Remarkable Ohio

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11385 Amsterdam Rd
Anna

, OH

Dinsmore Township School District #4 was formed in 1865following a decision by the township’s board of education that a school would be built in the center of every four sections of land, or every four square miles. This placement of school buildings gave township children the opportunity to attend school close to home and the chance at receiving a public education up to the eighth grade, Nine districts were created for the children of white households, and an additional district was formed to educate the children of the African American families, for a total of ten districts in the township. On June 11, 1866, the Dinsmore Township School Board purchased land from George Wenger to build the District #4 school near the intersection of Ohio Route 274 and Wenger Road. (Continued on other side)

Hubbard House Underground Railroad Museum, 1603 Walnut Blvd
Ashtabula

, OH

Built in the 1840s by William and Catharine Hubbard and known as “Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard” or “The Great Emporium” by fugitive slaves, the Hubbard House was an important terminus on the fabled Underground Railroad in the years before the Civil War. The Hubbard House sheltered escaped slaves who had risked life and limb after crossing the Ohio River into the North. From the Hubbard home, slaves walked one-quarter mile to the Hubbard and Company warehouse on the Ashtabula River, where friendly boat captains awaited to ferry their passengers to Canada and freedom. The U.S. Department of the Interior listed the Hubbard House on its National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

1031 River Road
Maumee

, OH

This federal style house was built in 1827 by James A. Wolcott who migrated to Ohio in 1818 from Connecticut. Of distinguished parentage, Wolcott was a leading merchant, shipbuilder, judge and politician. Here he and his wife, Mary Wells, daughter of scout William Wells and Sweet Breeze, Indian Chief Little Turtle’s daughter, made their home a center of frontier activity. This house stands as a tangible symbol of this Maumee pioneer, a Registered National Historic Place.

407 N Market St
Wooster

, OH

Harvey Howard, a local druggist, built the house at 407 North Market Street around 1860. After many owners, Captain James B. Taylor bought the home in 1893. Taylor commanded Company H of the 120th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. He studied law after the war and moved his practice to Wooster in 1882. Taylor’s wife Emelie died in 1905 and in 1906 Taylor sold the property to become Wooster’s first city hospital. Many of the town’s noted physicians practiced here and the facility was eventually enlarged to accommodate 30 beds. The house was a hospital until 1943, when Central Christian Church purchased it. The church used the building for education programs and restored much of its decor, including four fireplaces, inlaid floors, and bronze door hardware.

New Boston

, OH

A native of New Boston, Vernal G. Riffe Jr. served the 92nd House District in the Ohio General Assembly from 1959 to 1994. As Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1974 through 1994, he served longer than any other speaker in the state’s history. Widely regarded as Ohio’s most influential legislator of the late 20th century, Riffe, a Democrat, built effective political alliances across party lines. A powerful advocate for southern Ohio, he was instrumental in the growth and expansion of Shawnee State University.

661 Mahoning Avenue
Warren

, OH

Administration Building built in 1931. Chapter House built in 1962. Commemorating American Red Cross Centennial, 1881-1981. / Pioneer Cemetery – Early Western Reserve burial grounds, 1804-1848. Grave sites of 12 Revolutionary War veterans and Mary Chesney, member of pioneer Warren family and for whom local D.A.R. chapter was named.

190 W. Winter Street
Delaware

, OH

George W. Campbell originally built this highly picturesque structure in 1854. Designed with Romanesque and Norman Revival architectural features – a round tower, arched windows and doorways – and constructed of locally mined blue limestone, the home is representative of the work of architect W. Russell West. Campbell, a nationally eminent horticulturist, had a small vineyard to the east of the house where he developed and improved a variety of fruits, most notably the world famous Delaware Grape. Following Campbell’s death in 1898, the house was sold to Dr. Aaron J. Lyons and Mrs. Abbie Parish and presented to Ohio Wesleyan University, serving for more than 70 years as Lyons Art Hall.

SE corner of OH 58 and OH 162
Huntington

, OH

Myron T. Herrick, Governor of Ohio from 1904 to 1906, was born in Huntington Township in 1854 and lived here until age 12. A respected Cleveland attorney and businessman, Herrick was a friend and confidant to Senator Mark Hanna and Presidents McKinley, Taft, and Harding. His public service career culminated in two appointments as ambassador to France, from 1912 through the outbreak of World War I in 1914, and again from 1921 until his death in 1929. Enormously popular with the French people, Herrick escorted Charles Lindbergh in Paris after his historic 1927 transatlantic flight.