Remarkable Ohio

Results for: log-cabins
17769 Fowles Road
Middleburg Heights

, OH

Woodvale Cemetery was established in the mid-1800s, in Middleburgh Township, Ohio. The oldest marked grave holds Fred G. Klink (1835-1858), whose family donated a half acre of land for burials. In 1876, Frank M. Stearns (1832-1911) suggested the unnamed cemetery be called Woodvale, after the wooded vale beside it. In 1908, a fire destroyed the caretaker’s house and many cemetery records. Woodvale became a non-profit, union cemetery in 1931, owned by Berea and the Village of Middleburg Hts. and covering 35 acres at 7535 Engle Road. Pioneer families buried here: Fowles, Kraft, Lovejoy, Sprague, and Stearns. Also buried here: John Baldwin (1799-1884) founder of Baldwin University and James Wallace (1878-1953) founder of German Wallace College (merged in 1913 to become Baldwin Wallace College) (Continued other side)

29535 Center Ridge Rd
Westlake

, OH

Born in Connecticut in 1794, Leverett Johnson came to Dover Township with his brother-in-law and sister, Asahel and Rebecca Johnson Porter on October 10, 1810. In 1811 at the age of 16, he began clearing land in what is now Westlake. In 1814 he built a log house at Porter and Center Ridge roads for his bride Abigail Cahoon. They raised nine children and lived here the rest of their lives. Johnson was a prominent citizen of Dover Township, serving as a justice of the peace, a township treasurer and trustee, a Cuyahoga County commissioner and a five-term Ohio state legislator, and as the first director of Dover Academy, a local school. Leverett died on April 19, 1856 at home. He donated part of his land for Evergreen Cemetery, where he, Abigail, and many of the pioneers of Westlake are buried.

5757 Broadview Road
Parma

, OH

The Henninger Homestead was founded in an era when local quarries provided raw materials for the construction of the Ohio and Erie Canal. Bavarian immigrants Philip and Sophia Henninger came to Parma Township in 1840. Although Philip was a skilled tinsmith, he soon established a quarry on his property to supply sandstone for the breakwall of Cleveland’s harbor in Lake Erie, canal locks, and other building projects. In 1849, the Henningers replaced their log home with this Greek Revival house using stone from their quarry. Blocks at its base measure 30″ thick while upper walls are 14″ thick. Abandoned in 1988, the site was saved from demolition in 2003. The house and nearby carriage barn stand as the oldest buildings in the City of Parma.

26900 Cook Road
Olmsted Township

, OH

The community of Olmsted commemorated its bicentennial in 2014. In 1795, the Connecticut Land Company auctioned a tract of land called Township 6, Range 15. Almost half the northern side was purchased by Aaron Olmsted, though he would die before seeing the land. In 1814, James Geer cleared a plot in the southeastern corner of the township to grow corn. He built a log house and moved his family there. Originally called Kingston, the township was renamed Lenox in 1823. In 1829, the settlement became Olmsted; in return, Aaron Olmsted’s son Charles donated 500 books for the creation of a community library.

5993 Pearl Road
Parma Heights

, OH

The cemetery has been the final resting place of area residents since the 1820s. Settlers from New York and New England migrated here in the 1810s and 1820s. First called “Greenbrier,” the area took the name Parma after the township was organized in 1826. A log building at the cemetery’s north end stood from 1826 to 1841 and served as a township school, public meeting place, and church. The cemetery’s small sandstone vault was erected in 1892. After voters established Parma Heights village in 1911, the Parma Heights Cemetery Improvement Association formed to care for the grounds. (Continued on other side)