Results for: science
106 N Main Street
Oberlin

, OH

First Church was built by the Oberlin Community in 1842-44 for the great evangelist Charles Grandison Finney (1792-1875). He was its pastor, headed Oberlin College’s Theology Department, and later became College president. In the mid-19th century this Congregational church had one of the largest congregations and auditoriums west of the Alleghenies. Eminent speakers such as Margaret Atwood, Angela Davis, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., Mark Twain, and Woodrow Wilson have addressed the community in its Meeting House. Antoinette Brown graduated from the College’s Ladies’ Department in 1847 and then completed three years of study under Finney in the all male Theology Department. She worshipped and led women’s prayer meetings at First Church. The College denied her the Theology certificate since women were not deemed suitable to be ordained. (continued on other side)

2553 Parkman Road NW / US 422
Warren

, OH

Dr. Ronald A. Parise (1951-2008), from Warren, was a payload specialist for the Astro 1, Columbia, and Astro 2, Endeavour, space shuttle missions in 1990 and 1995. He logged in more than 614 hours in space. Among his scientific studies, Parise (WA4SIR) brought amateur radio equipment aboard the shuttle, enabling crew members to communicate with schools and others on Earth. Dr. Parise held planning and communications engineering support roles for human space flight projects, including the Russian space station Mir, the International Space Station and the X-38, a vehicle intended to return astronauts to earth from space. Dr. Parise was involved with many research projects, including the evolution of stars in globular clusters, which resulted in several publications. (Continued on other side)

1775 Main St
Peninsula

, OH

In 1887, John Eisenmann designed this stick-style building for the Peninsula Board of Education so that it could consolidate two one-room school houses. The Peninsula and the Boston Township Boards of Education merged in 1919. The brick addition, designed by architects Harpster and Bliss, was built in 1920. The trustees of Boston Township purchased this property in 1939 from the Board of Education. Union Grange #2380 occupied the first floor for nearly 50 years. The non-profit Boston Township Hall Committee, Inc. was formed in 1990 to work with the township trustees to restore the building.

NE corner of St. Clair Avenue and E 105th Street
Cleveland

, OH

Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, two Glenville High School students imbued with imagination and talent and passion for science fiction and comics, had dream become reality in 1932. They created Superman, the first of the superheroes ever to see print. The 1932 prototype was of a villainous superhero. Superman then became the hero who has been called the Action Ace, the Man of Steel, and the Man of Tomorrow. (continued on other side)

300 Front Street/OH 237
Berea

, OH

In 1845, Baldwin Institute, one of the first schools in the area open to all students regardless of gender, race, or creed, was chartered. The wealth generated by the sandstone and grindstone industries of Berea allowed John Baldwin to found the school. Ten years later, officials rechartered the school and renamed it Baldwin University. By the 1880s, the expanding quarries began to encroach on the original campus of the university, forcing it to relocate. In 1891, ground was broken for the new campus at the corner of Front Street and Bagley Road. Recitation Hall, renamed Wheeler Hall, was the first new building, followed by the Philura Gould Baldwin Memorial Library in 1894. In 1905, through the funding of the Carnegie Foundation, the Ladies Hall, renamed Carnegie Hall, was moved stone by stone to the new campus to serve as the science building. Baldwin University merged with German-Wallace College in 1913 to become Baldwin-Wallace College.

379 W. 8th Avenue
Columbus

, OH

In 1968, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) established the first practicing Vedic Temple in the state of Ohio. This building represents the beginning of a now growing population of Vaisnavas, worshipers of Vishnu or Krishna, in Ohio who have integrated into the mainstream daily life here without forsaking their own unique traditions. Daily worship ceremonies, formally installed deities, marriage ceremonies, final rites, and many other significant ceremonies related to Vedic culture are practiced at the temple. These ceremonies are prevailed over by authorized Pujaris or priests. The ISKCON House upholds and represents those values sacred to Vedic culture: peacefulness, tolerance, equanimity, patience, truthfulness, honesty, austerity, and mercy. In this sacred place, there is no breaking of the regulative principles of Dharma (religion): no meat eating, no intoxication, no gambling, and no illicit sex (outside marriage).

12900 Snow Rd
Parma

, OH

On April 29, 1879, using arc carbons from the forerunner of the National Carbon Company, the City of Cleveland was illuminated by the world’s first practical electric street lamp. The National Carbon Company was founded in 1886 and earned recognition for its lifesaving carbon-filtered gas masks for World War I soldiers and reentry parts for the spacecraft that captivated the nation in the 1960s. The company also received an Academy Award for its contributions to motion picture photography in 1956. At this location in 1956, The National Carbon Company opened its Parma Research Laboratory. This facility became global headquarters for GrafTech International in 2006. On the company’s 125th anniversary of pioneering innovation in advanced energy graphite material science, it owned nearly 800 patents and patent-pending applications.

1911 West 30th Street
Cleveland

, OH

In 1886, Bishop Richard Gilmour (1824-1891) of the Roman Catholic diocese of Cleveland requested that the Jesuit superior of Buffalo establish a high school on Cleveland’s west side. The Jesuits, an order of the Roman Catholic Church founded by St. Ignatius Loyola in 1540, sought to establish schools that instilled a zeal for the Gospel and a love of learning. Under the leadership of Father Henry Behren, S.J. (1815-1895), the twentieth Jesuit secondary school in the United States opened in September 1886. Named Saint Ignatius College, the school grew from 76 students in 1886 to 490 in 1924. In 1924, the College split into two separate institutions: John Carroll University, which moved to University Heights in 1935, and Saint Ignatius High School, which remains on its original site. (Continued on other side)