Remarkable Ohio

Results for: food-processing
201 E Water Street
Troy

, OH

Benjamin Overfield (1774-1831), son of a Revolutionary War soldier, opened his tavern in this log house on September 13, 1808. Never moved, it is the oldest surviving building in Troy. The tavern provided food, lodging and space for business and social gatherings. Overfield agreed to let the county use a room on the second floor of the building as a temporary courtroom. Behind the tavern, Benjamin built a small log cabin that was home to his family. He prospered here until 1825 when he moved to the Public Square. Today’s structure includes the tavern, the cabin, and later additions. Used as a dwelling from 1825 until 1948, the building now houses the Overfield Tavern Museum. Benjamin Overfield and his first wife Mary are buried in Rose Hill Cemetery.

Jackson Street
Vinton

, OH

During the American Civil War 1860-1865, a Confederate cavalry, led by Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan, infiltrated the states of Kentucky, southern Indiana, and southeastern Ohio as a diversionary tactic to draw northern troops from eastern Tennessee. The 2,500 calvarymen passed through Gallia County, Ohio, and reached the village of Vinton on July 17, 1863. The Rebels plundered the town searching for horses, food, and forage. Near this marker, they crossed the covered bridge over Big Raccoon Creek and then burned the 120-foot structure behind them. Area residents were left unharmed and no lives were lost.

NE corner of E. Front Street and Pike Avenue
Manchester

, OH

Manchester was founded in 1791 by Nathaniel Massie as a base to survey the land warrants of American Revolutionary War soldiers in the Virginia Military District. This bank of the Ohio River provided a secure site for the last civilian stockade built in Ohio. The natural protection of this fortification included marshland to the west and north and the river on the south. The nearby three islands provided a safe place for retreat in dangerous circumstances and also supplied an area to raise food in its rich bottomlands. The invention of the steam powered paddle wheel boat allowed the river to become the city’s main source of shipping and commerce in the nineteenth century. Manchester was an important port of call for provisions; the export of agricultural products; and the manufacture of goods such as pottery, furniture, and leather goods.

18671 OH 554
Bidwell

, OH

The New Hope Baptist Church was organized around 1860, burned in 1863, and was rebuilt in the fall of 1864. Once called the Harris Colored Baptist Church, the edifice’s name “New Hope” was chosen because it represented the hope of people struggling for a new beginning and a place to worship God. The church’s graveyard is the burial place of members of the United States Colored Troops, veterans of the Civil War. The war itself also came to the Harrisburg area. Units of Confederate general John Hunt Morgan’s infamous raiders rode through northern Gallia County on July 18, 1863, taking for themselves horses, food, and valuables. In pursuit, Union forces confiscated horses, hay, and other goods from area residents, including those of two men from Harrisburg.

7669 Stagers Loop
Delaware

, OH

Known as the “Halfway House,” the Gooding House and Tavern was built by George B. Gooding halfway between the towns of Worthington and Delaware in 1827. Its location was influenced by construction of the Columbus and Sandusky Turnpike that was chartered by the State of Ohio the year before. Also known as the “Mud Pike,” the turnpike was slow and difficult for travelers and could take nearly a day to travel 10 miles. The Gooding House was the perfect place for stagecoach drivers to change teams of horses and for travelers to rest and have refreshments. George Gooding also prospered as a farmer with over 1,000 acres of land. This stately brick farmstead remained in the Gooding family for 175 years with each succeeding generation adding its imprint on the property. The Gooding House and Tavern was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005 and restored in 2007.

791 Farmview Rd (located on OH 588 just off US Route 35)
Bidwell

, OH

Bob Evans was born on May 30, 1918 in Sugar Ridge, Ohio. He married Jewell Waters in 1940 and moved to Gallipolis, Ohio. In 1946 Bob took the first step in what would later become Bob Evans Farms, Inc., when he opened a 12-seat diner in Gallipolis. Bob, unsatisfied with the quality of the sausage he was able to purchase to serve in his diner, created his own recipe. Before long, Bob Evans was selling his sausage to grocery stores and meat markets.

1501 W Martin Luther King Way (W. 3rd Street)
Dayton

, OH

The Euclid Avenue United Brethren Church, later the Mount Enon Missionary Baptist Church, was erected at Third & Euclid Street in Dayton. Milton Wright, a bishop of the church, was present at the laying of the cornerstone on May 28, 1911. Bishop and Mrs. Susan (Koerner) Wright were the parents of Orville and Wilbur Wright and their siblings Reuchlin, Lorin and Katherine. The church’s congregation included Orville and Katherine Wright and other notable Daytonians such as local historian and former pastor Dr. Augustus W. Drury, food distributor and potato chip maker Daniel Mikesell and Prof. Josiah P. Landis of the Bonebrake Theological Seminary. The church playedd a role in offering aid during the disasterous flood of 1913.

675 Price Road
Newark

, OH

Tuberculosis, or TB, is a contagious disease that was responsible for the deaths of one out of every seven people in the U.S. in the early 20th century. The Licking County Tuberculosis Sanatorium, known as the TB San, was constructed in 1931-1932 at a cost of $250,000. The facility kept TB patients separate from the general population, controlling the spread of disease. The location provided patients with rest, fresh air, food, and exercise, the main treatments for TB in the 19th through mid-20th centuries. (Continued on other side)