Results for: beach-park
126 Washington Boulevard
Boardman

, OH

Southern Park Stables, at 126 Washington Boulevard in Boardman, was the private training stable of Attorney David Arrel and was built circa 1912 to house his standardbred horses racing at Southern Park Trotting Track one block south. The Stables is the last remaining structure of a large complex known as Southern Park, which included not only the racetrack and accompanying stables, grandstand, and outbuildings, but a dance hall, picnic pavilions, and baseball diamonds. The park was a favorite destination for Youngstown city residents wishing to relax in the country, and many company picnics were held here. Janie S. Jenkins has lived at Southern Park Stables since 1946 and deeded it and 8.33 acres to the Boardman Township Park District in 1993 with restrictions that it be forever preserved. The wrought iron gates at the driveway entrance were originally the main entrance gates for the racetrack.

Buckeye Lake State Park’s North Shore Area
Buckeye Lake

, OH

Using a four-mile long dam, the state of Ohio impounded the Licking Summit Reservoir in the mid-1820s to supply water for the Ohio and Erie Canal. In 1894, the state renamed it Buckeye Lake and developed it for recreational use. The Columbus, Buckeye Lake, and Newark Traction Company developed an “electric park” here, bringing in excursionists on interurban cars between 1904 and 1929 and creating one of the region’s most popular resorts. Hotels and summer cottages proliferated on leased ground. Nine acres in size, the park featured daily free admission during the summer. (continued on other side)

Locust Street
Ripley

, OH

Charles Young in Ripley. Upon his death in 1922, Colonel Charles Young was the highest ranking African American officer in the United States Army. Born into slavery in Kentucky in 1864, Young moved to Ripley with his parents Gabriel and Arminta in the 1870s. He excelled academically, graduating with honors from Ripley High School in 1881 and accepted a teaching position in Ripley’s African American school thereafter. Encouraged by his father, a Civil War veteran, mentored by J. T. Whitman, superintendent of the school, and John P. Parker, entrepreneur and former Underground Railroad conductor, Young sought and accepted, in 1884, an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point. He was the third African American to graduate, in 1889, and the last to do so until Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. in 1936.

Toledo

, OH

Now ranked among the country’s finest, the zoo began in 1900 with one large woodchuck in a box at Walbridge Park. After the organization of the Toledo Zoological Society, 1905-10, the zoo began its steady growth, particularly after 1923 under the leadership of Percy C. Jones. An ambitious federal construction program during the Great Depression of the 1930s provided several major structures.

525 West Riverview Avenue
Dayton

, OH

The first Masonic Lodge in Dayton was founded in 1808, located in the first Montgomery County Courthouse. Various other locations were home to Masons in Dayton, but by World War I, rapid growth of the Masonic community called for the creation of a new Lodge building. Masons of the time, including civic and business leaders of Dayton, conceived the idea of a new Masonic Center located on the hill at Belmonte Park North and Riverview Avenue. Ground was broken and construction of the $2.5 million Masonic Temple began on July 20, 1925. Through contributions from the Masonic community, the tremendous task of raising a majority of the building cost, $1.5 million, was accomplished in merely ten days in 1924. It is doubtful that the Temple could be duplicated given the fact that the large quantities of marble and mahogany and cherry woods used in construction would be difficult to procure today.

3007 Harding Highway E (OH 309)
Marion

, OH

Early in 1942, during World War II, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers acquired 640 acres along two miles of U. S. Route 30 South (now State Route 309) from ten landowners. By June 11 of that year, the farm families were removed and construction of The Marion Engineer Depot (MED) began, costing $4 million. The first military encampment in Marion County, the 333rd Engineering Regiment, arrived in May and established its camp in a wheat field. They lived in tents while constructing streets and railroad tracks around the Depot. MED was dedicated on December 7, 1942. During the war, food, munitions, equipment, and other military supplies flowed in and out of MED and heavy machinery was renovated. Peak employment came in July 1944 with 1,487 civilian and 47 military personnel on site. (Continued on other side)

6601 Lexington Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

League Park opened on May 1, 1891, with the legendary Cy Young pitching for the Cleveland Spiders in their win over the Cincinnati Redlegs. The park remained the home of Cleveland’s professional baseball and football teams until 1946. In 1920 the Cleveland Indians’ Elmer Smith hit the first grand slam home run, and Bill Wamby executed the only unassisted triple play, in World Series history. Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run over the park’s short right field wall in 1929. With the park as home field, the Cleveland Buckeyes won the Negro World Series in 1945.

E side of Intersection of Symmes Road and Marl Road
Wright Patterson AFB

, OH

Huffman Prairie Flying Field, a unit of the Dayton Heritage National Historical Park, is the site where Wilbur and Orville Wright flew and perfected the world’s first practical airplane, the 1905 Wright Flyer III, after their first flights in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903. The Wright brothers mastered the principles of controlled, powered flight at Huffman Prairie during 1904 and 1905. From 1910 to 1915, they operated the Wright School of Aviation here, training many of the world’s first pilots, including many military pilots.