Results for: veterans
4294 Shawnee Trace Road
Blanchester

, OH

Descendants of Lemuel Garrison Sr., a Revolutionary War soldier, were among the first Europeans to own and settle land at Garrison Corner (intersection of State Route 123 and Shawnee Trace) . Garrison Cemetery burials took place from ca. 1837 to 1936. The cemetery has 327 lots. Eighty-six burials are documented including veterans John J. Garrsion, Benjamin Garritson, James Knicely, Nicodemus Rude, and William Rude. (continued on other side)

5501 E. Lake Road
Sheffield Lake

, OH

The 103rd O.V.I. was recruited for Civil War service from Cuyahoga, Lorain, and Medina counties. The Regiment was organized at Cleveland in August, 1862, and served until 1865 in campaigns at Cincinnati, Knoxville, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, and the Carolinas.103rd O.V.I. veterans and their descendants have held continuous, annual reunions since 1866. The organization is believed to be unique in the nation. Descendants live on these grounds today.

Near 1888 OH 376
Stockport

, OH

The Windsor Township Baptist Association was organized January 11, 1818 by Elder William Davis with 35 members who met in homes, barns and schoolhouses. At the death of the six-year-old granddaughter of Samuel and Tabitha Davis Henery, this plot by the river was laid out of a church yard and deeded by John Henery in 1837. In 1838 a brick church was built at the cost of $1,000. It served this community until the road and church were destroyed by the flood of 1913. More than 50 men from this area served in the Civil War. Twenty-six War of 1812 veterans are buried here as well as William Davis, veteran of the American Revolution; Obadiah Brokaw, founder of Big Bottom State Memorial; and Captain Isaac Newton Hook, river pilot at the age of ten and U.S. master of inland navigation, 1860-1873, who ran supplies on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers for the Union Army. At Captain Hook’s death in 1906, the steamers Valley Gem, Zanesville, and Sonoma from Marietta in his honor landed passengers at the church here for his funeral, “largest ever held in the Muskingum Valley.” “The Lord and the River giveth and then taketh away.”

Marysville

, OH

The first permanent settlement in the Marysville area, was founded in 1817 by Revolutionary War veteran Abraham Amrine (1761-1849) and his sons. The Amrines emigrated from Switzerland to Pennsylvania in the early 1700s and, after living in Belmont County, Ohio for 16 years, Abraham purchased 1000 acres here along Mill Creek circa 1817, paying $2 an acre. When Paris Township was organized in 1821, the township officers were elected in Amrine’s home on Newton Pike (now Raymond Road). All seven of his sons, John, Andrew, Moses, Frederick, Jeremiah, Abraham, Jr., and Henry, settled here. Andrew was a Justice of the Peace and leader in the church. Near this site, Henry built a sawmill in 1822 and a gristmill in 1825, which were operated by the family for more than 50 years.

N 4th Street & Ellet Street
Martins Ferry

, OH

The Walnut Grove Cemetery is the burial place of members of the Zane and Martin families. Their graves lie within the brick enclosure. The cemetery is also the resting-place of many early Martins Ferry residents, including veterans of the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. The Zane and Martin families were significant in the pioneer history of the region. Betty Zane’s legendary heroism at Fort Henry (now Wheeling, West Virginia) helped settlers resist an attack by the British and their Native American allies in September 1782. (Continued on other side)

Mount Vernon

, OH

Mary Ann Ball was born in this vicinity in 1817 and began her nursing career at age 20. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Mary at the age of 45 went to the soldiers’ aid. Ignoring rank, protocol, and allegiance, she pursued fearlessly and with inexhaustible energy her mission to care for the sick and wounded. Rebel, Union, and Negro soldiers all received the same attention. She risked enemy fire, especially through Grant’s Western Campaign and Sherman’s Georgia Campaign, to rescue suffering men, often going out at night to hunt for the fallen. When the victorious armies of the North were reviewed in Washington at the war’s end, “Mother Bickerdyke” road her faithful white horse beside the generals and colonels. Veterans along the line of march gave her the loudest cheers.

7770 Jacksontown Road SE
Newark

, OH

Spring, 1800, Benjamin Green and family become the first legal settlers in Licking County, followed by the Stadden family; Col. John Stadden marries Elizabeth Green on Christmas Day. Spring, 1801, clearings cut for cabins on Hog Run; Johnny Appleseed plants his orchards. 1808, John Beard family settles. 1810, first burial. 1811-41, these families bury six Revolutionary War veterans.

Ritter Park, West Riverview Ave
Napoleon

, OH

Camp Latty was located at the corner of Riverview and Glenwood Avenues in Napoleon, Ohio and included Glenwood Cemetery in its grounds. This camp was named for Judge Alexander S. Latty, a staunch supporter of the Union. From October to December 1861 the 68th Regiment was organized. The 68th Regiment then took part in the Battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, the Siege of Corinth, the Battles of Hatchies’s Bridge, Port Gibson, Raymond, Champion Hill, the Siege of Vicksburg, the Meridian Campaign, the Atlanta Campaign, the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, the Battle of Atlanta, the Siege of Atlanta, the Battle of Jonesboro, Sherman’s March to the Sea, the Carolinas Campaign, the Battle of Bentonville, the Surrender of Johnston’s Army, and the Grand Review in Washington, D.C. The 68th Regiment served in every Confederate State except Florida and Texas. (Continued on other side)