Results for: cuyahoga
Memorial School, 410 E 152nd Street
Cleveland

, OH

The Village of Collinwood was originally a part of Euclid Township of the Western Reserve and named after the death of railroad chief engineer Charles Collins in 1876. Originally known as “Frogsville,” the population of Collinwood dramatically increased in the 1870s, due partly to repair roundhouses of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. By 1901, the Village has grown to 7,500, and as a result, the schoolhouse, which once housed 200 students and four classrooms, had been enlarged twice to house 350 students in eight classrooms. Constructed in 1901, the Lakeview School was the site of a tragedy that reverberated across the nation and around the world. (Continued on other side)

4645 Mayfield Road
South Euclid

, OH

William E. Telling (1869-1938) was one of ten children born in a farmhouse on this property. As a boy he sold strawberries and milk door-to-door and worked in a local sandstone quarry until at age 23 he purchased a milk route. He and four brothers formed the Telling Brothers Ice Cream Company in 1895 with William as president. A merger in 1915 formed the Telling Belle Vernon Dairy Company that was the first local distributor of pasteurized, glass-bottled milk. Their unique bacteriological laboratory (later Sealtest Laboratories) developed the baby food S.M.A. His recipe for success was “just work and work and work some more; do the work of two and draw the pay of one.”

1360 Nicholson Ave.
Lakewood

, OH

At this location, in 1913, R. Guy Cowan opened Northeast Ohio’s only art pottery, the Cowan Pottery Studio (known first as the Cleveland Pottery and Tile Company). Cowan began molding Lakewood’s clay into sculptural forms covered with unique glazes. Cowan’s venture depended on the commercial success of his tiles, which adorned homes and community institutions throughout greater Cleveland. By 1917, his Lakewood Ware had achieved international recognition with an ward from the Art Institute of Chicago. After his World War I service, Cowan returned to Lakewood, where a drained gas well prompted the pottery’s relocation to Rocky River. Until the pottery closed in 1931, a casualty of the Great Depression, its artists produced elegant household wares and limited-edition ceramic sculptures that were sold throughout the United States and Canada.

1573 E. 214th Street
Euclid

, OH

Japanese-American Buddhists, who resettled in the Cleveland area in 1943-44 after being released from World War II internment camps, established the oldest continually meeting Buddhist organization in Ohio. The organization was originally known as the Cleveland Young Buddhist Association and is now known as the Cleveland Buddhist Temple. Services were held in members’ homes until a building on East 81st Street was purchased in 1955. After extensive damage to the building during the Hough riots in 1966, the Temple’s current residence was acquired in 1968. Affiliated with the Buddhist Churches of America, the Temple serves the Jodo Shinshu Tradition of Buddhism. In 1979, the Temple under the direction of Sensei Koshin Ogui introduced the Zen Shin meditation practice in response to public wishes. The Temple welcomes all those wishing to study the teachings of the Buddha.

E 14th Street
Cleveland

, OH

ʻAbdu’l-Bahá (1844-1921) visited Cleveland on His historic journeys to Europe and North America to proclaim the message of His Father, Baháʼu’lláh, Prophet-Founder of the Baháʼí­ Faith. Together they suffered 40 years of imprisonment and exile, which began in Persia with their support of the Báb, Baháʼu’lláh’s forerunner. In 1912, following His release from prison in Palestine, ʻAbdu’l-Bahá toured many American cities as Baháʼu’lláh’s designated successor. He spoke in Cleveland on May 6th and 7th, at the former Hotel Euclid and other sites, sharing this message: “The oneness of humankind will be a fact. The various religions shall be united, and the various races shall be known as one kind. The Orient and the Occident shall be united and the banner of international peace shall be unfurled. The world shall find peace and the equality and rights of men shall be established.” Since His visit, the Baháʼí­­ Faith has gained millions of followers, and it has been established in most countries and territories of the world.

Cleveland Metroparks Polo Field, S. Woodland Road/OH 87
Chagrin Falls

, OH

On July 25, 1965, nearly 10,000 spectators traveled to the Cleveland Metroparks Polo Field to witness the first-ever North American horse show jumping grand prix-the Cleveland Grand Prix. The event gave birth to the multi-million-dollar sport of grand prix horse show jumping in the United States. Held on the final day of the Chagrin Valley PHA Horse Show, the Cleveland Grand Prix was defined by the 844-yard course of 16 obstacles designed by Laddie Andahazy and D. Jerry Baker. Twenty riders from six countries–the United States, Canada, Mexico, France, Great Britain, and Germany–competed over the course. Mary Mairs Chapot won the event on her horse Tomboy and her husband Frank, an Olympic veteran, finished second aboard Manon.

2355 E. 89th Street
Cleveland

, OH

Karamu House, Incorporated was established in 1915 as the Playhouse Settlement, one of Cleveland’s many settlement houses for migrant and immigrant communities. Initiated by the Men’s Club of the Second Presbyterian Church, in 1915 Oberlin College and University of Chicago social work graduates, Russell and Rowena Woodham Jellliffe were hired as the founding directors. Originally located at 2239 East 38th Street, the Playhouse Settlement offered children’s theater and other social, recreational, and educational activities. It soon developed a partnership with the Dumas Dramatic Club, a local African American theater company that later became known as the Gilpin Players. (continued on other side)

2320 E 30th Street
Cleveland

, OH

John Malvin (1795-1880) was an operative on the Underground Railroad and an ardent member of anti-slavery and abolitionist causes. Born in Dumfries, Virginia of a free mother and enslaved father, Malvin was apprenticed at an early age to learn carpentry and taught himself to read and write. In 1827, he moved to Cincinnati where he became an ordained preacher and an activist in the cause of freedom. In 1831, with his wife Harriet, he moved to Cleveland where he became a charter member of the First Baptist Church, a sawmill operator, and captain and owner of the canal boat Auburn. (continued on other side)