Results for: space-flight
400 Chestnut Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Chestnut Street Cemetery is the first Jewish cemetery in Ohio and the earliest west of the Allegheny Mountains. It was established in 1821 when Nicholas Longworth sold land to Joseph Jonas, David I. Johnson, Morris Moses, Moses Nathan, Abraham Jonas, and Solomon Moses for $75 as a “burying ground.” Benjamin Lape (or Leib) was the first buried there with Jewish rites. The purchase of the original plot marks the beginning of an organized Jewish community in the Queen City. Chestnut Street Cemetery, although enlarged by adjacent purchases, closed in 1849 when cholera ravaged the city and filled available space. In all, there are approximately 100 interments on the site. Jewish Cemeteries of Greater Cincinnati maintains Chestnut Street Cemetery as well as many other Jewish cemeteries in the region.

1979 West 25th Street
Cleveland

, OH

Since opening in 1912, the West Side Market, Cleveland’s oldest continuously operating, municipally-owned market, has been an anchor to the historic Ohio City neighborhood. Built to replace the Pearl Street Market and the Central Market. All three served Cleveland’s growing population in the early 20th century, but only the West Side Market remains. Designed by architects W. Dominick Benes and Benjamin Hubbell, the 30,000 square foot space has a dramatic vaulted Guastavino tile ceiling and a signature clock tower that is 137 feet high. The Seth Thomas clock Company manufactured the clock. (Continued on other side)

1979 West 25th Street
Cleveland

, OH

Since opening in 1912, the West Side Market, Cleveland’s oldest continuously operating, municipally-owned market, has been an anchor to the historic Ohio City neighborhood. Built to replace the Pearl Street Market and the Central Market. All three served Cleveland’s growing population in the early 20th century, but only the West Side Market remains. Designed by architects W. Dominick Benes and Benjamin Hubbell, the 30,000 square foot space has a dramatic vaulted Guastavino tile ceiling and a signature clock tower that is 137 feet high. The Seth Thomas clock Company manufactured the clock. (Continued on other side)

Brookside Stadium, 4460 Denison Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

For more than 120 years, the natural amphitheater of Brookside Stadium has been a place of recreation for visitors to enjoy community events, festivals, and even a concert by John Philip Sousa. Engineered by William Stinchcomb, chief architect of the Cleveland Metroparks, Brookside Stadium officially opened as a premier space for sandlot baseball in May 1909. As amateur baseball found increased esteem, both locally and nationally, Brookside Stadium regularly became popular with thousands of spectators. On Sunday, October 10, 1915, it was host to the National Inter-City Amateur Championship, during which a crowd of an estimated 115,000 people witnessed the White Autos beat the Omaha Luxus 11 to 6. Although there was no formal ticketing system to verify the exact attendance, photographs taken that day strongly suggest that Brookside Stadium hosted the largest crowd in amateur baseball history.

Brookside Stadium, 4460 Denison Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

For more than 120 years, the natural amphitheater of Brookside Stadium has been a place of recreation for visitors to enjoy community events, festivals, and even a concert by John Philip Sousa. Engineered by William Stinchcomb, chief architect of the Cleveland Metroparks, Brookside Stadium officially opened as a premier space for sandlot baseball in May 1909. As amateur baseball found increased esteem, both locally and nationally, Brookside Stadium regularly became popular with thousands of spectators. On Sunday, October 10, 1915, it was host to the National Inter-City Amateur Championship, during which a crowd of an estimated 115,000 people witnessed the White Autos beat the Omaha Luxus 11 to 6. Although there was no formal ticketing system to verify the exact attendance, photographs taken that day strongly suggest that Brookside Stadium hosted the largest crowd in amateur baseball history.

Clague Park at Roman Road and Clague Rd
Westlake

, OH

Marine Colonel Robert F. Overmyer was born July 14, 1936 in Lorain, but always considered Westlake, where his family had lived since 1941, to be his hometown. He graduated from Westlake High School in 1954. After earning a bachelor’s degree in physics from Baldwin Wallace College in 1957, he entered active duty in the Marine Corps in 1958. He completed Navy flight training and was assigned to Marine Attack Squadron 214 in 1959. Overmyer logged over 7,500 flight hours, with more than 6,000 of those in jet aircraft. After earning a master’s degree in aeronautics from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1964, he was chosen as an astronaut for the USAF Manned Orbiting Laboratory Program in 1966. (Continued on other side)

3 Public Square
Cleveland

, OH

Abraham Lincoln visted Cleveland twice; once in life and the other in death. The first visit was on February 15-16, 1861, while in route to his presidential inauguration. The second, more solem visit was on April 28, 1865. Cleveland was one of twelve citiels to host a scheduled public viewing of the assassinated president’s remains. In addition to local officials, Lincoln’s cortege included a military escort of then current and former Union officers who were veterans of the Civil War. These officers would form the early membership of the organization known as the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. (continued on other side)

Columbia Rd & Water St
Olmsted Falls

, OH

In 1795, the Connecticut Land Company auctioned twenty-five square miles of land known as Plum Creek Township. Aaron Olmsted, a sea captain, purchased almost half of the property. Although Olmsted died before ever seeing his land, in 1829, his son Charles offered to donate books to the area in exchange for changing the settlement’s name from Lenox to Olmsted. In 1815, shoemaker James Geer and his family became the first permanent American residents to settle in the southern end of the area. Geer’s farm was on what is now Columbia Road.