Results for: log-cabins
3518 St. Lawrence Drive
Toledo

, OH

Near this site scout Peter Navarre built in 1807 a log cabin close by an Ottawa Indian Village of 60 whitewashed cabins. Here he maintained friendly relations between white settlers and Chief Autokee. The 1833 Treaty of Maumee gave 320 acres of this region to the Indians who later sold the isle for $1,000. Presque Isle is now at the heart of Port of Toledo activity.

Across from 7031 W. Frederick-Garland Rd
West Milton

, OH

To Commemorate the first church erected in Union Township, Miami County, Ohio, this log replica was constructed in 1976 by the Union Township 4-H Clubs and the West Milton area Camp Fire Girls. The Laura Lions Club established this historic marker which stands on the site of the West Branch Quaker Burial Grounds near the location of the original church.

4545 County Rd 114
Sugarcreek

, OH

Jonas Stutzman, from Somerset County, Pennsylvania, came to this site in 1809 to clear land for farming and to build a log home for his family. He was the first permanent settler in the eastern portion of what would in 1825 become Holmes County. Jonas and his wife Magdalena Gerber Stutzman were of the Amish faith–descendants from a group of strict Protestant Anabaptists with origins in Switzerland and Holland and dating from the 16th -century Protestant Reformation. Some of their beliefs, including separation of church and state, refusal to take oaths, pacifism, and believer’s baptism, were perceived as threats to the state church and government. Persecuted by both Catholics and Protestants, Anabaptists migrated and some came to the New World, many at the invitation of Pennsylvania’s William Penn. The Stutzmans and other early Amish pioneer setters-Millers, Hershbergers, Hochstetlers, Weavers, Troyers, Masts, and Schrocks-founded here what has become the largest Amish settlement in North America.

222 N. Main Street
Urbana

, OH

A group of Freemasons, inspired by the concepts of a new country, of Freedom with Responsibility, Brotherly Love, and Truth, formed Harmony Lodge near this site in 1809, the first Masonic lodge in western Ohio. Meetings were held in the log court house, located on Lot 174, East Court Street, and also in Dayton and Springfield.

120 S 3rd St
Steubenville

, OH

This log building was constructed in 1801 by David Hoge on the west side of Third Street. It served as his home and was the first Federal land office in that part of the Northwest Territory known as the Seven Ranges. In 1809 it was moved and 12 years later encased in a brick structure where it was discovered in 1940. It has been preserved by the citizens of Jefferson County.

541 Main Street
Milford

, OH

Founded in 1797 in the log cabin of the Reverend Francis McCormick, the Milford Methodist Church is the oldest of the denomination in the Northwest Territory and Ohio. Pioneer worshipers walked many miles through the wilderness to attend its circuit rider services. The present sanctuary was consecrated on Christmas Day, 1835. The bell tower and Sunday School rooms were 1870 additions.

Near 3119 Prairie Road
Wilmington

, OH

Near this site in October 1786 General Benjamin Logan with an army of 700 Kentucky volunteers camped on their way to destroy seven Indian towns in the Mad River Valley. During the night a renegade deserted the camp to warn the Indians. The army burned 200 cabins and 15,000 bushels of corn before returning. Later this site became an important survey point.

7461 Old US 24
Liberty Center

, OH

In 1742, a tribe of Kickapoo requested permission from Montreal’s Governor to move to a Mascoutin village on both sides of the river here. French “Coureurs de Bois” traders named the wide floodplain “La Prairie des Mascoutins” (The Meadow of the Mascoutin). In 1764, Captain Thomas Morris explored this newly acquired British territory, and met the prophetic dreamer Chief Katapelleecy here. General Anthony Wayne’s troops victoriously returned from The Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 and burned “Prairie de Masque.” The Treaty of Detroit in 1807 created a hunting reservation to the east, allowing settlers to acquire the surrounding lands. Ethnic tensions climaxed in 1812, when an American Captain Logan was mortally wounded near here. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 caused the remaining tribes to move west.