Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=cf488e53828dedb34896cef8d0837e6d&swpmtxnonce=6e3b79d233/4/&public-schools
15829 Ravenna Rd
Burton

, OH

Called the “Cradle of Equal Suffrage” and “Free Speech Chapel,” Union Chapel was to be “…open and free for all denominations, but to be monopolized by no one or to the exclusion of anyone.” Built in 1858 or 1859 on land donated by Anson Matthews, the chapel reputedly exists in response to incident triggered by James A. Garfield, then principal of the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (now Hiram College) and later president of the United States. He was scheduled to speak at the Congregationists’ “Brick Church” in December 1857. Because of the supposed controversial nature of Garfield’s speech, however, the invitation was withdrawn. (Continued on other side)

325 N. Michigan Street
Toledo

, OH

Toledo High School opened in 1854 on the site of the city’s first log schoolhouse. After an 1895 fire, it was rebuilt and named Central High School. The facility closed in 1914 with the opening of Scott and Waite high schools. It reopened as Woodward Technical School and later became Vocational High. The building was razed in 1938 for construction of the Toledo Public Library.

410 E. Spring Street
Oxford

, OH

William Holmes McGuffey (1800-1873) was a Miami University faculty member in 1836 when he compiled the first edition of the McGuffey Eclectic Reader in this house. His Reader taught lessons in reading, spelling, and civic education by using memorable stories of honesty, hard work, thrift, personal respect, and moral and ethical standards alongside illustrative selections from literary works. The six-edition series increased in difficulty and was developed with the help of his brother Alexander Hamilton McGuffey. After the Civil War the Readers were the basic schoolbooks in thirty-seven states and by 1920 sold an estimated 122 million copies, reshaping American public school curriculum and becoming one of the nation’s most influential publications. (Continued on other side)

SE corner of N. 4th Street and Market Street
Zanesville

, OH

One of America’s leading architects of the early 20th century, Cass Gilbert (1859-1934), was born in a home that stood at this site. After studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Gilbert apprenticed with prominent architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White. The critical success of his first major public building, the design of the 1895 Minnesota State Capitol, established his national reputation. His influential 1912 Woolworth building, at 792 feet, was then the world’s tallest building, earning Gilbert’s nickname of “Father of the Modern Skyscraper.” Combining classical designs with modern technology, Gilbert also created the United State Supreme Court building (1932) in Washington, D.C., an enduring icon of American justice and democracy. His other achievements include the Arkansas and West Virginia capitols, the U.S. Custom House in New York, and several buildings at Oberlin College. Gilbert served as the president of the American Institute of Architects and the National Academy of Design.

121 South Street
Chardon

, OH

Listed on the National register of Historic Places in 1974, this building was the post office from 1940 through 1986. It is an example of the Colonial Revival style common in the 1930s and 1940s. The exterior brick work, large Palladian window, and simple design were common in the building plans for era post offices. This simplicity enabled unskilled workers to be employed in public works projects. The building’s interior still has the original portico, wood and marble-paneled walls, terrazzo floors, and mailing lobby. (Continued on other side)

Freedom Street and White Street
Garrettsville Village

, OH

“I thought of the great bandits of the old West [like] the James Brothers…They knocked over trains, and I was going to pull the same stunt,” exclaimed notorious gangster Alvin “Creepy” Karpis. On November 7, 1935, Karpis and his bandits held up Erie Train #626 at this former location of the Garrettsville Train Depot, escaping with over $46,000 in cash and securities. Because of this last great train heist in American history, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and his Government Men (G-Men) improved their surveillance methods to capture Karpis. Once labeled “Public Enemy Number One,” Alvin Karpis became Hoover’s first arrest on May 1, 1936. Local legend holds that FBI agents flooded this town searching for Karpis and his accomplices, and this led the James A. Garfield School District to adopt the G-Men as the mascot for its athletic teams.

8745 Davis Rd
Maineville

, OH

In 1795, at the age of 23, Jeremiah Morrow came to the Northwest Territory from Pennsylvania. He purchased land along the Little Miami River in Deerfield Township and in 1799 married Mary Parkhill of Pennsylvania. Around 1800 he built this barn which is one of Warren County’s oldest standing structures. In 1801, Morrow was sent to the Second Territorial Assembly and to the first Ohio Constitutional Convention in 1802. In 1803, he was elected the new state’s first U. S. Congressman and was Ohio’s only congressman for ten years. In 1813 the Ohio legislature elevated him to U.S. Senate. In 1822 he became Ohio’s ninth governor. He went on to serve in both the Ohio House and Senate and at age 69 returned to Congress. An extraordinary man, Jeremiah Morrow gave his country 43 years of public service.

1380 Atcheson St
Columbus

, OH

Maryland Park was opened in 1921. It served as the site of the annual Emancipation Day Celebration until 1933. The first Columbus public pool was constructed here in 1929 as the Center of Eastside Social and Recreation Activities. It was home to many black athletes who brought pride and distinction to themselves and to the city.