Remarkable Ohio

Results for: urban-historic-district
37700 Detroit Road
Avon

, OH

A progressive farmer, physician, and legislator, Norton S. Townshend lived in Avon from 1830 until his death. His introduction of field drainage tile significantly increased the productivity of Avon farmland. A well-educated country doctor, he served this district as a U.S. congressman (1851-1853) and later as an Ohio state senator. As a legislator Townshend, a member of the antislavery “Free Soil” Party, espoused civil rights for women and free blacks. Later he was instrumental in the founding of the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College in Columbus, serving on the first board and as its first professor of agriculture. In 1878, this land-grant college became Ohio State University, where Townshend Hall stands in honor of his founding role. He is interred in Avon’s mound cemetery.

SR 324
Rio Grande

, OH

This historic marker is on the western boundary of the original 10 acre Rio Grande College Campus, founded and endowed by Nehemiah and Permelia Atwood. The campus was located on the southeast corner of the Atwood Farm. Construction of Atwood Hall and the Boarding Hall began in 1875. The College was organized on November 1, 1875, dedicated on August 29, 1876, and opened for classes on September 13, 1876. Rio Grande College was incorporated as a non-profit educational institution by the State of Ohio on May 30, 1883.

100 N. Main Street
Marion

, OH

This is Marion County’s fourth courthouse and the second at this site. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1884. Costing $115, 00, it was completed in 1885 by contractors Leffler and Bland. In 1973 the courthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1975 the interior was remodeled at a cost of over $900,000.

90 W. Sixth Street, Lucy Hayes Heritage Center
Chillicothe

, OH

First Lady Lucy Ware Webb Hayes was born in this four-room Federal Vernacular house in 1831. Well educated for her time, she attended local schools, took classes in the preparatory department of Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, and graduated from Wesleyan Female College in Cincinnati in 1850. She married lawyer and future U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1852. They raised five children to adulthood. As a colonel’s wife during the Civil War, “Mother Lucy” boosted morale for the soldiers of the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiment. In 1870, during Hayes’ first term as governor of Ohio, Lucy helped establish the Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home as a state institution. (continued on other side)

Between 1717 and 1739 N Fountain Blvd
Springfield

, OH

The Ridgewood neighborhood, platted in 1914, was one of the first fully planned and restricted suburbs in the United States. Its innovative developer, Springfield native Harry S. Kissell, was among a small group of nationally-acclaimed real estate developers who, in the early twentieth century, created the modern suburb as we know it today. Their developments offered spacious lots in park-like settings; curvilinear, paved roads; utilities, and sewers. They also ushered in the practice of deed restrictions, which were both protective and exclusionary. Harry Kissell went on to become president of the National Association of Real Estate Boards in 1931. During his tenure, he conceived the idea for the Federal Home Loan Banking system, which, during the Great Depression, saved millioins of Americans from foreclosure and permanently opened up the possibility of home ownership to the middle class.

SW corner of Fry Road and Sheldon Road
Middleburg Heights

, OH

This Little Red Schoolhouse served children from Berea, Brookpark, and Middleburg township. The first mayor and council of Middleburgh Heights were elected here. During its colorful history, the schoolhouse has been a City Hall where town meetings were held, a speak-easy, a railroad way station, and a private residence.

Steubenville Marina, along the Ohio River N of the US 22 bridge
Steubenville

, OH

Lock and Dam 10, completed in 1915, was part of a slack-water navigation system built for the Ohio River. The site included a brick powerhouse and two lockkeeper houses. The lock and dam was replaced when Pike Island Dam was completed in 1965. The buildings were demolished in 1975. Remnants include two sets of steps, a 600-foot ramp, the lock esplanade and wall, and a recess at the east end where the lock gate once retracted. The first part of this system was the Davis Island Dam near Pittsburgh, completed in 1885. By 1929, a nine-foot pool had been completed along the entire length of the Ohio, culminating with Lock and Dam 53 at Grand Chain, Illinois. Built by the Pittsburgh District of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, this system resulted in a more navigable Ohio River with increased depth and diminished current.

101 East Main Street
Bellevue

, OH

Built in 1846, the Tremont House was opened by Loel and Samuel B. Chandler to serve stagecoach traffic on the Maumee Pike (U.S. Route 20). Briefly a hotel, this Bellevue landmark has housed grocery and hardware stores, a pharmacy, and even a cigar factory. The third floor ballroom hosted community events and fraternal organizations such as the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF). The building’s west side is on the western boundary of the Firelands region of the Connecticut Western Reserve. An example of Greek Revival architecture, the Tremont House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006.