Results for: space-flight
J. W. Denver Williams Memorial Park, 1100 Rombach Avenue
Wilmington

, OH

On April 18, 1964, reservists from the 302nd Troop Carrier Wing at the Clinton County Air Force Base (CCAFB) and 2nd Special Forces Group (Green Berets) of Fort Hayes, Columbus were to undergo an Operational Readiness Inspection. In a flight of nine C-119 “Flying Boxcars,” the men were to execute a routine night formation paratroop drop. Airborne, the flight encountered worsening weather conditions and the lead plane called off the mission. Returning to CCAFB, two C-119s collided in mid-air and crashed about five miles northeast of the base, near the intersection of Stone and Melvin roads. Tragically, 17 of the 19 men aboard were killed.(Continued on other side)

1395 Pearl Road
Brunswick

, OH

The Rev. Jacob Ward founded the Brunswick Methodist Episcopal Church in April 1817 with 13 members: Rhoda Stow, John and Lucy Stearns, John and Hannah Hulet, Samuel and Sarah Tillotson, Thomas and Phoebe Stearns, Solomon and Polly Harvey, Lydia Crittenden, and Olivia Ashley. In 1830, John and Lucy Stearns donated land for a cemetery, which included space for a church. A new church was completed in 1872. Bricks used for the building were fired locally and the first windows were glazed with clear glass and protected by shutters. In 1916, the church was extensively remodeled and redecorated. Stained glass replaced the clear glass, the church bell was relocated to the newly-added tower, and the main entrance was moved from the center of the building to the vestibule in the tower. (Continued on other side)

1225 Mount Vernon Avenue
Marion

, OH

The Marion Mausoleum represents a time in early 20th-century America in which burial practices changed because of advances in engineering and construction materials, concerns about hygiene, and a new rise in wealth among the middle class. Exhibiting elements of the Neo-Classical Revival and Prairie architectural styles, construction of the sandstone building began in 1906. The mausoleum opened to the public in 1916. The interior is comprised of marble and concrete. Furnishings include chandeliers, wool carpeting, and wrought iron furniture. Stained-glass windows admit natural light. Two windows feature an upside-down torch with a still-burning flame, which symbolizes a belief in eternal spiritual life after death and burial. The mausoleum has space for 383 internments. As of 2016, it is supported and maintained by a perpetual care fund.

161 High Street
Wadsworth

, OH

The Johnson House was built in 1852 and its first owner was Henry J. Traver (1827-1911), owner of Traver & Company carriage factory across the street. From 1877 until 1994 the house was the residence and office of four doctors who maintained their practices there. The first was Dr. Daniel Cranz (1854 — 1914); followed by Dr. Thomas Ritter (1855—1928). In 1900, Dr. Robert Johnson (1878 — 1952) purchased the house. His daughter Dr. Myra Johnson (1909 — 1994) took over the practice after he died and until she retired in 1976. After her death, the house was converted into a museum. It is operated by the Wadsworth Area Historical Society and owned by the City of Wadsworth. (Continued on other side)

19 Water Street
Milford

, OH

The Milford Public Library, Clermont County’s oldest continuously operating library, was founded in 1900 by a local civic organization, the Milford Village Improvement Society. It was preceded by a circulating library–one that charges patrons for renting books–that was chartered in 1822. At the time of the Milford Public Library’s founding, circulating libraries were in decline and public libraries were increasing in number as an inexpensive alternative. To obtain support for their proposed “reading room,” the Society’s Literary Committee travelled door-to-door, soliciting members and books. To become a member of the library, adults paid 25 cents and children paid 10 cents in annual dues. The library’s first–and current–home is the stone building at 19 Water Street. (Continued on other side)

14588 W Park Street
Burton

, OH

This Queen Anne style building with segmental-arched windows and steep hipped roof was Burton’s second high school. Completed in 1885 at a cost of $12,500, it is wood framed with a brick and stone exterior, modeled after an academy in River Falls, Wisconsin. Its basement and two upper floors contained 12,720 square feet of space, enough for all twelve grades. There were two separate entrances; girls entered on the left and boys on the right. Electricity was installed in 1921 by the superintendent and students. Classes met here until 1936. During its history, the building housed various organizations, including the Red Cross, Opportunity School of Geauga County (later Metzenbaum), Geauga County Historical Society, American Legion, and County Extension Office. In 1937, it became the home of the Burton Public Library and in 1983 was expanded with a north wing designed to be architecturally consistent with the original 1885 structure.

8405 Main Street
Kinsman

, OH

This eight-sided house reflects a widespread pre-Civil War architectural fad. Promoted by phrenologist Orson S. Fowler in his 1848 book A Home for All as a way to “bring comfortable homes within the reach of the poorer classes,” the octagon made efficient use of interior space and natural ventilation. More than thirty octagonal houses are known to have been built in Ohio, and at least twenty-five survive. This example was built circa 1854 and purchased by cabinetmaker Amirus Darrow in 1864. The exterior walls are constructed of chestnut beams between layers of concrete. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

229 Mill Street
Middleport

, OH

General James V. Hartinger, 1925-2000, was born in Middleport, Ohio, and graduated from Middleport High School in 1943. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1949 and was a career-long fighter pilot with the United States Air Force, flying every type of fighter craft the Air Force procured during his 35 years of active duty. He saw military action during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Named commander-in-chief of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) in Colorado Springs in 1979, he was promoted to four stars and became the “founding father” of Air Force Space Command. The headquarters building of Air Force Space Command is named the James V. Hartinger Building in his honor and the Hartinger Medal is awarded annually for extraordinary achievement in space.