Remarkable Ohio

Results for: toledo
55 S 1st Street (The Works Museum)
Newark

, OH

During the 1830s, the Ohio & Erie Canal was built through Newark. The Lockmaster’s House was home to the lockmaster of Lock #9. In 1852, the first railroad locomotive steamed into Newark, signaling the beginning of the end for the canal. By 1871, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad took over the Lockmaster’s House and the encompassing land, and built the Little Red House on the corner for the stationmaster and telegraph operator. Passenger and freight stations, a freight yard, and roundhouse were constructed nearby and served as a B&O Division Point. In 1881, the Scheidler Machine Works built a factory to manufacture steam engines and sawmills. This building now houses The Works Museum. In 1890, an electric interurban railway line connected Newark’s B&O Station to the Toledo & Ohio Central station in Granville. By 1908, the old canal was filled-in. Interurban service ended in 1929 when the city purchased buses.

MUOT Boulevard
Toledo

, OH

State interest in medical education for northwest Ohio became a reality when the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo was established in December, 1964. Located initially at South Detroit and Arlington on Lucas County property, MCO moved to the present 350-acre campus starting in 1972. It is the area’s first medical school since the closing of the Toledo Medical College (1882-1914).

Toledo

, OH

St. Vincent’s Hospital, renamed the St. Vincent Medical Center in 1983, was founded in 1855 by the Sisters of Charity of Montreal, the “Grey Nuns.” They came, following the 1854 cholera epidemic, in answer to a plea from a local Catholic priest “to raise orphans and help cure the sick.” The facility has been located at this site since 1858.

Vermilion

, OH

At this site the Lake Shore Electric Railway crossed a bridge that spanned the Vermilion River. The western abutment of the former bridge is plainly visible just below along the river bank. Widely known as the “Greatest Electric Railway in the United States,” the flaming orange trolley cars of the Lake Shore Electric Railway transported people and freight for thirty-seven years (1901-1938) along the southern Lake Erie shores from Cleveland to Toledo often reaching speeds of sixty miles per hour. The interurban line played a primary role in the development of the western Cleveland suburbs and also carried throngs of summer visitors to Lake Erie recreation facilities at Avon Beach Park, Linwood Park, Crystal Beach, Mitiwanga, Ruggles Grove, Rye Beach, and Cedar Point. The power lines still standing along the system’s right-of-way attest to the fact that it also assisted in bringing electric power to the entire region.

3795 N Summit Street
Toledo

, OH

The original northernmost lock in a canal system which linked Lake Erie with the Ohio River was located near the foot of LaSalle Street. Indiana’s Wabash & Erie Canal (1843-1874) joined Ohio’s Miami & Erie Canal (1845-1913) near Defiance and shared the same course to this location. Toledo’s Swan Creek side cut became the northern terminus in 1864.

Oberlin

, OH

The intersection of Main and College streets has been the center of Oberlin since the town and college were founded in 1833. The first downtown buildings were made of wood and were destroyed by a series of spectacular fires. The first college building, Oberlin Hall, stood on the southwest corner of College and Main and included recitation rooms, a dining hall, chapel, offices, and lodging. In 1887, Akron architect Frank Weary designed the large brick building at numbers 5 to 13 West College. Number 23 West College (Gibson Block) once housed a silent movie theater on the second floor. East College Street’s historic buildings include the Apollo Theater, which showed Oberlin’s first talking movie on May 11, 1928. From 1897 to 1929, an interurban streetcar line connected Oberlin’s downtown to Cleveland. Oberlin’s downtown historic district was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

E of Campus Road, S of Bancroft Street
Toledo

, OH

The Toledo University of Arts and Trades was established in 1872 with an endowment of 160 acres of land from Jesup W. Scott, local pioneer, publisher, and real estate broker. Scott envisioned Toledo as the “Future Great City of the World” and wanted an institution to train young people to fulfill their roles in the city’s bright future.

Near 3420 Engle Mill Road
Xenia

, OH

Built in 1877 and spanning 136 feet, the Engle Mill Road Covered Bridge carried vehicular traffic until 2003. The bridge is named after the nearby Levi Engle Mill. It is one of a few dozen Smith Truss bridges in the United States. The Smith Bridge Company manufactured the bridge using the Smith Truss patent, invented by founder, Robert W. Smith. The company originated in Tippecanoe City, Ohio and relocated to Toledo, where it was purchased by the Toledo Bridge Company in 1890. Smith died in 1898 at the age of 63, leaving a legacy of unique bridges.