Results for: second-great-awakening
Oxford

, OH

Established under the provisions of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Miami University received its charter in 1809 and derived much of its early support from land grants from the original Symmes Purchase. Collegiate instruction began in 1824. Elliot Hall (1828) and Stoddard Hall (1835) are the oldest collegiate residence halls in Ohio. Here William Holmes McGuffey, Miami’s second professor of languages, wrote the first edition of his Readers series; first published in 1836, these famous texts are the most widely read schoolbooks in American history with over 130 million copies printed. Benjamin Harrison, the 23rd president of the United States, was an 1852 graduate. Five national fraternities trace their birth to Miami University.

Cheshire Village Park, E. Main Street at the river
Cheshire

, OH

In 1955, at the age of 67, Emma Rowena “Grandma” Gatewood became the first woman to hike the 2,050 mile Appalachian Trail alone and in one season. The Gallia County, Ohio resident hiked the Appalachian Trail again in 1957 and 1964, becoming the first to walk its length three times. In 1959, she hiked the Oregan Trail, from Independence, Missouri to Portland, Oregon. She was a founder of the Buckeye Trail and life member of the Buckeye Trail Association, which named part of the trail after her. Grandma Gatewood was born in 1887 on a farm near Mercerville, one of 15 children, and died in 1973 at the age of 85, the mother of 11 and “grandma” to many more. SHe was inducted into the Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame in 2012.

605 Miami Street
Urbana

, OH

The Johnson Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1902 by brothers James B., J. Will, Isaac T., and Charles F. Johnson, all of Quaker heritage. The company manufactured tin and galvanized iron ware for railroad lines across the United States. The initial product was the No. 1 long-spouted locomotive oiler with the patented dripless spout. That was quickly followed by other types of oil cans, signaling equipment, engine buckets, tallow pots, torches, track inspection devices, tin cups, and caboose and cabin car lamps, all carrying the Diamond J trademark. The makers created the patterns and everything was cut, riveted, and soldered by hand. As production expanded, the original frame building at 605 Miami Street was replaced by a brick structure in 1910, the southernmost part of the present building. (continued on other side)

142 E Fifth St
Zoar

, OH

Designed by their leader, Joseph M. Bimeler, the Meeting House is the second house of worship used by the Society of Separatists of Zoar. Men and women entered through separate front doors: men used the right door and women the left. Bimeler and his successors gave “discourses” (not sermons) from a table located between the doors. The Meeting House has been in continuous use since it was built in 1853 and as of 2011 houses the Zoar United Church of Christ.

5995 Horseshoe Bend Rd
Troy

, OH

The 1804 Iddings House is the oldest structure on its original site in Miami County. A second generation American and cousin to General “Mad” Anthony Wayne, Benjamin Iddings brought his wife, Phoebe, and six of their ten children up the Stillwater River into Newton Township and constructed the log house in 1804. In 1976 the structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places with an initial restoration in 1981. Thanks to community support, further restoration was completed in 2006.

845 Liberty Street
Findlay

, OH

In spite of small numbers and being welcomed by the mostly white congregation of First Methodist Episcopal Church, African Americans in Findlay in the 1880s wanted to express their faith in ways that best reflected their freedoms and traditions. By the mid-1880s, the congregation was meeting in members’ homes and the Odd Fellows Hall, but began fund raising to build their own church in 1885. The congregation was admitted to the North Ohio Conference of the Third Episcopal District of the African Methodist Church in 1885, one of the first churches to be so admitted. The building on Liberty Street was well underway by the end of 1887 on a lot donated by Judge D. J. Cory. The original twenty foot by forty foot building cost $2,000 and immediately became a focal point for religion and social events for Findlay’s African American community. (Continued on other side)

Oxford Township Cemetery, 6829 Brown Road
Oxford

, OH

In the early years of the nineteenth century, a religious unrest known as the Second Great Awakening spread across much of the American frontier. Among the most influential of the evolving religious organizations were the Campbellites, or Disciples of Christ, founded in the 1820s by Thomas and Alexander Campbell. The Campbellite movement sought to “restore” New Testament Christianity by calling for a return to the primitive church revealed in the gospels. Campbellites denied creeds and oath-taking and rejected sectarianism. They believed in baptism by immersion and communion on Sundays. Followers also dealt with problems and transgressions of members within the church and did not use civil courts. They held a millennial view that professed human happiness and the belief that Christ would reign on earth for a thousand years. Believers spread this word to the pioneers of the Doty Settlement and elsewhere. By 1850, there were ninety Campbellite Churches in Ohio.

201 West State Street
North Baltimore

, OH

The North Baltimore Elementary and High School stood at 124 S. Second St. and was dedicated November 11, 1927. The tan and brown brick building replaced a school (built 1884) that a fire destroyed on January 26, 1926. The new school building, for children in grades 1-12, also included classrooms for home economics and business courses, as well as a 900-seat auditorium (including balcony), second floor cafeteria, gymnasium, administrative offices, and a public library. E.E. Leidy was the school’s superintendent and R. Vern Northup was the high school principal. The members of the board of education were Dr. E.A. Powell, President, D.B. Bushey, Vice President, C.G. Nigh, Clerk, and Nellie Roberts and R.E. Simon. Previously known as the “Independents,” the school’s sports teams became the “Tigers” in 1931. (Continued on other side)