Remarkable Ohio

Results for: historical-home
Brown Street near 3rd Street
Belmont

, OH

The last barn painter for the Bloch Brothers Tobacco Company of Wheeling, West Virginia, Harley Warrick painted thousands of barns with the familiar Mail Pouch Tobacco logo over his 48-year career. Mail Pouch transcended advertising to become a fixture of nostalgic Americana, emblazoning barns across fifteen states with the “Midwestern imperative”: Chew Mail Pouch Tobacco-Treat Yourself to the Best. Once a common form of advertising through the early 20th century, barn painting became the sole province of Mail Pouch in this region by mid-century. The Highway Beautification Act of 1965 restricted roadside advertising, and in 1969 Bloch Brothers curtailed its program, retaining Warrick to refinish barns for their historical value until his retirement in 1993.

203 North Depot Street
Stryker

, OH

Like many nineteenth century communities in Ohio, Stryker owes its birth and early growth to the railroad industry. Stryker, named for Rome, New York, attorney and railroad executive John Stryker, was surveyed on September 19, 1853, beside the proposed Northern Indiana Railroad. For more than fifty years, “track pans” at Stryker allowed steam locomotives to take on 5,000 gallons of water while traveling at forty to fifty miles per hour, saving valuable time, “the principal enemy of railroad schedules.” On July 23, 1966, the U.S. rail speed record of 183.85 miles per hour was set through Williams County, including through Stryker. The Stryker depot was constructed in 1900 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 7, 1989. (continued on other side)

9999 E Bayshore Road
Lakeside Marblehead

, OH

Built in 1822, this native limestone structure was the home of Benajah Wolcott, first keeper of the Marblehead Lighthouse (originally called the Sandusky Bay Light), and his second wife, Rachel Miller Wolcott. Benajah maintained the lighthouse from 1822 until his death ten years later. After Benajah’s passing the U.S. Government appointed Rachel as the keeper, making her the first female lighthouse keeper on the Great Lakes. The building is the oldest known residence still standing in Ottawa County and is a fine example of a “hall-and-parlor house,” an early American home design.

SE corner of Lincoln Highway and Pollock Road
Convoy

, OH

This is the gravesite of Robert Nesbitt, an immigrant from Convoy, Ireland who named Convoy, Ohio after his home town. In 2010, the Convoy Community Foundation, Convoy Lions Club, Convoy Business Association, and Convoy Community Days, Inc. raised the funds to restore Nesbitt’s tombstone. A representative from Convoy, Ireland – Ray Bonar – attended the rededication ceremony on July 4, 2010. The Van Wert County Historical Society took over the care of the grave site, which is in the Sugar Ridge Cemetery. The cemetery has been under the care of the Tully Township Trustees since its foundation.

Between 1717 and 1739 N Fountain Blvd
Springfield

, OH

The Ridgewood neighborhood, platted in 1914, was one of the first fully planned and restricted suburbs in the United States. Its innovative developer, Springfield native Harry S. Kissell, was among a small group of nationally-acclaimed real estate developers who, in the early twentieth century, created the modern suburb as we know it today. Their developments offered spacious lots in park-like settings; curvilinear, paved roads; utilities, and sewers. They also ushered in the practice of deed restrictions, which were both protective and exclusionary. Harry Kissell went on to become president of the National Association of Real Estate Boards in 1931. During his tenure, he conceived the idea for the Federal Home Loan Banking system, which, during the Great Depression, saved millioins of Americans from foreclosure and permanently opened up the possibility of home ownership to the middle class.

Lewis Center Rd.
Delaware

, OH

Samuel Patterson arrived in East Orange in 1824 and, within a few years, began to hide runaway slaves in his home. He also invited anti-slavery speakers to the pulpit of the East Orange Methodist Church, which brought Patterson and his neighbors into conflict with the bishop. Following their consciences, they became Wesleyan Methodists and built a new church. A pro-slavery neighbor mocked them by calling their community Africa, and so East Orange was renamed. The village has disappeared, but several homes owned by Patterson and his neighbors still stand in this vicinity.

Just N of 64 N Culver Street
Logan

, OH

Born in 1886 on a farm near Logan, Tessa Sweazy Webb was a teacher at the Hocking County Children’s Home where she began writing poetry. By 1924 she had become well known across the state and nation for her published works. Under Webb’s successful leadership and effort, the Ohio legislature passed a resolution in 1938 calling for an annual state observance of Ohio Poetry Day. Webb’s work in Ohio was responsible for all fifty states observing Poetry Day. She received the Ohioana Award in 1942 for Window by the Sea, chosen as the best book of verse by an Ohio poet. In 1961, the Ohioana Library issued a citation citing her devotion to making Ohioans aware of Ohio Poetry Day. Webb died in 1979 in Logan at the age of 93.

Boardman Township Park, 375 Boardman-Poland Road
Boardman

, OH

The first home of the oldest Episcopal parish in the Connecticut Western Reserve, the St. James Episcopal Church was built between 1827 and 1828. Philander Chase, first Bishop of the Diocese of Ohio, consecrated it in 1829. The belfry and steeple were added in 1881. It was moved to this site from its original Market Street location in 1972 after the parish built a new church. Renamed the St. James Meeting House, it is the anchor of a community of historic buildings that includes the Beardsley-Walter-Diehm House (circa 1828), the Oswald Detchon House (circa 1840), and the Schiller-Chuey Summer Kitchen. The oldest known structure in Boardman, the St. James Meeting House was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.