Remarkable Ohio

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720 Plum Street
Cincinnati

, OH

This historic synagogue symbolizes the work of one of the most important figures in nineteenth-century American Jewry, Isaac Mayer Wise (1819-1900). The Bohemian-born rabbi’s many achievements include the establishment of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations in 1873, Hebrew Union College in 1875, and the Central Conference of American Rabbis in 1889. Wise’s leadership made Cincinnati a center for Reform Judaism in America. The Plum Street Temple, designed by Cincinnati architect James Keys Wilson and built in 1865-1866 for the B’nai Yeshurun congregation during Wise’s tenure, is one of the best-preserved Moorish Revival buildings in the United States. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

1302 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

On October 31, 1963, the actions of Cleveland Police Detective Martin J. McFadden led to a new legal standard allowing police officers in the United States to stop and frisk suspicious persons prior to committing a crime. On that day McFadden had spotted three men loitering outside a jewelry store at 1276 Euclid Avenue. Believing a robbery was about to take place, the 38-year veteran stopped the men and checked them for weapons. Two of them had guns and were charged with, and convicted of, carrying concealed weapons. The law at the time allowed officers to stop a suspect only after a crime was committed. They appealed their case all the way to the United States Supreme Court. In a landmark decision on June 10, 1968, Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered the court’s opinion that McFadden’s action, called a “Terry Stop” after one of the suspects, was justifiable.

Along E. Broad Street. – Near Statehouse Parking Garage
Columbus

, OH

In 1812, the Ohio legislature designated Columbus as the state capital, with local landowners contributing land and resources for a capitol building and penitentiary. The first Columbus statehouse, a Federal-style structure completed in 1816, stood on the northeast corner of State and High streets. By the 1830s, the need for a more substantial structure was apparent. Cincinnati architect Thomas Walter won the 1838 capitol design contest, though the final design incorporated several designers’ ideas, including prominent Hudson River School artist Thomas Cole. Construction proceeded slowly between 1839 and 1861, weathering political fights, prison labor disputes, and a cholera epidemic. Interior work was sufficiently complete by January 1857 for the legislature to hold its first session in the new capitol. A National Historic Landmark, the Ohio Statehouse stands as one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in America.

11508 Mayfield
Cleveland

, OH

The Cozad-Bates House is one of the oldest remaining structures in Cleveland’s University Circle. The original section, built circa 1853, is the only pre-Civil War residential structure left in the neighborhood. Built by Samuel and Jane Cozad’s son, Andrew Cozad, the first section used locally made brick to form a simple two-story, one-room-deep, vernacular English-I house. The family owned a large portion of the land which is now occupied by University Circle. Justus Cozad, Andrew’s son, returning from the west where he worked as a railroad superintendent and civil engineer, built the later section on Mayfield Road for his larger family in 1872. It is a rare surviving example of Italianate-influenced residential architecture, including a hipped roof, curved bay windows, paired eave brackets, and prominent belvedere. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 and designated as a Cleveland Landmark in 2006.

6901 Woodland Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

Howard Daniels, who lived from 1815-1863, was a noted architect and landscape gardener. Over the course of his life, he designed six Ohio and New York cemeteries, including Woodland that began in 1852 when he laid out 20 of its 60 acres into fashionable “rural cemetery” style. Later acreage in the cemetery adapted his curvilinear design. “As beautifully prepared for a burial place as fancy and taste could desire,” Woodland was dedicated on June 14, 1853, and became Cleveland’s primary cemetery. An ornate gatehouse, chapel, and fountains came later. Generations of Clevelanders, pioneering and prominent, as well as veterans onward from the War of 1812, are buried here. For more than a century, Woodland, in its original and newly platted sections, has embraced people from every race, the rich and poor, natives and immigrants, and the famous and obscure. It has truly become a community cemetery. [continued on other side]

5050 Porter Rd
North Olmsted

, OH

The Universalist religious movement spread across Ohio as the state was settled in the 1800s. Universalists proclaimed a loving God and universal salvation. Believers were sometimes scorned as “no-Hell-ers.” Olmsted’s First Universalist Society was founded in 1834. Early church members included Olmsted pioneers Asher Coe, David Stearns, Charles Olmsted, Elias Frost, and their families. Initially, services were held in the Union House of Worship, which Universalists shared with Methodists and Presbyterians. In 1847, the Olmsted Universalist congregation built this Greek Revival style church at the corner of Butternut and Coe Ridge (now Lorain) Roads. John Ames supervised the construction of the building, which cost $974. The church bell in use today was cast in Boston in 1851. The bell sounded the alarm for fires and tolled when community members died, as well as announcing worship services.

570 West Broad Street
Columbus

, OH

Thomas Jefferson was president when the original two-story Federal-style brick building was built in 1807. The house is located on the east half of in-lot 123, a part of Franklinton since its beginning. Surveyed by Nathanial Massie on October 28, 1796, the lot was part of Virginia Military District entry #1393, comprising 1,000 acres on the west fork of the Scioto River. Captain Robert Vance, a veteran of Virginia Continental Line during the Revolution, claimed the land. Lucas Sullivant, the founder of Franklinton, acquired it from Vance. The acreage was a part of the 1797 plat of Franklinton, recorded by Sullivant in 1802 at the Ross County Courthouse in Chillicothe. Franklinton became Franklin County’s first seat in 1803 and preceded the founding of Columbus by 15 years. In its early years, Franklinton’s nearest neighbors were the Wyndat and Haudenosaunee people. (Continued on other side)

Cuyahoga County Court House, 1 West Lakeside Avenue
Cleveland

, OH

This nation’s landmark case on the U.S. Constitution’s Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures began in Cuyahoga County. In 1967, for the first time in history, African-Americans both argued and heard a case at the U.S. Supreme Court. Defense attorney Louis Stokes and assistant prosecutor Reuben Payne debated limits on police searches before the first African-American Supreme Court Justice, Thurgood Marshall. The Supreme Court held that Officer Martin McFadden’s frisk and seizure of guns from suspects on Euclid Avenue about to rob a jewelry store was constitutional. They upheld Cuyahoga County Appellate Court Judges Joseph Silbert, Joseph Artl, and J.J.P. Corrigan and adopted the rule trial Judge Bernard Friedman issued: Police may search for weapons if they have a reasonable suspicion that a suspect is armed and dangerous.