Remarkable Ohio

Results for: counseling-service
14737 West Garfield Road
Salem

, OH

Maple-Dell was the home of John Butler, a Quaker who expressed his religious faith by working for humanitarian causes. An early Goshen Township teacher, Butler opened his home to orphans, the homeless, and runaway slaves, and devoted 20 years of his life to support the Freedman’s Camps for former slaves. One of the many individuals he sheltered was Edwin Coppock who was hung along with abolitionist, John Brown, after the raid on Harper’s Ferry in 1859. Butler met with President Lincoln and Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton in 1862 to request exemption from military service for Quakers during the Civil War. In 1868, President Grant petitioned the churches to assist in organizing a peace policy for the Indians. Butler prepared and presented to Congress a proposal for treating the Indians humanely including providing them with scientific and industrial education.

Ritter Park, West Riverview Ave
Napoleon

, OH

Camp Latty was located at the corner of Riverview and Glenwood Avenues in Napoleon, Ohio and included Glenwood Cemetery in its grounds. This camp was named for Judge Alexander S. Latty, a staunch supporter of the Union. From October to December 1861 the 68th Regiment was organized. The 68th Regiment then took part in the Battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, the Siege of Corinth, the Battles of Hatchies’s Bridge, Port Gibson, Raymond, Champion Hill, the Siege of Vicksburg, the Meridian Campaign, the Atlanta Campaign, the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, the Battle of Atlanta, the Siege of Atlanta, the Battle of Jonesboro, Sherman’s March to the Sea, the Carolinas Campaign, the Battle of Bentonville, the Surrender of Johnston’s Army, and the Grand Review in Washington, D.C. The 68th Regiment served in every Confederate State except Florida and Texas. (Continued on other side)

414 N. Detroit Street
West Liberty

, OH

The West Liberty area, in the Mad River Valley, was the location of at least seven Shawnee Indian villages. This elevated site was the location of one of those villages. Several septs or divisions of the Shawnee nation lived in this area after being forced from their homes in southern Ohio. In 1786, together with Simon Kenton, Colonel Benjamin Logan’s army destroyed all the Shawnee villages in retaliation for the Indian raids in southern Ohio and Kentucky. Consequently, the remaining Shawnees moved to northwest Ohio near the present-day site of Maumee.

101 S. Main Street
Bellefontaine

, OH

Judge William H. West of Bellefontaine led a distinguished career in law, public service, and politics. In 1854 West helped found the Republican party in Ohio and six years later he participated in Abraham Lincoln’s nomination for the presidency. West served consecutive terms in both houses of Ohio’s General Assembly from 1857 to 1865 and was elected the state’s attorney general at the end of the Civil War. He became an Ohio Supreme Court justice in 1871 and in 1877 was his party’s nominee for governor. After losing his sight, Judge West retired from the court but continued to practice law. At the Republican party’s convention in 1884, the “Blind Man Eloquent” nominated James G. Blaine as the G.O.P.’s presidential candidate. Defining Republicans as a party for “union, freedom, humanity, and progress,” the judge’s nomination speech sparked a celebration that historian David McCullough described as “one of the most memorable events in the whole history of national political conventions.”

229 Mill Street
Middleport

, OH

Edward A. Bennett, PFC, Co. B., 358th. Inf. Regt., 90th Inf. Div. Honored for bravery during combat in Germany, Feb., 1945. Award presented by President Truman in October. Bennett retired from service with the rank of Major on Feb. 1, 1965. He was born Feb. 11, 1920 and died May 2, 1983. Jimmy G. Stewart, S/Sgt., Co. B, 2nd Bn., 12th Cav. Div. Killed in action in Vietnam, May 18, 1966. He was born December 25, 1942. Honored for courage against overwhelming odds in protecting wounded comrades. Stewart Field, Ft. Benning, Georgia, dedicated to his memory in Feb., 1968.

SE of intersection of Paige Street & N Lynn Street
Bryan

, OH

In 1966 the New York Central Railroad Company (A.E. Perlman, President) proposed a test of existing rail passenger equipment to determine the feasibility of operating high-speed passenger service between cities up to 300 miles apart. The site chosen for the test was near Bryan, Ohio on the longest multiple track straight railroad line in the world. This sixty-seven mile straight trackage from Toledo, Ohio to Butler, Indiana was originally constructed by the Northern Indiana Railroad Company of Ohio incorporated March 3, 1851. On July 23, 1966 the New York Central Technical Research Department ran their Budd RDC-3 passenger car number M-497 fully instrumented for stress analysis, and propelled by two roof-mounted jet aircraft engines. The speed of 183.85 miles per hour was attained, the highest recorded on a railroad in North America at that time and to this day.

10 Willettsville Pike
Hillsboro

, OH

Creator of some of America’s favorite cartoon characters, Milton Caniff was born in Hillsboro in 1907 and graduated from Ohio State University in 1930. He created his first comic strip in 1932 for the Associated Press Syndicate, and in 1934 introduced “Terry and the Pirates,” an innovative serial adventure featuring believable characters drawn with unprecedented realism. Enormously popular through the World War II years for both “Terry” and the comic strip “Male Call,” which he created for the U.S. military’s Camp Newspaper Service, Caniff subsequently introduced “Steve Canyon” in 1947. “Steve Canyon” ran for forty-one years until Caniff’s death in 1988. Credited with influencing generations of successful cartoonists, Caniff brought adventure, suspense, and sensuality to what had been largely a medium for humor and melodrama.

S Main Street/N County Road 25A
Piqua

, OH

African-American history began in Piqua with the settlement of Arthur Davis in 1818 and expanded with the settlement of the freed Randolph slaves of Virginia in 1846. African-American religious heritage in Piqua began with the Cyrene African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1853 and the Second Baptist Church (Park Avenue) in 1857. Segregated education started in 1854 at the Cyrene Church and ended in 1885 at the Boone Street School. Several Piqua African-American men circumvented Ohio’s early ban against Civil War military service by joining the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments. Following the Civil War an African-American Co-operative Trade Association established Piqua’s first African-American retail store. Continued on/from other side)