Remarkable Ohio

Results for: african-methodist-episcopal-church
2663 Prairie Street
New Haven

, OH

New Haven, Ohio, was the mercantile center of southwest Huron County during the first half of the 19th century. Residents described immense wagons, or “land schooners,” lined up for miles on the New Haven-Worthington Road traveling from Columbus to the Lake Erie ports. Organized in 1815, New Haven was one of the early townships formed in Huron County and the Firelands. The village was platted, with streets at right angles around a diamond-shaped town green, after the plan of New Haven, Connecticut. When, in the 1840s, New Haven rejected the railroad’s direct route through the village, the Sandusky & Newark was routed to the west and through Plymouth taking with it the shipping business. Subsequently, New Haven began a steady economic decline into a small crossroads village.

5847 Sunbury Road
Westerville

, OH

This brick home was built in 1856 by John McDannald, son of Samuel and Bell (Craig) McDannald who came from Virginia in 1813. The McDannalds were prominent in the development of Blendon Township, The Central College of Ohio, and The Central College Presbyterian Church. This house served as one station on the Ohio Underground Railroad.

Damascus Cemetery, Valley Road
Salem but located in Damascus

, OH

On this site are re-interred 118 exhumed remains from Lot 17, Friends Burying Grounds, adjacent to Damascus Friends Church on Walnut Street. Among those re-interred here are: Catlit Jones, a scout with Quaker Daniel Boone in Kentucky, a captain in the Revolutionary War, and a recorded Friends minister; and Samuel Coppock Jr., father of Edwin Coppock, who was hanged in 1859 for his part in abolitionist John Brown’s raid on the United States Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. The exhumation (2001-2002) was directed by Prof. Dr. John White of Youngstown State University, assisted by staff, students, and volunteers.

13526 Hackett Road
Apple Creek (Kidron)

, OH

In the summer of 1819 settlers from Sonnenberg in the Jura Mountains of Canton Bern, Switzerland arrived in Wayne County, Ohio. They fled the religious persecution they endured because of their Anabaptist-Mennonite beliefs, including adult baptism and the separation of church and state. Ulrich Lehman, Johannes Amstutz, and the families of Peter and Barbara (Bogli) Lehman, David and Barbara (Thuller) Kirchhofer, Isaac and Katharina (Lehman) Sommer purchased 320 acres about two miles northeast of Kidron, centered near the intersection of Zuercher and Hackett roads, and began new lives. Their families and their faith continue to flourish in the Kidron-Sonnenberg area.

OH 308
Gambier

, OH

The state’s oldest private institution of higher education, Kenyon College was founded in 1824 in Worthington by Philander Chase, first Episcopal bishop of Ohio, and relocated to Gambier four years later. Both college and village are named for British benefactors, statesman Lord Kenyon and naval hero Lord Gambier. Throughout its history, Kenyon has prepared men and women for leading roles in society, including nineteenth-century graduates Edwin M. Stanton, Abraham Lincoln’s secretary of war, and Rutherford B. Hayes, Ohio governor and U.S. president. In the twentieth century, Kenyon educated such literary luminaries as poet Robert Lowell and novelist E.L. Doctorow. Kenyon has also been an innovator in education-the Advanced Placement Program began as the Kenyon Plan in the 1950s.

134 North Washington St.
Greenfield

, OH

The factory of the C. R. Patterson & Sons Company once stood near here at 138 N. Washington Street. Established in the mid-nineteenth century by the black businessman Charles Richard (C. R.) Patterson and his white partner, J. P. Lowe, the business, originally known as J. P. Lowe & Company, became a successful carriage firm. Patterson became the sole owner in 1893 and changed the name to C. R. Patterson & Sons. After succeeding his father as owner, C. R.’s son, Frederick, became the first known African-American automobile manufacturer. Under his leadership, the company transitioned from building carriages to automobiles, then to trucks and buses to keep up with the changing demands of the transportation industry. (Continued on other side)

8410 Lincoln Street SE
East Canton

, OH

Golfer and World War II veteran William J. Powell, excluded from playing on many American golf courses because of his race, overcame the indignity of discrimination by creating his own course. Hand built in two years and opened in 1948, Clearview Golf Club is the first golf course in the United States designed, built, and owned by an African-American. The acclaimed course harmonizes with the landscape and bears many design elements of traditional British courses. A triumph of perseverance over discrimination, Clearview represents the historic postwar era when athletes first broke the “color line” in American sports.

101 S Main St
New Knoxville

, OH

The history of New Knoxville provides one of the best examples of chain migration to America. After the Shawnee were removed from what would become Auglaize County, James Knox Lytle, cousin to James Knox Polk, purchased land in Washington Township. Lytle platted a village of 102 lots in 1836, calling it Knoxville to honor his mother’s family. Meanwhile, newly married Wilhelm and Elisabeth Fledderjohann Kuckhermann (later Kuck) immigrated from Ladbergen in northwest Germany. Having missed their boat to St. Louis, the couple lived briefly in Stallostown (Minster) and Bremen (New Bremen). They wrote home, encouraging others to emigrate; in the summer of 1835 the Fledderjohanns (Elisabeth’s family), Meckstroths, and Lutterbecks arrived. The families bought land near the site of Knoxville. (continued on other side)