Remarkable Ohio

Results for: aviation
Butler County Regional Airport – Hogan Field, 2820 East Airport Drive
Hamilton

, OH

The Hogan Family owned and operated what was known as the Hamilton Airport for over 52 years. Airplane owner and pilot, Carl “Pop” Muhlberger and aviation enthusiast and farmer, Joe Hogan, co-founded the airport in July 1929. Muhlberger taught Joe to fly and in return, Joe managed and maintained the field. During the Great Depression, Muhlberger could not afford to operate the airport, closing in July 1932. With financial backing from Joe’s older brother, Charles, and their father, William, the family purchased and reopened the airport. Running the airport was a family affair. Joe taught his brothers, Bill, Bernie, and Art to fly. They raised money to run the airport by barnstorming, sightseeing flights, and flying lessons. Sisters, Mary Ann, Katie, and Loretta (Sauer), also flew. They, along with their mother Emma, helped run the airport and its restaurant. (Continued on other side)

2241 Johns Circle
Columbus

, OH

America’s World War I “Ace of Aces,” Edward Vernon Rickenbacker was born in Columbus in 1890 to Swiss immigrant parents, leaving school at age 12 to help support his family. Working for several Columbus automobile companies initiated his love of racing, and he achieved fame as a race driver and team owner between 1910 and 1916. Enlisting in the U.S. Army in 1917, he went to France as staff driver for General John Pershing with ambitions of becoming a combat flier. He managed a transfer to the American Expeditionary Force’s Aviation Instruction Center, learned to fly, and was assigned to the 94th Aero Squadron, the famed “Hat in the Ring” squadron led by ace Raoul Lufbery. (continued on other side)

2121 Tuttle Park Place
Columbus

, OH

A primary architect of American air power, Curtis Emerson LeMay was born in Columbus in 1906, attended public schools, and graduated from The Ohio State University with a degree in civil engineering. He received his flight training through the Reserve Officers Training Corps and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in 1929. Before World War II, he pioneered air routes to Africa and England; during the war he developed tactical and strategic doctrine used in bombing operations in Europe and the South Pacific, often leading his forces in combat. He was promoted to general in 1944. In 1947, following the organization of the U.S.Air Force (USAF), LeMay was appointed commander of USAF Europe, directing operations during the Berlin Airlift at the dawn of the Cold War. (continued on other side)