Remarkable Ohio

Results for: log-cabins
3000 Indian Creek Road
Oxford

, OH

The Indian Creek Regular Baptist Church was established in 1810 as an arm of the Little Cedar Creek Church of Brookville, Indiana. The congregation purchased three acres of land for a burial ground and church and built a log structure here in 1811. Members voted in 1812 that they would receive no person who believed in the principles of slavery. By 1829, membership had reached 150 and the present brick meeting house was built. In the 1840s, membership declined due to conflict over mission activity The congregation dissolved in 1879 and the land was deeded to the Indian Creek Cemetery Association in 1880. The county park system received the property in 1960 through and with the cooperation of the Butler County Historical Society and the Cemetery Association.

6 Federal Plaza E
Youngstown

, OH

John Young included a public square in his town plan of 1798. A one-room log schoolhouse opened in 1803. In the decades that followed, the Market and Federal Street intersection became the social center of Youngstown with wood-frame houses, churches, and an opera house surrounding the square. Horse-drawn streetcars, running from Brier Hill through the square, became the first form of public transportation in 1875. From 1869 to 1969 the nationally known Tod Hotel dominated the southeast corner of the square. Guests included seven U.S. presidents. Federal Street was paved in 1882, and electric street lights were installed in 1886. The “Diamond,” as the square was sometimes called, became the transportation hub of the city, especially after the Market Street Bridge opened in 1899. Marker for “Central Square (1900-2004)” across the street.

416 Clark Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The oldest building in Cincinnati’s basin area, the Betts House exemplifies a national trend on the expanding frontier of impermanent log and frame structures giving way to more permanent brick architecture. It is the earliest surviving brick building in the city. During Cincinnati’s period of settlement in the early 1800s, the William and Phebe Betts family established a brickyard here that supplied building materials for the rapidly growing frontier city. The Betts House lends its name to the Betts-Longworth Historic District. Established in 1983, the district represents the last nineteenth century remnant of Cincinnati’s lower West End and surrounds the older Betts House with tall, narrow mid-and late-nineteenth century buildings. The Betts house is oriented to the cardinal directions, rather than to the city’s slightly skewed grid.

Across from 441 S Main Street
Poland

, OH

In 1798, Judge Turhand Kirtland came to Township 1, Range 1 as an agent of the Connecticut Land Company. In 1804, Kirtland donated the Village Green and the graveyard adjoining the church to the residents of Poland. On the Green, the settlers built a log meetinghouse and school. Prior to 1812, the local militia drilled here and, in 1861, young men trained here before leaving to fight in the Civil War. The graveyard contains some 450 graves of early families of Poland, including settlers such as Kirtland, Fowler, Walker, Morse, Arrel, Adair, Lee, McCombs, and Truesdale. Among those buried here are thirteen Revolutionary War veterans, thirteen veterans of the War of 1812, and ten men who fought in the Civil War. In 1862, Samuel K. Hine provided in his will for the maintenance of both the Graveyard and the Green.

1631 North Hametown Rd
Akron

, OH

In 1829, Samuel and Charlotte Hale Shaw came to Bath Township from Bristol, New York. They purchased 145 acres of land where Samuel, a carpenter, built a two-story frame house. They had six children; two died in infancy. Their two year old daughter, Charlotte, was the first to be buried in Shaw Cemetery. They conveyed one half acre of land to the township for a “burying ground” in 1836. Samuel died in 1836; Charlotte then married Lyman Doolittle. They had five children; two daughters survived to adulthood. In 1892, Virgil E and Genevieve Doolittle Shaw sold one acre to Bath Township to expand Shaw Cemetery. Samuel’s parents, Constant and Mercy Pitts Shaw, migrated to Bath Township along with his brothers and their families.

10 E Elm Street
Monroe

, OH

Nathanial Sackett (1768-1854) and John H. Piatt (1781-1820) platted Monroe in 1817, naming it for President James Monroe. Monroe was a stagecoach stop between Cincinnati and Dayton and grew to be a rural village surrounded by farms and dotted with small factories, incorporating in 1907. Beginning in the mid-1950s and coinciding with the construction of Interstate 75, the village expanded geographically, through the annexation of surrounding farmland, and continued to grow in population. Monroe officially became a city in 1995, when its population exceeded 5,000 people (5,380). As of its bicentennial year of 2017, Monroe was home to more than 13,000.

3712 Leffington Road
Canfield

, OH

The Boy Scouts of America began in 1910, and by 1912, Scouting was established in the Mahoning Valley. Camp Stambaugh opened in July 1919, thanks to a gift from the estate of prominent local industrialist Henry H. Stambaugh (1858-1919). In his will he had named his friend and business partner Phillip J. Thompson as trustee of Stambaugh’s 86.5 acre Indian Creek Farm. Stambaugh’s expectation was that Thompson would convey the property to the local Scouting organization. In 1919 the property was mostly a treeless pasture and one could see Indian Creek from Stambaugh’s hay barn near Leffingwell Road. That first summer a Council Ring was carved from an old limestone quarry just north of the creek. (Continued on other side)

1241 Cleveland Massillon Road
Akron

, OH

Settlers from New England purchased this land in 1817 for use as a burying ground and to build a meeting house. Located in the center of Bath Township, a part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, the site provided a convenient place for public and religious gatherings and for a cemetery. Out of need, the cemetery was established before the township was founded in 1818. Many of Bath Township’s farming families, as well as both owners and operators of businesses of Bath, are interred in the cemetery. In a tradition originating with Civil War veteran Perry Alexander, the graves of all veterans are marked with an American flag on Memorial Day as a tribute to their service.