously wounded in Virginia.

501 N. Main Street
Malta

, OH

Prisoners convicted of rioting, larceny and adultery in Morgan County between 1833 and 1839 were confined to a dungeon near the Court House in McConnelsville. This stone vault, 11 feet high, 5 feet wide and 12 feet long, was discovered in 1964 and is believed to have been used as the county dungeon. The Morgan County Pomona Grange #81 in co-operation with the County Commissioners and the County Agricultural Society reconstructed the structure on this site in 1965 as a community service project.

12 N. Diamond Street
Mansfield

, OH

Oldest Religious Congregation in north-central Ohio. First Methodist Sermon preached at the “spring” in 1809 by Rev. James Copus. Services then conducted in blockhouse, 1811; in first court house, 1813; at church home of Dr. William B. James, 1814; first church building located N.W. corner Park Avenue East and Adams, 1820; present site in 1870. All land donated by General James Hedges, a distinguished member.

New Philadelphia

, OH

Here, on April 10, 1779 during the Revolutionary War, David Zeisberger founded one of the five Delaware Christian missions to occupy the Tuscarawas Valley between May 3, 1772 and September 8, 1781. Living at the Lichtenau mission near the Delaware capital of Goschachgunk (presently Coshocton, Ohio), Zeisberger feared that the Delaware nation was about to break their neutrality and join the British led Indians. Accordingly, he decided to disperse his Christian congregation and move his converts thirty-five miles up river to a place of safety in this large alluvial plain adjacent to the Tuscarawas River.

7461 Old US 24
Liberty Center

, OH

In 1742, a tribe of Kickapoo requested permission from Montreal’s Governor to move to a Mascoutin village on both sides of the river here. French “Coureurs de Bois” traders named the wide floodplain “La Prairie des Mascoutins” (The Meadow of the Mascoutin). In 1764, Captain Thomas Morris explored this newly acquired British territory, and met the prophetic dreamer Chief Katapelleecy here. General Anthony Wayne’s troops victoriously returned from The Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 and burned “Prairie de Masque.” The Treaty of Detroit in 1807 created a hunting reservation to the east, allowing settlers to acquire the surrounding lands. Ethnic tensions climaxed in 1812, when an American Captain Logan was mortally wounded near here. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 caused the remaining tribes to move west.

Intersection of S. Sandusky Street & Olentangy Avenue
Delaware

, OH

Near this site, the Union army established two camps on either side of the Olentangy River during the Civil War. Both were known as Camp Delaware. The first camp, situated on the west side of the river in the summer of 1862, was where the white recruits of the 96th and 121st regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry were mustered into service. A second camp, on the east side of the Olentangy, was established in the summer of 1863 and became the rendezvous point for most African-American Ohioans joining the army. The 127th Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry-later renamed the 5th Regiment United States Colored Troops, the 27th U.S. Colored Troops, and members of other African-American units were mustered into service at Camp Delaware.

5501 E. Lake Road
Sheffield Lake

, OH

The 103rd O.V.I. was recruited for Civil War service from Cuyahoga, Lorain, and Medina counties. The Regiment was organized at Cleveland in August, 1862, and served until 1865 in campaigns at Cincinnati, Knoxville, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and the Carolinas.103rd O.V.I. veterans and their descendants have held continuous, annual reunions since 1866. The organization is believed to be unique in the nation. Descendants live on these grounds today.