Remarkable Ohio

Results for: aviation
1636 N. Main Street
Urbana

, OH

Raised in an Ohio orphanage, Warren G. Grimes (1898-1975) ran away after finishing the ninth grade and at age 16 went to work for the Ford Motor Company in Detroit. He later became a partner in an electrical business where he was instrumental in designing and developing the first lights for the Ford Tri-Motor airplane. In 1930 Grimes moved to Urbana and founded a small lighting fixture plant, Grimes Manufacturing. The inventor of the familiar red, green, and white navigation lights found on the wing tips and tails of aircraft, Grimes, known as the “Father of the Aircraft Lighting Industry,” also developed other aircraft fixtures, including landing, instrumental, and interior lights. Every American-made airplane flown during World War II was equipped with Grimes lights. Grimes served as mayor of Urbana and chairman of the State of Ohio Aviation Board.

E side of Intersection of Symmes Road and Marl Road
Wright Patterson AFB

, OH

Huffman Prairie Flying Field, a unit of the Dayton Heritage National Historical Park, is the site where Wilbur and Orville Wright flew and perfected the world’s first practical airplane, the 1905 Wright Flyer III, after their first flights in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in 1903. The Wright brothers mastered the principles of controlled, powered flight at Huffman Prairie during 1904 and 1905. From 1910 to 1915, they operated the Wright School of Aviation here, training many of the world’s first pilots, including many military pilots.

12609 State Route 113
Birmingham

, OH

Marion A. Harrison established M.A. Harrison Memorial Airfield, formerly Harrison Airport, in 1946 on land encompassing 80 acres. This facility served to promote aviation activities in the Birmingham community with flight charters, flight instruction, and rides. Birmingham Metal Products was located here during World War II producing fighter aircraft fuel parts, and the airfield was used to train civilian pilots. Today, it remains dedicated to flight.

North Bend Blvd
Dayton

, OH

Interest in the new field of aeronautics grew dramatically when the United States entered the World War I in 1917. The army chose Dayton as the site for a research-and-development program for military aviation because of the area’s transportation links to major cities and its engineering and testing facilities. McCook Field, north of downtown between Keowee Street and the Great Miami River, was charged with researching, developing, and testing military airplanes and accessories. For nearly a decade, many advancements in aviation occurred at McCook Field. They included new aircraft, controllable-pitch propellers, bulletproof gas tanks, free-fall parachutes, and night-observation cameras. In the 1920s, larger and more-powerful aircraft overwhelmed the small field, which featured a large sign to warn pilots: “This field is small. Use it all.” In 1927, aeronautical engineering was transferred to newly-created Wright Field, now a part of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

1800 Triplett Blvd
Akron

, OH

The innovations of Dr. Karl Arnstein (1887-1974), an aerospace industry pioneer, form the foundation for lighter-than-air technology in use today. His mathematical proof and application of modern stress analysis allowed the construction of larger, stronger rigid airships. Born in Prague, he led airship design at the Luftschiffbau-Zeppelin Company in Germany. Dr. Arnstein immigrated to Akron, Ohio, in 1924 to serve as vice-president of engineering at Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation. With his team of twelve German immigrant engineers, Arnstein oversaw development of the Navy’s dirigibles Akron and Macon. He received 35 U.S. aviation related patents, from designs for hollow metal girders to an aerodynamic airship hanger, the Airdock in Akron. From 1940 until retirement in 1957, Dr. Arnstein headed engineering at Goodyear Aircraft Corporation, a leading aerospace contractor, which produced more than 200 Navy blimps, 4,000 Corsair fighter planes, plus airplane and missile parts.

Just E of 4383 East Broad Street
Whitehall

, OH

The first airport in central Ohio, Norton Field was named for World War I pilot and star Ohio State University athlete Fred William Norton, a Columbus native. On July 2, 1918, Capt. Norton led the 27th “Eagle” Pursuit Squadron in one of the earliest significant American air engagements of World War I. He died from wounds after his Nieuport 28 was shot down in northern France less than three weeks later. Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker attended the dedication ceremonies for Norton Field on June 30, 1923, as Columbus received its first air mail delivery. Norton Field became the headquarters for the 308th Observation Squadron, made up of local reservists, many of whom were members of the Aero Club of Columbus that had lobbied for the establishment of the airport by the War Department.

4033 North River Road NE
Warren

, OH

Ernest “Ernie” C. Hall, a pioneer of early flight who is widely recognized for his long career in aviation, was born near Warren, Ohio in 1890. A friend of the Wright brother, Hall built his first powered airplane in 1909 and flew in 1911. He began his career as a civilian flight instructor in 1913, opening a flying school in Pennsylvania in 1915. During World War I, he transferred to Call Field in Wichita Falls, Texas, where he trained over 500 military pilots for combat. In 1922, Hall relocated his flight school to Warren, Ohio, where he taught unitl his death in 1972. His 1911 monoplanes have been displayed at the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum in Washington D.C. and the National Museum of U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

Butler County Regional Airport – Hogan Field, 2820 East Airport Drive
Hamilton

, OH

The Hogan Family owned and operated what was known as the Hamilton Airport for over 52 years. Airplane owner and pilot, Carl “Pop” Muhlberger and aviation enthusiast and farmer, Joe Hogan, co-founded the airport in July 1929. Muhlberger taught Joe to fly and in return, Joe managed and maintained the field. During the Great Depression, Muhlberger could not afford to operate the airport, closing in July 1932. With financial backing from Joe’s older brother, Charles, and their father, William, the family purchased and reopened the airport. Running the airport was a family affair. Joe taught his brothers, Bill, Bernie, and Art to fly. They raised money to run the airport by barnstorming, sightseeing flights, and flying lessons. Sisters, Mary Ann, Katie, and Loretta (Sauer), also flew. They, along with their mother Emma, helped run the airport and its restaurant. (Continued on other side)