Remarkable Ohio

Results for: hamilton
2038 Auburn Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Born here on September 15, 1857, William Howard Taft is the only American to have served as President and Chief Justice of the United States. His unique career of public service began after he graduated from Yale University and Cincinnati Law School. He became an Ohio Superior Court Judge at age 29. In 1892, he was appointed a judge of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1900, President William McKinley sent him to the Philippines as chief civil administrator. President Theodore Roosevelt named him Secretary of War in 1904, and he was elected president of the United States four years later. In 1921, President Harding named Taft Chief Justice, a position that he relished, serving until just before his death in 1930.

3101 Clifton Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Hebrew Union College (HUC), founded in Cincinnati in 1875, is the oldest institution of higher Jewish learning in the United States. Its founder, Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise (1819-1900), was a leading proponent of Reform Judaism in America. In 1950, the college merged with the Jewish Institute of Religion (JIR), a liberal Jewish seminary in New York founded by Rabbi Stephen S. Wise (1874-1949) in 1922. A third center opened in Los Angeles in 1954 to serve Jewry on the West Coast and, in 1963, a fourth campus opened in Jerusalem. As of 2003, HUC-JIR educates rabbis, cantors, communal, and educational professionals. It also offers advanced academic training for scholars of all faiths. The holdings of the school’s Klau Library constitute one of the most extensive Jewish libraries in the world.

3101 Clifton Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Dr. Jacob Rader Marcus (1896-1995), pioneering historian of the American Jew, founded the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in Cincinnati in 1947. In the aftermath of World War II and the brutal destruction of European Jewry, Marcus anticipated the need to establish a central repository dedicated to preserving the history of North American Jewry. The AJA, which began with a few boxes of documents, has become one of the world’s largest catalogued collections of primary source material on the history of American Jewry. An international community of scholars, researchers, and students utilizes the AJA’s vast archival holdings.

250 yards south of 23 Washington Street
North Bend

, OH

William Henry Harrison (1773-1841), ninth president of the United States, left his home state of Virginia in 1791 and was commissioned in the 1st Regiment of Infantry. After his resignation from the army, he became Secretary of the Northwest Territory. In 1801, Harrison became governor of the recently created Indiana Territory. During the War of 1812, he was given command of the Army of the Northwest, defeating combined British and Native American forces at the Battle of the Thames. Harrison lived here following the War of 1812. He turned to politics while living in North Bend and represented Ohio in the United States Congress for two terms. In the presidential election of 1840, the Whigs capitalized on Harrison’s fame as a military hero and nominated him to run against incumbent Democrat Martin Van Buren. Shortly after his lengthy inaugural address, Harrison developed pneumonia. He died on April 4, 1841, and his body was returned to North Bend for burial.

4933 Cleves Warsaw Pike
Cincinnati

, OH

Born in Richmond, Virginia, Powhatan Beaty moved to Cincinnati in 1849, where he spent the majority of his life. Beaty enlisted as a private in the Union Army in June 1863, and two days later was promoted to first sergeant, Company G, 5th United States Colored Troops (USCT). All the officers of Company G were killed or wounded during an attack on Confederate forces at New Market Heights, Virginia, in September 1864. Beaty took command of his company, and for his valor received the Congressional Medal of Honor. Beaty was one of two African-Americans buried in Ohio to receive the Medal of Honor for service in the Civil War. He died on December 6, 1916, leaving two sons, attorney and state representative A. Lee Beaty and John W. Beaty. He is buried in Union Baptist Cemetery along with nearly 150 USCT veterans.

6000 Mariemont Drive
Mariemont

, OH

The Madisonville site is the largest and most thoroughly studied village of the late Fort Ancient culture (AD 1450 – 1670). Artifacts were so abundant here that local residents called this site the “pottery field.” Between 1879 and 1911, a generation of Harvard archaeologists trained at this site. Dr. Charles Metz, assisted by Harvard University’s Frederic Ward Putnam, excavated the remains of numerous houses, storage pits, and burials. The presence of glass beads and bits from iron kettles indicates these villagers may have been among the first native Ohioans to learn of the coming of Europeans to America. Mariemont street names Cachepit, Midden, Flintpoint, and Hammerstone, are reminders of these earlier residents. The pavilion was designed by the noted town planner John Nolen in 1921, but not constructed and dedicated until 2001.

, OH

The Covington-Cincinnati Bridge Company under the leadership of Amos Shinkle built the first Ohio River bridge linking the North and South following the Civil War. The bridge was privately operated until purchased in 1955 by Kentucky and later renamed the “John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge.” Completed in 1866, this National Civil Engineering Landmark was the only bridge in service over the Ohio River during the 1937 flood. Since 1976, its national and local heritage has been commemorated with beautification lighting and flags sponsored by the citizens and institutions for which the bridge stands as a community symbol. (Continued on other side)

800 Vine Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Among the first in America, Cincinnati’s public library dates from March 14, 1853. A public reading room opened in 1856, but funding remained a problem until 1867, when local school board president Rufus King II secured legislation for a renamed Cincinnati Public Library. In 1869, King lured leading librarian William Frederick Poole to organize Cincinnati as a national model for the growing public library movement. Poole designed 19th century America’s most advanced library at 629 Vine Street, which fully opened in 1874. Becoming a countywide system in 1898, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County was a pioneer in the 20th century with special services for the blind and for children, bookmobile services, and circulation of audiovisual materials. (continued on other side)