Results for: warren
Ridgeville

, OH

Having settled in the Ridgeville area with his father, Justice McLean, in 1799, Justice John McLean was appointed to the United States Supreme Court in 1829 by President Andrew Jackson. He was best known for his anti-slavery dissenting opinion in the famous Dred Scott case. Founder of the Western Star, former Postmaster General, Congressman, and candidate for President, Justice McLean served on the Supreme Court until his death in 1861.

585 N. State Route 741
Lebanon

, OH

Union Village, the first and largest Shaker (United Society of Believers) community west of the Allegheny Mountains, was established in 1805. Nearly 4,000 Shakers lived in Union Village, the last living here until 1920. They owned 4,500 acres of land with more than 100 buildings. Union Village was parent to other communities in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Georgia. Shakers were among the most successful religious communal societies in the United States. Believe in equality of men and women, separation of sexes, confession, communal ownership of property, and celibacy helped define their society. The name “Shaker” was derived from the shaking and dancing that were part of their worship. Union Village Shakers were successful entrepreneurs selling herbal medicines, garden seeds, and brooms. They also raised and bred Poland China hogs, Durham cattle, and Merino sheep.

210 W. Main Street
Lebanon

, OH

One of the most effective political orators of his era, Tom Corwin (nicknamed “the Wagon Boy” for his War of 1812 service) resided here from 1839 until his death. A Whig stump speaker known for his wit and eloquence, he was elected governor of Ohio in 1840 and campaigned for William Henry Harrison in his presidential victory that year. Corwin served six terms in Congress and one in the Senate, where he spoke out against the Mexican War in 1847. He also served as secretary of the treasury in the Fillmore administration and as President Lincoln’s minister to Mexico. Built and first occupied by Corwin’s brother-in-law Phineas Ross in 1818, the Corwin House is representative of Federal-style architecture of this period.

129 N. Main Street
Waynesville

, OH

David and Rachel Burnet Evans built this Federal style house in 1836. Their son, Dr. John Evans (1814-1897), nationally known physician, statesman, and educator, lived here as a young man. After graduating from Lynn Medical College in Cincinnati, Dr. Evans became a prominent physician in Indiana and helped establish the Indiana Hospital for the Insane. He is recognized as one of the founders and first president of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the first governor of the Colorado Territory and is credited for developing the railroad system in Colorado. His desire to institute a system of higher education in the territory led to the founding of Colorado Seminary, later known as Denver University. Evanston, Illinois and Mt. Evans near Denver were named in his honor.

719 Tylersville Road
Mason

, OH

In 1922, during the infancy of broadcast radio, the call letters WLW were assigned to the station begun by Cincinnatian Powell Crosley Jr. The station moved its transmitting operations to Mason in 1928, and by April 17, 1934, WLW had permission to operate experimentally at 500,000 watts. Becoming the first and only commercial radio station to broadcast at this “superpower,” WLW was formally opened at 500,000 watts by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on May 2, 1934. Using its 831-foot Blaw-Knox antenna to broadcast at ten times the power of any station, it earned the title “The Nation’s Station.” Locals reported hearing broadcasts on barbed wire fences, milking machines, rainspouts, water faucets, and radiators. The custom built transmitter, a joint venture between RCA, GE, and Westinghouse, remained in operation until March 1, 1939 when the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ordered the station to return to broadcasting at 50,000 watts.

1863 Roxanna-New Burlington Road
Waynesville

, OH

Nearly 90% of Ohio’s wetlands have been drained or filled. Kettle holes, sphagnum peat bogs, prairies, and oak openings are still found in a few glaciated areas in the northern half of the state. Coastal areas along Lake Erie and bottomlands along Ohio’s rivers and streams preserve the remaining wetlands. Once a commercial fur farm, Spring Valley Wildlife Area exhibits the abundance of waterfowl and other wildlife common in wetlands, brushlands, and upland forest areas. More than 230 species of birds have been recorded here.

Franklin

, OH

The oldest known structure standing in Franklin, the Old Log Post Office is a reminder of the links the community’s earliest members maintained to the rest of the young state of Ohio and to the United States during the early nineteenth century. John Noble Cumming Schenck, older brother of one of the founders of Franklin, William C. Schenck, established a store here in 1802. In 1805 President Thomas Jefferson appointed John Schenck postmaster of Franklin, a position he held until 1829. Schenck’s store is considered Franklin’s first post office and was one of the first four in Warren County. This building first stood at 310 South River Street and over the years was completely covered by additions and clapboards. They were removed in October 1974 and the house was moved to this location on December 6 of that year. In 1976 the structure was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

80 W. State Street
Springboro

, OH

Jonathan Wright (1782-1855) and his wife Mary Bateman Wright (1787-1866) moved with their five children from Menallen, Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 1814 and built this Federal style house. Using skills acquired from his father, Joel Wright, a surveyor who platted the city of Columbus, Jonathan platted the village of “Springborough,” named for the many springs in the vicinity. The Wright family established and operated a woolen factory, two flour mills, a general store, and a 320-acre farm in the Springboro area. The Wrights were active members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) and strongly opposed slavery. The house was a station on the Underground Railroad, offering assistance to runaway slaves during their flight to freedom. Many members of the Wright family, including Jonathan, Mary, and four of their children, are buried in the Friends Cemetery on nearby Factory Road.