Remarkable Ohio

Results for: counseling-service
3599 Herr Fieldhouse Rd
Southington

, OH

A newer use for the airplanes after World War I was mail delivery. Airplanes moved mail faster than trains, but flying only during daylight hours slowed delivery and flying at night was dangerous. The Army Air Service constructed an experimental lighted beacon route for night flying between Columbus and Dayton in 1923. With proof that such a system could work, the U.S. Postal Service developed what later enthusiasts call a “highway of light” to guide air mail pilots on the transcontinental routes between New York to San Francisco and across the nation. (Continued on other side)

714 North Portage Path
Akron

, OH

Completed in 1915, the Gate Lodge is one of several service buildings located at Stan Hywet Hall dedicated to the operations of the estate. Located at the front entrance gates, this two-story Tudor Revival structure was designed by the Seiberlings’ architect Charles S. Schneider. Originally, the Gate Lodge served as a residence for the estate’s superintendent. The first to fill this role was William Dennis who moved in with his family to the Gate Lodge after its completion and resided there until his death in 1923. Between 1923 and 1944, Fred, the eldest child of F.A. and Gertrude Seiberling, lived in the Gate Lodge with his wife Henrietta and their three children. In 1935, Henrietta brought here the two men who would formally found Alcoholics Anonymous, Bill Wilson of New York and Dr. Bob Smith of Akron.

Blacklick Street
Groveport

, OH

The Ohio and Erie Canal was Ohio’s solution to the lack of a reliable and fast transportation system to move goods to outside markets. The canal opened in the then unplatted village of Groveport on September 25, 1831 and contributed directly to Groveport’s success as a center of commerce. W.H. Richardson built lock 22, the only lock in Groveport, as part of his bid to build section 52 of the canal. Lock 22, the last lock before a series of locks in Lockbourne, Ohio that lower the canal to the level of Big Walnut Creek, is 90 feet long with a 15 foot wide lock channel. A variety of businesses clustered along the banks of the canal. In the mid-nineteenth century, a canal boatyard and dry dock was operated in what is now Blacklick Park. Canal boats were built and repaired in this facility that was considered the first notable such operation on the canal below Baltimore, Ohio.

Butler County Regional Airport – Hogan Field, 2820 East Airport Drive
Hamilton

, OH

The Hogan Family owned and operated what was known as the Hamilton Airport for over 52 years. Airplane owner and pilot, Carl “Pop” Muhlberger and aviation enthusiast and farmer, Joe Hogan, co-founded the airport in July 1929. Muhlberger taught Joe to fly and in return, Joe managed and maintained the field. During the Great Depression, Muhlberger could not afford to operate the airport, closing in July 1932. With financial backing from Joe’s older brother, Charles, and their father, William, the family purchased and reopened the airport. Running the airport was a family affair. Joe taught his brothers, Bill, Bernie, and Art to fly. They raised money to run the airport by barnstorming, sightseeing flights, and flying lessons. Sisters, Mary Ann, Katie, and Loretta (Sauer), also flew. They, along with their mother Emma, helped run the airport and its restaurant. (Continued on other side)

112 West Commerce Street
Youngstown

, OH

The Erie Terminal Building, constructed 1921-1922, serviced both the Erie and Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railways and area commerce. The design, by Swiss-born, Youngstown architect Paul Boucherle (1882-1966), is in the Commercial Style with simple classical details. The six-story building housed a passenger railroad station on the first floor and Erie Railway offices on the fifth and sixth floors. A one-story commercial bay faced Commerce Street and was the home of the International Bank and later the Morris Plan Bank. The widening of Commerce Street removed the bay in 1939. Once named the Hamory Building for its financial backer, Gustave Hamory, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986 and renovated in 2012, creating apartments in the upper floors and restoring the first-story railway spaces.

2038 Auburn Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Born here on September 15, 1857, William Howard Taft is the only American to have served as President and Chief Justice of the United States. His unique career of public service began after he graduated from Yale University and Cincinnati Law School. He became an Ohio Superior Court Judge at age 29. In 1892, he was appointed a judge of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1900, President William McKinley sent him to the Philippines as chief civil administrator. President Theodore Roosevelt named him Secretary of War in 1904, and he was elected president of the United States four years later. In 1921, President Harding named Taft Chief Justice, a position that he relished, serving until just before his death in 1930.

250 yards south of 23 Washington Street
North Bend

, OH

William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), ninth president of the United States, left his home state of Virginia in 1791 and was commissioned in the 1st Regiment of Infantry. After his resignation from the army, he became Secretary of the Northwest Territory. In 1801, Harrison became governor of the recently created Indiana Territory. During the War of 1812, he was given command of the Army of the Northwest, defeating combined British and Native American forces at the Battle of the Thames. Harrison lived here following the War of 1812. He turned to politics while living in North Bend and represented Ohio in the United States Congress for two terms. In the presidential election of 1840, the Whigs capitalized on Harrison’s fame as a military hero and nominated him to run against incumbent Democrat Martin Van Buren. Shortly after his lengthy inaugural address, Harrison developed pneumonia. He died on April 4, 1841, and his body was returned to North Bend for burial.

4933 Cleves Warsaw Pike
Cincinnati

, OH

Born in Richmond, Virginia, Powhatan Beaty moved to Cincinnati in 1849, where he spent the majority of his life. Beaty enlisted as a private in the Union Army in June 1863, and two days later was promoted to first sergeant, Company G, 5th United States Colored Troops (USCT). All the officers of Company G were killed or wounded during an attack on Confederate forces at New Market Heights, Virginia, in September 1864. Beaty took command of his company, and for his valor received the Congressional Medal of Honor. Beaty was one of two African-Americans buried in Ohio to receive the Medal of Honor for service in the Civil War. He died on December 6, 1916, leaving two sons, attorney and state representative A. Lee Beaty and John W. Beaty. He is buried in Union Baptist Cemetery along with nearly 150 USCT veterans.