Results for: music
7983 S Wiswell Road
Windsor

, OH

The prehistoric Erie Indians built a fortification across this neck of land sometime before 1650. A low wall is all that remains today of a stockade where earth had been piled at the base of posts. The stockade and the naturally steep embankments of the ridge provided a safe location for an Indian village.

Painesville

, OH

Prehistoric Erie Indians built a fortification across this neck of land sometime before 1650. A low wall is all that remains today of a stockade where earth had been piled at the base of posts. The stockade and the naturally steep embankments of the ridge provided a safe location for an Indian village.

120 S. 3rd Street
Steubenville

, OH

One of the most famous entertainers of the 20th century, Dean Martin was born Dino Crocetti in Steubenville in 1917, the son of Italian immigrants. At age 16 he entered the steel mills and later boxed under the name of “Kid Crochet.” He began his singing career in 1941, and in 1946 teamed up with Jerry Lewis in a comedic partnership that spanned ten years on stage, radio, and television. His trademark crooning style and sentimental ballads-including “That’s Amore,” “Memories Are Made Of This,” “Volare,” and “Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime”-were standards of 1950s and 1960s popular music. Martin continued his multifaceted career as part of Frank Sinatra’s “Ratpack” Las Vegas nightclub act (1960-1963) and on television with “The Dean Martin Show” (1964-1970). He furnished music and romantic interest for over fifty films, and continued performing into the early 1990s. He died in 1995 in Los Angeles.

2605 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

The 43-room Tudor mansion represents a fine example of stately homes in Cleveland at the turn of the century and is the last of the “Millionaire Row” homes that once lined Euclid Avenue. It was designed by Charles F. Schweinfurth, a world-renowned Cleveland architect, in 1905-06 and completed in 1910 at a cost of $1,200,000. Following Samuel Mather’s death in 1931, the building was occupied by the Cleveland Institute of Music until 1940 then by the Cleveland Automobile Club until 1967 when it was purchased by The Cleveland State University. The mansion was entered into the National Register of Historic Places on February 20, 1973.

‘Ted Lewis Park, North Court Street
Circleville

, OH

One of the outstanding American showmen of the twentieth century, Ted Lewis was born Theodore Leopold Friedman in Circleville to a prominent business family. Stagestruck at an early age, Lewis began performing in cabarets, vaudeville shows, and nightclubs throughout Ohio at age 17, and moved to New York in 1915. Ted opened his own cabaret in 1918. With his animated stage persona, his clarinet, and his trademark cane and battered top hat, Lewis enjoyed a wide appeal with his jazz age audiences. His “Me and My Shadow” act exemplified his popularity during the 1920s, at which time he was the highest-paid entertainer in the business. His career spanned over six decades, from vaudeville to television. Lewis died in New York in 1971.

321 Mahoing Avenue
Warren

, OH

1832 Greek Revival Style. The Kinsman House once served as classrooms for the Dana School of Music, Hiram College Branch. The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

25 Public Squre in Willoughby
Willoughby

, OH

The village of Chagrin, founded in 1798, changed its name in 1834 to honor Dr. Westel Willoughby, a pioneer medical educator. That same year, the Willoughby University of Lake Erie was chartered, and the Willoughby Medical College opened its doors, signaling the beginning of medical education in northern Ohio. The Medical College trained 160 doctors, educated in contemporary methods of medicine, anatomy, chemistry, and surgery. Financial struggles and public outcry against grave-robbing — which supplied cadavers for anatomy classes — hampered the college’s development. The movement of faculty to Cleveland and the transfer of the state charter to Columbus hastened the demise of the Medical College in 1847, and laid the foundation for the establishment of the medical schools of Case Western and Ohio State universities. (Continued on side two)

Court and Pinckney Streets
Circleville

, OH

Born in North Adams, Massachusetts on December 23, 1778, Caleb Atwater graduated from Williams College in 1804. He moved to Circleville in about 1814 where he organized the city’s first school board and served as postmaster and prosecuting attorney. His life and work as a teacher, minister, lawyer, legislator, and scholar greatly influenced early 19th-century Ohio. Upon arriving in Circleville, he became interested in local history and the nearby earthworks and in 1820 published his book Descriptions of the Antiquities Discovered in the State of Ohio and Other Western States, the first compilation of prehistoric remains in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys. Elected to the Ohio State Legislature in 1821, Atwater fervently supported canal construction. He also chaired Ohio’s first board of school commissioners and was instrumental in passage of Ohio’s Public School Law. For this, he has been called the “Father of Ohio’s Common Schools.” (continued on other side)