Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=6b3beacdff1e02c5a01a9672d02ccbf6&swpmtxnonce=00e25ab8f1/30/&toll-house
36 S. Main Street
Niles

, OH

One of seven native Ohioans to serve as president of the United States, William McKinley (1843-1901) was born at this site. The original house was moved from this site and ultimately destroyed by fire. The McKinleys lived here until 1852 when they moved to Poland, Ohio, where William attended the Poland Seminary. He briefly attended Allegheny College in Pennsylvania, but poor health and family financial strain forced him to return to Ohio. As an enlistee in the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War, McKinley rose to the rank of major. After the war, he settled in Canton and practiced law. Elected to Congress in 1876, McKinley favored high protective tariffs, a policy he continued to support as President.(Continued on other side)

Across from 4750 Cincinnati Brookville Rd/OH 126
Shandon

, OH

The foundation for the first Welsh settlement in Ohio was laid on June 29, 1801, when William and Morgan Gwilym purchased land in what is now Morgan Township at the Cincinnati Land Office. The Welsh, who settled in Pennsylvania beginning in the late eighteenth century, moved westward and settled here in 1802. This area was also the major terminus for the 1818 migration from Montgomeryshire and Cardiganshire in Wales. In 1803 a Congregational Church was organized and services were held in members’ homes or outdoors. A brick Meetinghouse, complete with a Welsh death door leading to the cemetery, was constructed in 1824. The building now serves as the Community House. The present brick church was built in 1854. For many years, the library, formed in 1852, was housed in the New London Special School District building that stood on this site. (Continued on other side)

11347 Oxford Road
Harrison

, OH

The United Society of Believers (or “Shakers,” as they are commonly known) established White Water, the last of four Ohio Shaker villages, in 1824. White Water flourished throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. At its peak during the 1850s, 150 Believers living in three semi-autonomous Shaker “families” farmed 1,300 acres of land in Crosby and adjacent Morgan townships. The Shakers were among the most successful religious societies in the United States. Belief in the equality of men and women, separation of the sexes, celibacy, communal ownership of property, and a distinctive style of worship — characterized by rhythmic movements and shaking — helped define the Shaker lifestyle. (Continued on other side)

4821 Burkhardt Rd
Dayton

, OH

Lewis and Elizabeth (Lyons) Kemp were settlers of what became Mad River Township. With their eight children, the Kemps arrived here from Frederick County, Maryland around 1806. The stone part of the house was built shortly thereafter. Lewis donated nearby land for what became known as the “Kemp School,” established in 1815, and for a graveyard, which had its first burial in 1816 or 1817. The Kemps also hosted services of the United Brethren church. The Kemp house is an example of a “Saltbox” type, so called because of the long slope of its rear gable roof. It is believed the house’s brick portion was added around 1832.

715 Market Avenue North
Canton

, OH

William McKinley’s house, once located at this site, was the scene of his 1896 front porch campaign for President of the United States. During the campaign McKinley addressed about 750,000 people who came to his home in Canton. McKinley’s public service began when he volunteered at the start of the Civil War in 1861 as a private with the Union Army. He was discharged as a major after four years of service. Later McKinley became President of the Canton Y.M.C.A. and the Stark County Prosecutor. McKinley served in the United States House of Representatives between 1877 and 1891 and was then elected Governor of Ohio. He helped to found the Canton Public Library. McKinley won presidential elections in 1896 and 1900. His administration was characterized by high tariffs, money backed by gold, national prosperity, and the Spanish-American War. In 1901 an anarchist shot and killed President McKinley.

2415 N Riverview Rd
Malta

, OH

Rufus P. Stone, grandson of General Rufus Putnam, settled on this 1,000 acre farm and built a wooden farmhouse here in 1818. In 1855, John E. Thomas purchased the original farmhouse and 600 acres from the heirs of Rufus P. Stone. Thomas enlarged the farmhouse into the present manor house with a large sandstone addition in 1857. The farm was known for its extensive orchards and fine livestock, including cattle, sheep, and high quality saddle horses. Thomas, dressed in silk hat, frock coat, and all the finery of the day, rode one of his fine saddle horses around the estate supervising farm laborers. He developed an enclosed nature preserve on the farm for breeding and raising deer that were nearly extinct in Ohio in the 1850s. Thomas later acquired 200 more acres of the original acres for a total of 800 acres.

100 E. McKinley Street
South Lebanon

, OH

The Union Township Hall was a center of community life from the time of its construction around 1907. The hall included the offices of township government, a community hall, and club meeting rooms, a rarer combination in the 21st century. Local government and services occupied the first floor. The second floor “opera house” retains many original features, including the stage and stage backdrops. The hall hosted many types of entertainment, including church choirs and the Knights of Pythias Band. Leaving the township’s possession, the hall was used by various owners for a church, art studio, and bed and breakfast.(Continued on other side)

1126 E. Center Street
Marion

, OH

Marion civic leaders Shauck Elah Barlow and Ida Harsh Barlow built “Waldheim,” their Colonial Revival residence, between 1903-1905. Ida Barlow, then president of the Marion Women’s Club, hosted a December 1905 meeting in her new home. Members discussed art, music, literature, and ideas for “civic improvement.” In 1909, this and other Marion clubs reorganized as the Marion County Federation of Women’s Clubs. Federation members soon organized into action: providing college loans to young women; sponsoring visiting city and later school nurses; purchasing trash receptacles; providing dental clinics for low-income residents; and funding railroad crossing safety equipment. Upon her death in 1945, Barlow bequeathed her house to the Federation as the “Women’s Club Home.” The new Federation headquarters offered meeting space for the Executive Board and the many associated clubs. (Continued on other side)