Remarkable Ohio

Results for: hamilton
901 Findlay Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Camp Joy was born at the site of Seven Hills Neighborhood House and original location of St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission Church. Displacement and loss caused by Ohio River flood of 1937 inspired St. Barnabas’ rector and his wife, Laurence “Cap” and Sadie Hall, to act on behalf of the children of Cincinnati’s West End. The Halls conceived of Camp Joy as a haven where kids could find a respite from impoverished surroundings in the city and its sweltering summer heat. The camp was a success and continued after the Halls’ assignment to another parish. From 1940-1944, Rev J. Brooke and Mrs. Betty Mosley continued to nurture the people of the West End through St. Barnabas and Camp Joy. (Continued on other side)

Just E of 1595 Covered Bridge Road
Cincinnati

, OH

Mechanical reapers enabled farmers to harvest much more grain than they could by sickle or scythe. In June 1835, in a field 800 feet southeast of Mill Creek, inventor Obed Hussey (1791-1860) tested what he upheld as the first successful reaper. Blacksmith John Lane, miller Jediah Hill, Hill’s son-in-law Henry Rogers, brothers Algernon and Thomas Foster, and others observed the test, the culmination of Hussey’s experiments with prototypes since the early 1830s. Hussey’s patent for a reaper in 1833 predated that of his competitor Cyrus McCormick (1809-1884) applied for in 1834. Initially, some preferred Hussey’s reaper to McCormick’s, although McCormick’s machines eventually dominated the field. In the late 1850s, Hussey and others sued McCormick for patent infringement and won, compelling the payment of damages by McCormick.

SE of the intersection of Dumont Street and Carrel Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The cemetery dates to 1794 and is comprised of two adjacent cemeteries: Columbia Presbyterian Cemetery and Fulton Cemetery. Another cemetery, the Fulton Mechanics Cemetery, had been in Fulton, a village along the Ohio River and a center of boat-building and steamboat construction during the first half of 19th century. Together, the cemeteries are the burial places of Jacob Allen, John Campbell, John Langdon, and other veterans of the Revolutionary War. It is also believed that William Brown is buried here. Brown was one of three soldiers during the Revolutionary War to receive the Badge of Military Merit, predecessor of the Purple Heart. The cemetery was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. (Continued on other side)

6840 Clough Pike
Cincinnati

, OH

The Clark Stone House, constructed around 1801 by James Clark (1765-1852), is one of the oldest standing stone houses in Ohio. Clark, who served as a drummer in the Battle of Yorktown (1781), came with his family to Anderson Township in 1797 and bought this land along Clough Creek. Clark was a mathematician, taught school, ran a distillery, operated an orchard nursery and served as a justice of the peace, a judge, and a state legislator. The two-story dressed limestone house was sold to the Leuser family in 1864, was acquired by the related Messmer family in 1923, and sold to Anderson Township in 1995.

CARE/Crawley Building, 3230 Eden Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

Daniel Drake, M.D.. Daniel Drake (1785-1852) was an influential figure in 19th century American medicine, gaining fame as physician, scientist, author, educator, and ardent champion for the City of Cincinnati. In 1819, Drake was the founding president of the Medical College of Ohio, which eventually became the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine, and a founder of Cincinnati College. Among Drake’s contributions, he argued for raising standards of medical education by having students study at patient bedsides and work in hospitals. A history of medicine from 1921 hailed Drake’s Practical Essays on Medical Education in the United States (1832) as one of “the most important contributions ever made to the subject in this country.”

280 E. Whittier Street
Columbus

, OH

In the fall, life for many in Columbus revolves around Ohio State University football, from the first kickoff in September to the last play in November. O.S.U.’s first home game took place at 2:30 P.M. on November 1, 1890. The Ohio State University played the University of Wooster on this site, which was then called Recreation Park. Just east of historic German Village, the park occupied the north side of Schiller (now Whittier) between Ebner and Jaeger in what is now Schumacher Place. The weather was perfect, and the crowd reportedly included a number of women, who cheered loudly. Nonetheless, O.S.U. lost to Wooster 64-0. Wooster, physically fit for the game, showed O.S.U. that training is critical to winning. The tradition of training continues. Today, on football Saturdays in Ohio Stadium on Woody Hayes Drive, the sound of an O.S.U. home game can be heard around the world.

Cheviot Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road
Cheviot

, OH

In 1804, Enoch (1764-1817) and Achsah (c.1767-1839) Carson and their seven children journeyd from New Jersey to Cincinnati. In 1805, they settled in the western hills in a large grove near Beech Flats, in what would become Green Township in 1809 and Cheviot in 1818. Game was plentiful and fertile soil yielded abundant crops. By 1806, Carson had cleared and cultivated nearly 20 acres of his land. That fall, he began a tradition that has continued into the 21st century. Echoing the ancient custom of harvest home, Carson brought together a fledging community to celebrate its good fortune and abundant harvests. Each passing year the community gathered in Carson’s grove to give thanks, rejoice, and uphold the tradition of harvest home. (Continued on other side)

3908 Winding Way
Cincinnati

, OH

Xavier University Armory. The Xavier University Armory was dedicated in 1948 by the first Secretary of the Army, Kenneth C. Royall. In the following decades, U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) cadets used it as a place to refine their tactical and technical skillsets in preparation to serve as officers in the U.S. Army. Since 1948, Xavier University ROTC commissionees have become General Officers and recipients of the Silver Star Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, and other prestigious awards. (Continued on other side)