Remarkable Ohio

Results for: higher-education
1310 Sycamore Street
Cincinnati

, OH

William and Abigail Cutter Woodward founded Woodward High School, the first public high school west of the Allegheny Mountains, on this site October 24, 1831. Concerned that the poor of Cincinnati had no avenues for education, the Woodwards donated land, time, funding, and expertise to this venture that brought the arts and sciences to “those who have not the means of procuring such advantages themselves.” Notables include Dr. Joseph Ray, principal, 1851-1855, author of several popular mathematics texts; Professor William McGuffey, author of the well-known readers and spellers; and William Howard Taft, Class of 1874, former U.S. President. From 1856-1863, the home of Levi and Catherine Coffin was also located on this site. Both were legendary abolitionishts who helped enslaved people escape to freedom in Canada. Levi is often referred to as the “President of the Underground Railroad.”

2550 Lander Road
Pepper Pike

, OH

The first women’s college chartered in the state of Ohio, Ursuline College opened in 1871 in downtown Cleveland as part of the educational mission of the Order of St. Ursula (O.S.U.). Founded in Italy in 1535 with an early presence in North America, this order established its first religious teaching community in Cleveland in 1850, led by foundress Mother Mary of the Annunciation Beaumont, O.S.U. The college’s growth prompted four moves in Cleveland and subsequently to the Pepper Pike campus in 1966. Ursuline holds the distinction as one of the first catholic women’s colleges in the United States organized and chartered explicitly for college education.

NE corner of W Court Street and John Street
Cincinnati

, OH

In 1866, Gaines High School (grades 7-12), one of the first high schools for African Americans in Ohio, opened just west of this site in the same building as the Western District Elementary School, completed in 1859 and enlarged in 1866 and 1868. The school was named for John I. Gaines, whose leadership was responsible for securing passage of the Ohio law authorizing public schools for African Americans. Gaines was clerk and chief administrator of the African American school board when he died in 1859 at age 38. Gaines High School’s Normal Department trained almost all of the African American teachers for southwest Ohio; schools in other states hired many of the students before they had even completed their studies. From 1866-1886, Gaines High School and its principal Peter H. Clark were nationally recognized for their excellence.

1250 Western Avenue
Toledo

, OH

Edward Drummond Libbey High School . Edward Drummond Libbey High School – “the castle on the hill” – opened in 1923 to serve the growing number of students in Toledo Public Schools. The school offered a curriculum of manual and academic training, reflecting a progressive movement during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to democratize education. Libbey High School was named for Edward D. Libbey (1854-1925), a local businessman, civic leader, and philanthropist who founded the Libbey Glass Company and Toledo Museum of Art. Libbey’s successful business ventures earned Toledo the nickname “The Glass Capital of the World.” Much of his fortune was spent on providing cultural and educational institutions that still serve the public as of 2018. (Continued on other side)

5545 Belmont Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

The first in a succession of schools that eventually gave College Hill its name was CARY’S ACADEMY FOR BOYS. Freeman Cary opened this school in his home on Hamilton Avenue in 1832. Success necessitated larger quarters and in 1833 PLEASANT HILL ACADEMY was built at the corner of Hamilton and Colerain (now Belmont) Avenues. Continuing growth and a distinguished faculty led to formation of a college. Money was raised by selling shares, mostly bought by local farmers. FARMERS COLLEGE OF HAMILTON COUNTY was chartered on February 23, 1846 and Cary Hall was built on this Belmont Avenue site in 1847. Future President of the United States, Benjamin Harrison, attended the college from 1848 to 1850. During the 1860s Cary Hall served as a station on the Underground Railroad. (Continued on other side)

379 W. 8th Avenue
Columbus

, OH

In 1968, the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) established the first practicing Vedic Temple in the state of Ohio. This building represents the beginning of a now growing population of Vaisnavas, worshipers of Vishnu or Krishna, in Ohio who have integrated into the mainstream daily life here without forsaking their own unique traditions. Daily worship ceremonies, formally installed deities, marriage ceremonies, final rites, and many other significant ceremonies related to Vedic culture are practiced at the temple. These ceremonies are prevailed over by authorized Pujaris or priests. The ISKCON House upholds and represents those values sacred to Vedic culture: peacefulness, tolerance, equanimity, patience, truthfulness, honesty, austerity, and mercy. In this sacred place, there is no breaking of the regulative principles of Dharma (religion): no meat eating, no intoxication, no gambling, and no illicit sex (outside marriage).

717 E. 17th Avenue
Columbus

, OH

First held in Cincinnati in 1850, the Ohio State Fair was organized by the Ohio Board of Agriculture to promote agricultural education and recognize achievements. The second fair was held in Franklinton (now part of Columbus) on the farm of Michael Sullivant. To increase interest and participation during its early years, the Ohio State Fair traveled to various locations around Ohio. In 1874, Columbus won a bid to host the fair for a five-year trial period. The fair remained in Columbus after the trial period and was held at the Franklin County Fairgrounds until the 37th Ohio State Fair began at this location. Conveniently located adjacent to major railroad lines, the Ohio State Fair grounds were dedicated on August 31, 1886.

1700 E. 13th Street
Cleveland

, OH

The Council of International Programs USA (CIPUSA) promotes international understanding in global communities through professional development and cross-cultural exchange. CIPUSA evolved from the Cleveland International Program, a professional and cultural exchange program for youth leaders and social workers, established by Dr. Henry B. Ollendorff in 1956. By 2003, CIPUSA had grown to include nine affiliate offices nationwide, including two offices in Ohio, the Cleveland International Program and the Columbus International Program. Since its founding, CIPUSA has brought over 10,000 professionals for practical training from 147 countries. As a leader in international exchange CIPUSA continues Ollendorff’s vision–leading people to international training exchange programs in a variety of fields, including social services, business, and education.