Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=a17b03f100564038830e2329f9079f4e&swpmtxnonce=58e942765e/22/&public-schools
Court and Pinckney Streets
Circleville

, OH

Born in North Adams, Massachusetts on December 23, 1778, Caleb Atwater graduated from Williams College in 1804. He moved to Circleville in about 1814 where he organized the city’s first school board and served as postmaster and prosecuting attorney. His life and work as a teacher, minister, lawyer, legislator, and scholar greatly influenced early 19th-century Ohio. Upon arriving in Circleville, he became interested in local history and the nearby earthworks and in 1820 published his book Descriptions of the Antiquities Discovered in the State of Ohio and Other Western States, the first compilation of prehistoric remains in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys. Elected to the Ohio State Legislature in 1821, Atwater fervently supported canal construction. He also chaired Ohio’s first board of school commissioners and was instrumental in passage of Ohio’s Public School Law. For this, he has been called the “Father of Ohio’s Common Schools.” (continued on other side)

1634 OH 232
New Richmond

, OH

Henry Clark Corbin was born September 15, 1842 and reared here on the family farm along Colclazer Run near Laurel. He attended public school and the private Parker Academy in nearby Clermontville. After teaching school and studying law, he enlisted in the Union Army in 1862 and military service became his career. Corbin served as the armed forces adjutant-general under President William McKinley during the Spanish-American War in 1898 and promoted to Lieutenant General on April 15, 1906. He died on September 8, 1909 in Washington, D.C. and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

268 N. South Street
Wilmington

, OH

The Wilmington Public Library of Clinton County, one of 111 Carnegie libraries in Ohio, opened its doors to readers on June 30, 1904. A $12,500 gift from steel magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie financed construction of the original 3,360-square-foot building. The community provided the building site, formerly known as Martin Field, and pledged tax funds for the library’s ongoing operation and maintenance. Expansions and modernizations have incorporated the original building and preserved its historic architectural style. “A Library outranks any other thing a community can do to benefit its people.” – Andrew Carnegie

SW Corner of Sunbury Square near S. Columbus St & E. Granville St.
Sunbury

, OH

When Sunbury was platted in 1816, a town square was set aside for public use with the intention of constructing a town hall on the site. The first two stories of the Town Hall were built, as a school, in 1868 for $5,000. The Masons added the third story for $1,500 and occupied it for 91 years, until a lodge was constructed. Since 1868, the Town Hall has served Sunbury as a village office building, jail, fire station, and community library. Church services as well as Farmer’s Institutes were held in the building, and at one time it housed a bank. In 2002, the Town Hall was renovated for use as a community room and village offices.

140-146 S. Paint Street
Chillicothe

, OH

Born in Chillicothe in 1872, Burton Stevenson’s life was devoted to the written word as a prolific author and anthologist, and as a librarian. Following stints as a journalist while a student at Princeton University and then at newspapers in Chillicothe, Stevenson became the librarian of the city’s public library in 1899. He held the post for 58 years. Stevenson helped secure a Carnegie Library for Chillicothe, completed in 1906, and became prominent for his service during World War I. He founded a library at Camp Sherman (an army training camp north of the city), which became a model for others nationally.

225 E. High Street
Springfield

, OH

Daniel Arthur Rudd was born into slavery on August 7, 1854, in Bardstown, Kentucky. He became a newspaperman, lecturer, publicist, and tireless advocate for the Roman Catholic Church. After the Civil War Rudd moved to Springfield. Baptized and raised in Catholicism, he joined St. Raphael Parish, where the philosophy of racial equality offered by the church solidified his vision of justice. By 1885 he had established his own weekly newspaper, The Ohio State Tribune. He rebranded it The American Catholic Tribune (ACT) after moving to Cincinnati. Rudd claimed ACT was the only Catholic newspaper owned by an African American. At the height of its popularity in 1892, the publication had a circulation of 10,000. In 1893 Rudd was asked to chair the Afro-American Press Association, representing more than 200 black-owned newspapers.

26850 SR-621
Fresno

, OH

Agricultural development and cultivation on steep lands led to severe soil erosion in the nation in the 1920s and 1930s. In response, the United States Department of Agriculture established the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) in 1935. The SCS established the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) in the hills of Coshocton County to study and develop methods of conserving soil and water resources. The Federal government and Coshocton County purchased 1,047 acres of land for the program and, in 1936, field research equipment was installed and buildings constructed. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) provided labor near the program’s inception, as did the Civilian Public Service Agency during World War II. (Continued on other side)

98 South Diamond St.
Mansfield

, OH

John “Appleseed” Chapman is considered one of Richland County’s original pioneers. In the summer of 1809, Chapman arrived in the Mansfield area just as Mansfield’s first town lots were being offered for sale. Chapman purchased town lot 265 for $120 from Henry H. Wilcoxen. Wilcoxen served as Richland County Sheriff from 1820 to 1825. Chapman later sold the lot to Jesse Edgington on October 30, 1818 for $100. During the War of 1812, approximately two blocks west of this site, members of the Delaware Indian tribe were encamped in a ravine southwest of the public square. After being removed by military force and their village burned, the Delaware were en route from their village in Greentown to the Council at Piqua under Colonel Samuel Kratzer.