Remarkable Ohio

Results for: hamilton
1801 Race Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Findlay Market is the heart of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood and has been a gathering place for political, religious, and social events since opening in 1855. Inspired by the Cincinnati Reds World Championship in 1919, a group of fans –“rooters” – from Findlay Market organized a parade to celebrate the start of the team’s 1920 season. The parade became an annual event, with marching bands, horse-drawn “Tally-Ho” wagons and rooters processioning to Redland and later Crosley Field, where they presented gifts to Reds officials. (Continued on other side)

100 Joe Nuxhall Way
Cincinnati

, OH

Findlay Market is the heart of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood and has been a gathering place for political, religious, and social events since opening in 1855. Inspired by the Cincinnati Reds World Championship in 1919, a group of fans – “Rooters” – from Findlay Market organized a parade to celebrate the state of the team’s 1920 season. The parade became an annual event, with marching bands, horse-drawn “Tally-Ho” wagons and rooters processioning to Redland and later Crosley Field, where they presented gifts to Reds officials. (Continued on other side)

49 East 4th Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The Cincinnati Stock Exchange (CSE), founded in 1885, was headquartered in the Dixie Terminal Building at 49 East 4th Street. The CSE emerged as an innovator in stock trading when it started the nation’s first computerized stock exchange in 1976, allowing brokers to execute customer orders directly through their CSE National Securities Trading System data terminals. Computerization revolutionized stock exchanges domestically and then globally, as computers accepted, matched, and executed orders for stocks automatically, eliminating manual processing. The New York Stock Exchange acquired the CSE in 2017.

400 Chestnut Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Chestnut Street Cemetery is the first Jewish cemetery in Ohio and the earliest west of the Allegheny Mountains. It was established in 1821 when Nicholas Longworth sold land to Joseph Jonas, David I. Johnson, Morris Moses, Moses Nathan, Abraham Jonas, and Solomon Moses for $75 as a “burying ground.” Benjamin Lape (or Leib) was the first buried there with Jewish rites. The purchase of the original plot marks the beginning of an organized Jewish community in the Queen City. Chestnut Street Cemetery, although enlarged by adjacent purchases, closed in 1849 when cholera ravaged the city and filled available space. In all, there are approximately 100 interments on the site. Jewish Cemeteries of Greater Cincinnati maintains Chestnut Street Cemetery as well as many other Jewish cemeteries in the region.

1010 Chapel Street
Cincinnati

, OH

“Lifting As We Climb”: The Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs (CFCWC) was organized May 6, 1904, during a meeting called by Mary Fletcher Ross at the Allen Temple A.M.E. Church. Gathering together eight existing African-American women’s clubs, the CFCWC sought to unite in their work promoting “the betterment of the community.” At a time when both government and private philanthropies overlooked the needs of Black Americans, CFCWC members helped to organize the city’s first kindergartens for Black children, taught in Cincinnati African-American public schools –including the Walnut Hills Douglass and Stowe schools—and raised money for the Home of Aged Colored Women. Since 1904, the Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs has ensured the civic and constitutional rights of all African Americans while meeting the needs of their city.

2100 Duck Creek Road
Cincinnati

, OH

James W. Rankin served four consecutive terms (1971-1978) in the Ohio House of Representatives. Born and raised in Cincinnati, he graduated from Withrow High School and The Ohio State University’s School of Social Work. While working in Cincinnati’s Seven Hills neighborhood, he ran for office to “involve the disadvantaged in the governmental processes that affected their lives.” He won his first bid and served the next seven years as a state representative for the 69th House district, later the reapportioned 25th district. Representative Rankin fought passionately for civil and human rights in education and public policy. He served on the Reference, Human Resources, and Finance committees. When Rankin died of pneumonia, aged 52, the Cincinnati Enquirer proclaimed him a “Friend of the Poor.”

3640 Roll Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Sarah Mayrant Walker was born enslaved in Charleston, South Carolina, and sent to New Orleans as a young girl to study under a French hair specialist in the art of hair and scalp treatment, and goods manufacturing. Brought to Cincinnati around 1840, she used her networks to build a hair salon empire that catered to elite and wealthy women. In 1859, Sarah single-handedly desegregated the Cincinnati streetcars when she successfully sued The Passenger Railroad Company after a conductor refused her passage and pushed her off the moving car. As a result, Black women and children could ride inside a streetcar while men could ride on the platform. She and her husband, Peter Fossett, founded First Baptist Church of Cumminsville circa 1870. Both are buried in the Union Baptist Cemetery.

325 W. Eighth Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The Cathedral of St. Peter In Chains has ministered to Catholics in Ohio for more than 175 years. In 1840, Bishop John Baptist Purcell recognized the need for a cathedral to serve his growing catholic immigrant community and asked architect Henry Walter to draw up designs in neo-classic Greek style. The cornerstone was laid in 1841 and the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains was dedicated November 2, 1845. It was promptly nicknamed the “White Angel” for its white marble façade. Abandoned in 1938 due to deteriorating conditions, it was renovated during the 1950s, and rededicated as the cathedral on November 3, 1957. The Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The Pope designated it a Minor Basilica in 2020.