Results for: cuyahoga
2080 Adelbert Road
Cleveland

, OH

The Michelson-Morley Experiment, conducted at Western Reserve University in July 1887, provides the earliest direct evidence that would later support Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. Albert A. Michelson, professor of physics at the Case School of Applied Sciences, and Edward Morley, professor of chemistry at Western Reserve University, tested the prevailing scientific theory that light waves travel faster downwind and slower against an upwind as they travel through a substance once thought to permeate space called aether. Finding no differences in the velocity of light waves traveling in different directions with respect to Earth’s motion around the sun, the experiment’s results baffled a generation of scientists until Einstein solved the riddle by formulating a new understanding of time and space. In 1907, Michelson, then head of the physics department at the University of Chicago, became the first American scientist to earn the Nobel Prize; he did so in physics.

SW corner of N. Main Street and Bell Street
Chagrin Falls

, OH

The Chagrin River was named for Francois Seguin, a Frenchman who traded with Native Americans in Northeast Ohio circa 1742. The “High Falls” of the Chagrin River primarily attracted settlers from New England (circa 1833) seeking a location with ample waterpower. By the mid-nineteenth century an axe factory, a foundry, 2 flour mills, 4 woolen mills, 2 sawmills, 3 paper mills, and a woodenware factory had been built along the riverbanks in Chagrin Falls. The “High Falls” provided a power source for a gristmill, built in 1836 at this location. Today, only one factory remains in operation in the Village of Chagrin Falls.

Pettibone Park, across from 29765 Pettibone Road
Solon

, OH

The Village of Glenwillow was developed and has survived over the last century as a rural enclave whose character has been shaped by the Austin Powder Company. Glenwillow began as a company town of the Austin Powder Company, which relocated its explosives factory from Cleveland in 1892. The Falls Junction Depot was originally built in 1883 and located approximately 1/4 mile to the north at the junction of the existing Wheeling and Lake Erie track and a rail line that connected to Chagrin Falls. The Depot was moved to its present location when Austin Powder Company relocated to Glenwillow. Passenger trains on the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway provided Glenwillow residents access to the larger cities of Cleveland, Kent, and Akron, and provided a route for Austin Powder to ship its explosives to mines in southeast Ohio. The Depot, which operated until 1974, is now an important component to the revitalization of the Glenwillow Town Center.

1234 Bolivar Road
Cleveland

, OH

The Cleveland Grays were organized by statute in 1837 as an independent volunteer militia company. The Grays were the first company to leave Cleveland for service during the Civil War. In April 1861, they were designated Company E, 1st Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI). They saw action at Vienna Station and First Manassas and also served in the 84th OVI and were on duty with the 150th OVI at Fort Stephens when Confederate General Jubal Early attacked Washington in the summer of 1864. During the Spanish-American War the Grays volunteered for service and were admitted to the National Guard as the 1st Battalion of Engineers, 10th OVI. In 1916, they joined General John J. Pershing’s Punitive Expedition against Mexico. After service on the Mexican border, the Grays became part of the 1st Battalion, 148th Infantry Regiment, 37th “Buckeye” Division. (continued on other side)

Heritage Park, near 1505 Merwin Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

Born at Richford, New York, John D. Rockefeller moved to the Cleveland area with his family at age 14. He began his business career as a bookkeeper in 1855. From modest beginnings he became one of the richest men of his era by developing the world’s largest oil corporation, the Standard Oil Company, which was founded here in the Flats of Cleveland. Rockefeller moved to New York City in 1884 but maintained two homes in Cleveland, returning often with his wife Laura (1839-1915). Although he was a controversial businessman, Rockefeller donated millions of dollars to Cleveland charities and institutions, and land for Rockefeller and Forest Hills parks. John and Laura Rockefeller are interred in Lake View Cemetery.

Settlers Landing Park
Cleveland

, OH

In July 1796, the first survey party for the Connecticut Land Company, led by General Moses Cleaveland (1754-1806), landed on the shore of Lake Erie near present-day Ashtabula to lay out the lands of the Connecticut Western Reserve. On July 22, the party arrived at the mouth of the Cuyahoga River, the western boundary line for American settlement established by the Treaty of Greenville, and set up a base camp near this site. On the eastern river bluff the surveyors platted the “capital town” of the Western Reserve and called it Cleaveland; a misspelling later changed the name to Cleveland. The original survey called for a Public Square, surrounded by right-angled streets and uniformly-shaped lots. Cleaveland returned to Connecticut in October to resume his law practice and never returned to Ohio.

Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland

, OH

Frances Payne Bolton (1885-1977) was the first woman from Ohio to serve in the United States Congress. Elected in 1940 to complete the term of her late husband, Chester C. Bolton, Mrs. Bolton represented the 22nd District for 28 years. Her life long advocacy of nursing education is reflected in both her philanthropy and the legislation she supported. Her gift to Western Reserve University in 1923 enabled the school to set up one of the first college-based nursing programs in the country. The school was renamed the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing in her honor in 1935. The Bolton Bill she supported in Congress created the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps to address the critical shortage of nurses during World War II.

Laurel School, 1 Lyman Circle
Shaker Heights

, OH

Florence E. Allen (1884-1966) was nicknamed “first lady of the law” for her many firsts as a woman in the legal profession. After graduating from Western Reserve College for Women, she taught at Laurel School from 1906 to 1909. She then became a crusader for women’s rights, and in 1913 received a law degree from New York University. Allen was appointed as an assistant Cuyahoga County prosecutor in 1919, the first woman in the country to hold such a position. In 1920, she was elected to Cleveland’s Court of Common Pleas, advancing, in 1922, to the Ohio Supreme Court, where she served two terms. In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Allen to the nation’s second highest tribunal, the United States Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, where she became its first female member. In 1958, she was elevated to Chief Justice of that body and retired in 1965.