Results for: sandusky
423 Croghan Street
Fremont

, OH

War of 1812. Victoriously defended by Major George Croghan. Battle of Fort Stephenson. August 2, 1813. Built on this spot 1812-1813 and named for Col. Mills Stephenson, one of its builders.

901 Rawson Avenue
Fremont

, OH

Here Bradstreet’s British expedition camped in 1764. Also farthest point west reached by colonial forces under command of Col. Israel Putnam. These grounds purchased in 1870 by the Sandusky County Agricultural Society.

Clyde

, OH

Named for Major General James B. McPherson, buried here July 29, 1864. Here also are graves of George Burton Meek, U.S.N., first American serviceman killed in the War with Spain; Congressional Medal of Honor recipients Charles H. McCleary, Civil War, and Rodger W. Young, World War II; Emma Anderson, mother of author Sherwood Anderson.

Clyde

, OH

Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941), author of 27 works, gave up a successful business career in Elyria, Ohio, to concentrate on writing. Born in Camden, Anderson spent his formative years (1884-1895) in Clyde, and in 1919 he published his most notable book, Winesburg, Ohio. Clyde and small-town Ohio inspired many of its tales. Critics also praised his short story collections, including The Triumph of the Egg (1921) and Death in the Woods (1933). Commercially successful as a writer, Anderson moved to rural Virginia, where in 1927 he purchased and operated two newspapers while continuing his literary career. Through his writings and encouragement he was a major influence to a younger generation of writers, including William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, and John Steinbeck. Sherwood Anderson is buried in Marion, Virginia.

442 W. Main Street
Bellevue

, OH

Born in Pennsylvania in 1791, Bishop John Seybert came to Ohio in 1822 and preached throughout the mid-west. Seybert served the faith for forty years as an itinerant preacher, a presiding elder, and the first bishop of the Evangelical Association, one of the original denominations that is now part of the United Methodist Church. As a circuit rider, he traveled on foot, horseback, and spring wagon a distance of 175,000 miles, preached 9,850 sermons, held 8,000 prayer and class meetings, and made about 46,000 pastoral calls and 10,000 calls on the sick. Seybert often paid his own expenses on the meager salary of $100 per year. He died in 1860 and is buried in the Bellevue – Flat Rock area.

219 W. Main Street
Woodville

, OH

The first road to traverse Sandusky County through the Black Swamp was little more than a muddy path connecting Lower Sandusky (Fremont( and Perrysburg with Woodville. The arduous task of clearing the 120-foot-wide road through the swampy forest was completed within four years. By 1842, the work of stoning the road and draining adjacent lands was completed. Tolls were collected to maintain the road, and it became known as the Maumee and Western Reserve Turnpike. After 1888 it became a toll-free road and today is State Route 20.

401 North Broadway
Green Springs

, OH

In 1817 the United States government signed a treaty with a number of Native American tribes in northern Ohio, including the Seneca Indians. The Fort Meigs or Maumee Rapids Treaty bound the Seneca tribe to cede all claims to land north of the Greenville Treaty line, and in return they received a 40,000 acre reservation at Lower Sandusky (Fremont) and a $500 annuity to be paid each year in perpetuity. The reservation’s boundary began 1.5 miles north of here and extended 6.5 miles to the south. The width of the reservation was 8 miles with the western boundary at the Sandusky River. Beginning in 1830, with a policy of Indian removal developed by the administration of Andrew Jackson, tribes east of the Mississippi River were pressured to move to reservations in the West. The Seneca Indians moved to northeast Oklahoma in 1831.

Fremont

, OH

The twenty-five acre estate Spiegel Grove was the home of Rutherford Birchard Hayes, the 19th president of the United States. Spiegel Grove received its name from the German word “spiegel,” meaning mirror, describing pools that collect beneath the trees after a rainstorm. Hayes’s uncle, Sardis Birchard, a Fremont merchant, built the home on this site in 1863. The Hayeses moved to Spiegel Grove after Hayes’s second term as Ohio governor ended in 1873. They inherited the estate in 1874. The family left Fremont after Hayes’s election as Ohio governor in 1875, and U.S. president in 1876. They returned to Spiegel Grove in 1881. The Hayeses expanded the home in 1880 and 1889. Lucy and Rutherford Hayes died at Spiegel Grove in 1889 and 1893 respectively. They were reburied at Spiegel Grove in 1915. Their children donated the property to the state of Ohio in 1909 in order to establish the nation’s first presidential library.