Results for: roads
South Bloomingville

, OH

Modern roads often have their precedents in much older thoroughfares. Two ancient paths once converged near this point. As late as the 1700s, the Salt Trail guided Native Americans from the upper Scioto Valley plains past Cantwell Cliffs, Cedar Falls, and Ash Cave to the salt springs in present-day Jackson County to obtain this precious commodity. The alignment of this path parallels State Route 56 from South Bloomingville and then turns southward along Narrows Road through the Salt Creek valley. An important Shawnee hunting trail extended from the Chillicothe area to the wooded hills in this region, which abounded in elk, buffalo, black bear, deer, and wild turkey. Route 56 from Ash Cave to Laurelville closely follows this trail.

965 E. Wyandot Avenue
Upper Sandusky

, OH

Conceived by leaders of the automobile industry to encourage the building of “good roads,” the Lincoln Highway was established in 1913 as the first transcontinental automobile route in the United States. It traversed twelve states and 3,389 miles from New York to San Francisco. The first route across Ohio connected Van Wert, Delphos, Lima, Ada, Upper Sandusky, Bucyrus, Galion, Mansfield, Ashland, Wooster, Massillon, Canton, Minerva, Lisbon, and East Liverpool. By the 1930s much of the original route had become part of the Federal Highway System and U.S. Route 30–many miles of which have, in turn, been bypassed by modern four-lane highways.

U.S. 62
New Market

, OH

In 1798, Henry Massie, brother of General Nathaniel Massie, platted a town, the earliest permanent settlement in Highland County, covering 400 acres and named it New Market after a town in his native Virginia. New Market served as the unofficial county seat until Hillsboro assumed that title in 1807. Despite being traversed by the Cincinnati-Chillicothe Post Road with seven other roads (including one from Manchester) leading in, New Market ceased being an active trade and civic center. It is now a small hamlet with a cluster of dwellings, a church, and a few businesses.

100 E Main Street
McArthur

, OH

Ohio’s first female county sheriff, Maude Charles Collins (1893-1972) of Vinton County was appointed to finish her husband Fletcher’s term after he was killed in the line of duty in October 1925. In 1926, she ran for the office in her own right on the Democratic ticket and handily beat males in both the primary and general elections. “Sheriff Maude” investigated crimes, answered calls, patrolled roads, and performed the duties of her office, all while raising five children. She gained national attention for solving an intriguing double murder case in 1926, later featured in Master Detective and Startling Detective magazines. In 1927 she was the first woman to deliver inmates to the Ohio State Penitentiary in Columbus. Collins, a pioneering woman in law enforcement, was inducted into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame in 2000. She is buried in Hamden Cemetery.

Between 1717 and 1739 N Fountain Blvd
Springfield

, OH

The Ridgewood neighborhood, platted in 1914, was one of the first fully planned and restricted suburbs in the United States. Its innovative developer, Springfield native Harry S. Kissell, was among a small group of nationally-acclaimed real estate developers who, in the early twentieth century, created the modern suburb as we know it today. Their developments offered spacious lots in park-like settings; curvilinear, paved roads; utilities, and sewers. They also ushered in the practice of deed restrictions, which were both protective and exclusionary. Harry Kissell went on to become president of the National Association of Real Estate Boards in 1931. During his tenure, he conceived the idea for the Federal Home Loan Banking system, which, during the Great Depression, saved millioins of Americans from foreclosure and permanently opened up the possibility of home ownership to the middle class.

17851 OH 247
Seaman

, OH

Founded 1887 by John Q. Roads on the Cincinnati & Eastern Railway (1881) and the Old West Union Road (1807). Incorporated 1911. Named after Franklin Seaman who donated land to the railroad for a station. Home of Will Rogers, “The Black King of the Air,” the only black hot air balloonist in the U.S. in the 1890’s. “Adopted hometown” of Daniel Homer Webster (1878-1943), poet, humorist and Dayton, Ohio, journalist.

1995 Broadway Avenue
Stockport

, OH

The Stockport Mill, the third on this site since 1842, was built in 1906 by the Dover brothers. Using a pair of 40-inch Leffel turbines, it harnessed water power for both milling and generating electricity for the town. Known for its Gold Bond, Seal of Ohio, and Pride of the Valley refined flours, the Stockport Milling Company shipped its products by steam packet boat and over the Ohio & Little Kanawha Railroad before the era of all-weather roads. The mill also functioned as a community hub where local farmers obtained supplies and shared news. It ceased operation as a feed mill in 1997.

13526 Hackett Road
Apple Creek (Kidron)

, OH

In the summer of 1819 settlers from Sonnenberg in the Jura Mountains of Canton Bern, Switzerland arrived in Wayne County, Ohio. They fled the religious persecution they endured because of their Anabaptist-Mennonite beliefs, including adult baptism and the separation of church and state. Ulrich Lehman, Johannes Amstutz, and the families of Peter and Barbara (Bogli) Lehman, David and Barbara (Thuller) Kirchhofer, Isaac and Katharina (Lehman) Sommer purchased 320 acres about two miles northeast of Kidron, centered near the intersection of Zuercher and Hackett roads, and began new lives. Their families and their faith continue to flourish in the Kidron-Sonnenberg area.