Remarkable Ohio

Results for: william-mckinley
17751 Chillicothe Road
Chagrin Falls, Bainbridge Township

, OH

Bainbridge Center Historic District. Founded in 1817, Bainbridge Township was named for Commodore William Bainbridge, commander of the USS Constitution during the War of 1812. The unincorporated hamlet of Bainbridge Center is both the geographic and historic center of Bainbridge Township. The town hall, churches, stores, shops, a school, and post office were established in Bainbridge Center. The architecture of houses in the area, most notably those built during the Greek revival period, reflects the agricultural past of the community and its development in the twentieth century. Citizens gathered in The Center to attend church and school, shop, and participate in social and political functions.

Clyde

, OH

Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941), author of 27 works, gave up a successful business career in Elyria, Ohio, to concentrate on writing. Born in Camden, Anderson spent his formative years (1884-1895) in Clyde, and in 1919 he published his most notable book, Winesburg, Ohio. Clyde and small-town Ohio inspired many of its tales. Critics also praised his short story collections, including The Triumph of the Egg (1921) and Death in the Woods (1933). Commercially successful as a writer, Anderson moved to rural Virginia, where in 1927 he purchased and operated two newspapers while continuing his literary career. Through his writings and encouragement he was a major influence to a younger generation of writers, including William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, and John Steinbeck. Sherwood Anderson is buried in Marion, Virginia.

OH 38 NE
Bloomingburg

, OH

The Bloomingburg Presbyterian Church and cemetery were established in the northwest corner of the current cemetery grounds on March 7, 1818. Several years later it became a center for anti-slavery activity. The Reverend William Dickey, who presided over the church and other members, devoted their lives to the anti-slavery cause not only in voice but also in abolitionist activity. By the mid-1800s, their work, as well as the fact that Bloomingburg had become home to a vibrant African American community, led to the town becoming the area center for the Underground Railroad, which helped transport many fugitive slaves to freedom in the north. Six soldiers from the American Revolutionary War, nineteen from the War of 1812, and over 100 from the Civil War and Spanish-American War are buried in the Bloomingburg Cemetery, including Henry Casey, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his valor at Vicksburg.

1031 River Road
Maumee

, OH

This federal style house was built in 1827 by James A. Wolcott who migrated to Ohio in 1818 from Connecticut. Of distinguished parentage, Wolcott was a leading merchant, shipbuilder, judge and politician. Here he and his wife, Mary Wells, daughter of scout William Wells and Sweet Breeze, Indian Chief Little Turtle’s daughter, made their home a center of frontier activity. This house stands as a tangible symbol of this Maumee pioneer, a Registered National Historic Place.

Hubbard House Underground Railroad Museum, 1603 Walnut Blvd
Ashtabula

, OH

Built in the 1840s by William and Catharine Hubbard and known as “Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard” or “The Great Emporium” by fugitive slaves, the Hubbard House was an important terminus on the fabled Underground Railroad in the years before the Civil War. The Hubbard House sheltered escaped slaves who had risked life and limb after crossing the Ohio River into the North. From the Hubbard home, slaves walked one-quarter mile to the Hubbard and Company warehouse on the Ashtabula River, where friendly boat captains awaited to ferry their passengers to Canada and freedom. The U.S. Department of the Interior listed the Hubbard House on its National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

703 Tyler Street
Sandusky

, OH

Good Samaritan Hospital was formed for the purpose of maintaining and operating an institution for the sick and injured. Under the direction of Rev. William W. Farr and Mr. C.C. Keech, the cornerstone was laid June 27, 1876. The hospital was established to be universal in its activities and benefactors and not to be under the control of any religious body or civic organization.

SE corner of OH 58 and OH 162
Huntington

, OH

Myron T. Herrick, Governor of Ohio from 1904 to 1906, was born in Huntington Township in 1854 and lived here until age 12. A respected Cleveland attorney and businessman, Herrick was a friend and confidant to Senator Mark Hanna and Presidents McKinley, Taft, and Harding. His public service career culminated in two appointments as ambassador to France, from 1912 through the outbreak of World War I in 1914, and again from 1921 until his death in 1929. Enormously popular with the French people, Herrick escorted Charles Lindbergh in Paris after his historic 1927 transatlantic flight.

318 Main Street
Coshocton

, OH

In 1764, Colonel Henry Bouquet established the site of what is now Coshocton. In 1811, the county was founded and the town incorporated as the county seat. The Coshocton County Courthouse, the third on this site, was built between 1873 and 1875 by contractors Carpenter and Williams of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The Second Empire structure features a five-story tower containing a four-faced clock and the bell from the previous 1824 courthouse. The courthouse contains a notable mural by artist Arthur William Woelfle depicting the signing of Bouquet’s treaty with the Indians near the Walhonding River in November 1764. The Coshocton County Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.