Results for: disaster
Bucyrus

, OH

Col. William Crawford’s army of 480 Pennsylvania volunteers passed near this site on June 3 to attack the Indians near Upper Sandusky. On June 4-5 they encountered a combined force of Shawnees, Delawares, Wyandots, and, unexpectedly, Butler’s Rangers, a British unit from Detroit. The expedition was a disaster; about 300 Americans escaped. On June 6, about six miles west of this marker, the opposing forces met again at the “Battle of Olentangy.” With minor losses, the Americans continued their retreat, reaching the Ohio River on June 13. Crawford was captured, and burned at the stake on June 11.

Beverly

, OH

On November 12, 1852, the riverboat “Buckeye Belle” exploded at this site. Twenty-four people died and a dozen were injured in the worst steamboat disaster on the Muskingum River. An eyewitness described the scene: “The bank of the canal was covered with dead and mutilated bodies and fragments of the boat and cargo.” Boiler explosions were a hazard of steamboat travel. The safety record on the Muskingum River was good. There are only two other recorded riverboat explosions on the Muskingum River. The “Newark” blew-up in 1847 at Rokeby, killing four, and the “L.C. McCormick” exploded in 1879 south of Beverly, killing one.

Lowell

, OH

Lowell was the site of one of ten wooden covered bridges, built from 1820 to 1887, that crossed the Muskingum River from Marietta to Coshocton. The Lowell bridge was built in 1881. Bridges were built out of wood because there was plenty of lumber available, and building with wood was easier and cheaper than using stone. Covers protected the timbers from rain. The bridge connected Lowell, on the north side of the river, with the railroad that ran on the south side. This bridge suffered from many mishaps typical of wooden bridges. In 1882 a severe storm blew off the roof. In 1884 a flood washed the bridge off its stone piers. The bridge was restored, only to be destroyed by the 1913 flood, a disaster that removed many bridges on the river. An iron bridge was built on the site. The last covered bridge on the river was at Conesville seven miles south of Coshocton. Built in 1876, the bridge was condemned in 1958 and destroyed by a controlled fire.

147 Allen Avenue
Powhatan Point

, OH

The Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seam, located 100 feet below river level at Powhatan Point, extends across much of eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northern West Virginia. The Cleveland and Western Coal Company, founded by Cleveland industrialist Frank E. Taplin, opened the Powhatan No. 1 mine here in 1922 to take advantage of both river and rail transportation. It became the largest deep mine in Ohio and was the first mine in the state to be completely mechanized. Reorganized as the North American Coal Corporation in 1925, the company operated seven shaft mines in this area during the twentieth century. Four of these mines closed between 1980 and 1984 as clean air standards made locally mined high-sulfur coal difficult to market.

2135 OH-7
Kanauga

, OH

On December 15, 1967, about one mile downstream from this historic marker, a national tragedy occurred. Forty-six interstate travelers lost their lives when the Silver Bridge collapsed into the Ohio River during five o’clock rush hour traffic. The 2,235 foot two-way vehicular bridge connected Point Pleasant, West Virginia and Kanauga, Ohio via U.S. Route 35. The West Virginia Ohio River Company built the structure in 1928 for $1.2 million. The bridge, unique in its engineering conception, was the first of its design in America and the second in the world. Instead of woven-wire cable, the bridge was suspended on heat-treated eye-bar chains. It was named the “Silver Bridge” because it was the first in the world to be painted with aluminum paint. In 1969, two years later, its replacement, the Silver Memorial Bridge was dedicated.

30435 Lakeshore Boulevard
Willowick

, OH

Following the completion of the Erie Canal from Albany to Buffalo, New York, Lake Erie became an important link in an all-water route for immigrants traveling from the eastern seaboard into the Midwest. The 600-ton lake steamer G.P. Griffith, launched in 1847, was one of dozens built to capitalize on this booming trade. On June 17, 1850, the Griffith, outbound with more than 300 passengers on a three-day voyage from Buffalo to Toledo, caught fire and burned about 220 yards from this overlook. Many of the German, English, Irish, and Scandinavian settlers were laden with money sewn into their clothing, and few reached shore. Contemporary accounts listed 286 lost. Most were buried in a mass grave on the beach, since reclaimed by Lake Erie. The Griffith incident remains one of the worst maritime disasters on the Great Lakes.

NE corner of Lake Avenue & 27th Street
Ashtabula

, OH

Near this site, an iron truss bridge collapsed into the Ashtabula River during a blizzard, plunging a passenger train with 160 on board into the gulf below. Nearly 100 people were killed in this, one of the worst train disasters in American history. The most well known passengers were Philip Paul Bliss (1838-1876) and his wife, Lucy. A leading gospel songwriter, Bliss wrote more than 100 hymns including the music to “It Is Well With My Soul.” The unidentified were buried in a mass grave at Chestnut Grove Cemetery that is marked by a tall granite monument listing the names of those who died. The local hospital was founded as a result of this disaster and features an audio history in the James Lewis Smith Memorial Courtyard in front. The incident also led to reforms in bridge design and railroad safety.

J. W. Denver Williams Memorial Park, 1100 Rombach Avenue
Wilmington

, OH

On April 18, 1964, reservists from the 302nd Troop Carrier Wing at the Clinton County Air Force Base (CCAFB) and 2nd Special Forces Group (Green Berets) of Fort Hayes, Columbus were to undergo an Operational Readiness Inspection. In a flight of nine C-119 “Flying Boxcars,” the men were to execute a routine night formation paratroop drop. Airborne, the flight encountered worsening weather conditions and the lead plane called off the mission. Returning to CCAFB, two C-119s collided in mid-air and crashed about five miles northeast of the base, near the intersection of Stone and Melvin roads. Tragically, 17 of the 19 men aboard were killed.(Continued on other side)