Remarkable Ohio

Results for: hamilton
929 E. McMillan Street
Cincinnati

, OH

When the cable car route was electrified in 1898, transportation through the area became more efficient, and Walnut Hills became more desirable. New stores were built to accommodate commuters who found it convenient to shop while waiting to transfer at Peebles Corner. During the early 1900s, high-density, mixed-use buildings were erected to accommodate the increasing population and facilitate commercial and residential growth. These buildings had three or four stories with a storefront on the first floor and multi-family residences above. They reflected architectural styles representative of the period including Italianate, Queen Anne, Classical Revival, and Art Deco. The Peebles Corner Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1985 for its commercial and architectural significance.

318 East Fourth Street
Cincinnati

, OH

In 1817 twenty-two men, including future President William Henry Harrison, chartered Cincinnati’s first Episcopal parish, Christ Church. In 1835 members erected a Gothic Revival-style church on this site. The neighborhood evolved as the city grew with the influx of immigrants. Parish women raised funds to teach, feed, clothe, and shelter tenement families, and alleviate suffering during floods and disease outbreaks. In 1883 the women helped establish what became Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. In 1909 members opened the Late Gothic-style Parish House, a community center with kitchen, classrooms, library, auditorium, clinic, gymnasium, and bowling alley. By the parish’s centennial in 1917, music had expanded beyond worship to public concerts. In 1940 the annual Boar’s Head Festival of music and pageantry began. Since the 1960s, members have collaborated with local agencies to advocate for social and economic justice, a mission continuing into the 21st century. (Continued on other side)

1801 Race Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Findlay Market is the heart of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood and has been a gathering place for political, religious, and social events since opening in 1855. Inspired by the Cincinnati Reds World Championship in 1919, a group of fans –“rooters” – from Findlay Market organized a parade to celebrate the start of the team’s 1920 season. The parade became an annual event, with marching bands, horse-drawn “Tally-Ho” wagons and rooters processioning to Redland and later Crosley Field, where they presented gifts to Reds officials. (Continued on other side)

100 Joe Nuxhall Way
Cincinnati

, OH

Findlay Market is the heart of the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood and has been a gathering place for political, religious, and social events since opening in 1855. Inspired by the Cincinnati Reds World Championship in 1919, a group of fans – “Rooters” – from Findlay Market organized a parade to celebrate the state of the team’s 1920 season. The parade became an annual event, with marching bands, horse-drawn “Tally-Ho” wagons and rooters processioning to Redland and later Crosley Field, where they presented gifts to Reds officials. (Continued on other side)

49 East 4th Street
Cincinnati

, OH

The Cincinnati Stock Exchange (CSE), founded in 1885, was headquartered in the Dixie Terminal Building at 49 East 4th Street. The CSE emerged as an innovator in stock trading when it started the nation’s first computerized stock exchange in 1976, allowing brokers to execute customer orders directly through their CSE National Securities Trading System data terminals. Computerization revolutionized stock exchanges domestically and then globally, as computers accepted, matched, and executed orders for stocks automatically, eliminating manual processing. The New York Stock Exchange acquired the CSE in 2017.

400 Chestnut Street
Cincinnati

, OH

Chestnut Street Cemetery is the first Jewish cemetery in Ohio and the earliest west of the Allegheny Mountains. It was established in 1821 when Nicholas Longworth sold land to Joseph Jonas, David I. Johnson, Morris Moses, Moses Nathan, Abraham Jonas, and Solomon Moses for $75 as a “burying ground.” Benjamin Lape (or Leib) was the first buried there with Jewish rites. The purchase of the original plot marks the beginning of an organized Jewish community in the Queen City. Chestnut Street Cemetery, although enlarged by adjacent purchases, closed in 1849 when cholera ravaged the city and filled available space. In all, there are approximately 100 interments on the site. Jewish Cemeteries of Greater Cincinnati maintains Chestnut Street Cemetery as well as many other Jewish cemeteries in the region.

1010 Chapel Street
Cincinnati

, OH

“Lifting As We Climb”: The Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs (CFCWC) was organized May 6, 1904, during a meeting called by Mary Fletcher Ross at the Allen Temple A.M.E. Church. Gathering together eight existing African-American women’s clubs, the CFCWC sought to unite in their work promoting “the betterment of the community.” At a time when both government and private philanthropies overlooked the needs of Black Americans, CFCWC members helped to organize the city’s first kindergartens for Black children, taught in Cincinnati African-American public schools –including the Walnut Hills Douglass and Stowe schools—and raised money for the Home of Aged Colored Women. Since 1904, the Cincinnati Federation of Colored Women’s Clubs has ensured the civic and constitutional rights of all African Americans while meeting the needs of their city.

2100 Duck Creek Road
Cincinnati

, OH

James W. Rankin served four consecutive terms (1971-1978) in the Ohio House of Representatives. Born and raised in Cincinnati, he graduated from Withrow High School and The Ohio State University’s School of Social Work. While working in Cincinnati’s Seven Hills neighborhood, he ran for office to “involve the disadvantaged in the governmental processes that affected their lives.” He won his first bid and served the next seven years as a state representative for the 69th House district, later the reapportioned 25th district. Representative Rankin fought passionately for civil and human rights in education and public policy. He served on the Reference, Human Resources, and Finance committees. When Rankin died of pneumonia, aged 52, the Cincinnati Enquirer proclaimed him a “Friend of the Poor.”