Results for: cuyahoga
14013 Detroit Road
Lakewood

, OH

Dr. Jared Potter Kirtland was a prominent nineteenth century professor, physician, naturalist and horticulturist. In 1837, Kirtland purchased land in Rockport Township that stretched from Madison Avenue to Lake Erie. Kirtland used that land as a natural laboratory and filled it with gardens, greenhouses and an arboretum where he developed fruit and grape varieties best suited for the region. His success with new varieties inspired area farmers to successfully concentrate on fruit and grape growing. In 1839, he built a home at Detroit and Bunts Roads and lived there unitl his death in 1877. (Continued on other side)

(Approx.) 19480 Puritas Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

Puritas Mineral Spring Company bottled and sold mineral water from the natural springs in the area. In 1894, the Cleveland and Berea Street Railway bought Puritas Springs and expanded the area into a picnic grove with a dance hall and pavilion to increase passenger traffic on the inter-urban line. Puritas Springs Park opened June 10, 1900- the first day the railways operated all the way to the entrance gates. John E. Gooding bought Puritas Springs in June 1915 and added and indoor roller rink, amusement rides, and the mighty Cyclone roller coaster. Labor Day 1958 the park closed, and on May 9, 1059 a fire destroyed many parts of the abondoned park.

Hilliard Blvd. and Clague Rd.
Westlake

, OH

“Uncle” George Lathrop Cooley (1861-1939) was known as the “Champion of the Farmer” for his advocacy on behalf of rural interests. He was born on a farm at the northwest corner of Dover and Hilliard Roads in Dover Township (Westlake). He attended area schools and Ohio Northern University and, in 1887, married Clara Hall. Cooley served as Dover Township trustee from 1901-1905 and as president of Dover’s village council in 1916. Cooley’s interest in better roads led him to supervise the hard-surfacing of Dover Center Road, which ran by his house. From about 1900 to 1913, he was involved in road construction and helped to organize state highway departments in Ohio, Louisiana and California. (Continued on other side)

St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 50 E Bagley Road
Berea

, OH

This “little gem of a stone church,” built and dedicated in 1893, is constructed of locally quarried, rusticated Berea sandstone blocks. A Celtic cross at the top of the west wall represented the areas of Great Britain from which many original parish members immigrated to this area of Ohio. The chapel is named in honor of John Ogilvy. He was not a member of St. Thomas Church, but he did leave a bequest which the parish used to erect the chapel. It was constructed at a cost of $4,174.70.

Columbia Rd & Water St
Olmsted Falls

, OH

In 1795, the Connecticut Land Company auctioned twenty-five square miles of land known as Plum Creek Township. Aaron Olmsted, a sea captain, purchased almost half of the property. Although Olmsted died before ever seeing his land, in 1829, his son Charles offered to donate books to the area in exchange for changing the settlement’s name from Lenox to Olmsted. In 1815, shoemaker James Geer and his family became the first permanent American residents to settle in the southern end of the area. Geer’s farm was on what is now Columbia Road.

20001 Euclid Avenue
Euclid

, OH

By 1922, the Ambler Realty Company of Cleveland owned this site along with 68 acres of land between Euclid Avenue and the Nickel Plate rail line. Upon learning of the company’s plans for industrial development, the Euclid Village Council enacted a zoning code based on New York City’ building restrictions. Represented by Newton D. Baker, former Cleveland mayor and U.S. Secretary of War under Woodrow Wilson, Ambler sued the village claiming a loss of property value. In 1926, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Euclid and upheld the constitutionality of zoning and land-use regulations by local governments. The federal government eventually acquired the Ambler site during World War II to build a factory to make aircraft engines and landing gear. From 1948 to 1992, the site was used as a production facility by the Fisher Body Division of General Motors.

19621 Lake Road West
Rocky River

, OH

With work inspired by mythology, literature, religion and nature, Cowan Pottery played a significant role in the formative years of American ceramic art and established a national following with products sold in fine department stores. The design studio, factory and showroom of Cowan Pottery stood here from 1920-1931. R. Guy Cowan moved the business to Rocky River from Lakewood, where it started in 1913. Although Cowan Pottery closed during the Depression, the firm’s work is still collected and can be found in the Smithsonian, Cleveland Museum of Art and other museums. Comprehensive holdings are in the Cowan Pottery Museum at the Rocky River Public Library.

26900 Cook Road
Olmsted Township

, OH

The community of Olmsted commemorated its bicentennial in 2014. In 1795, the Connecticut Land Company auctioned a tract of land called Township 6, Range 15. Almost half the northern side was purchased by Aaron Olmsted, though he would die before seeing the land. In 1814, James Geer cleared a plot in the southeastern corner of the township to grow corn. He built a log house and moved his family there. Originally called Kingston, the township was renamed Lenox in 1823. In 1829, the settlement became Olmsted; in return, Aaron Olmsted’s son Charles donated 500 books for the creation of a community library.