Remarkable Ohio

Results for: higher-education
1350 Brush Row Road
Wilberforce

, OH

The son of an enslaved father and free Black mother, Martin Delany became one of the most prominent Black leaders in 19th Century America. Called the “Father of Black Nationalism,” Delany promoted African American pride and self-determination. Delany was born May 6, 1812 in present-day Charles Town, West Virginia. Because education for Blacks was illegal there, his family moved to Pennsylvania. Delany studied medicine, founded a newspaper, the “Mystery,” and advocated rights for African Americans and women. He co-edited the “North Star” with abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Delany risked his life by demanding equality and by aiding Americans of African descent in their fight from slavery to freedom. (Continued on other side)

791 Farmview Rd
Bidwell

, OH

The Village of Adamsville commemorates life in this area as it was during the early to mid-19th century. The original Adamsville settlement was located on the banks of Raccoon Creek, roughly one-half mile east of this site. Adam Rickabaugh (1761-1836), a veteran of the Revolutionary War from Virginia, brought his family to this valley around 1804. His patent for land along the creek was signed by President Thomas Jefferson and Secretary of State James Madison. Soon after his arrival, Rickabaugh built a grist mill, which became a meeting place for the growing community. In 1805, Nehemiah Wood, one of the earliest settlers in Gallia County, bought the mill from Rickabaugh, later adding a sawmill and a fulling mill for cleaning and thickening woolen cloth. (Continued on other side)

840 N Park Ave
Alliance

, OH

Born in Saginaw, Michigan in 1875, Mabel Hartzell moved to Alliance in 1883. She was adopted by Matthew and Mary Edwards Earley and then lived in this house until her death in 1954. A lifelong educator, she taught in the Alliance schools and served on the Board of Education. She also helped found the Alliance Historical Society, the Woman’s Club, Alliance Chapter of the American Red Cross, and the Alliance Area Retired Teachers Association. A dedicated public servant, she bestowed this house to the Alliance Historical Society.

W side of N Bickett Road, S of US 42
Wilberforce

, OH

Wilberforce University, founded at Tawawa Springs in 1856 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, is the first private historically black college or university in America. The inspirations for Wilberforce were an unwavering faith in God, an acknowledgement of the contribution of the British abolitionist and Member of Parliament William Wilberforce, the leadership of AME Bishop Daniel Payne, and the belief in the potential of all women and men to learn and prosper. Wilberforce embraces the love of learning and the use of education as a tool of personal and community empowerment. Wilberforce seeks to cultivate and meet the historic hunger for freedom and liberty of all people. Today, Wilberforce is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church and educates diverse students from across the nation and around the world. Wilberforce continues to serve as a beacon for learning and research.

50 Seminary Street
Berea

, OH

On this site the Lyceum Village and the Berea Seminary were established in 1837 by John Baldwin, James Gilruth, Henry O. Sheldon, and Josiah Holbrook. Their vision was to create the first in a connected series of Lyceum Villages. The Villages were designed especially to assist in the education of teachers, promote “scientific” exchanges over the world and thus encourage the study of the works and word of God, and cultivate the spirit of “peace on earth and good will to men.” The community, however, declined and in 1842, John Baldwin assumed the indebtedness of $15,000. James Wallace acquired the area. It was owned by the Methodist Children’s Home in the 1860s and then sold to German Wallace College in 1866, becoming the original German Wallace College campus.

Central College Road
New Albany

, OH

In 1820, Mark Evans, John Davis, and Jacob Waggoner acquired from Daniel Triplett an 18-rod-square parcel (approximately two acres) at this location on which to build the first school in Plain Township. Education was not publicly funded at the time and the first teacher, Jacob Smith, “kept” school for $1.50 per scholar. The fact that part of the school lot became a cemetery suggests that the log building was also used for church services, as was a log school a mile and a half east of here on Central College Road. (continued on other side)

Oberlin

, OH

Shortly after Oberlin Colony was established in 1833, a two-acre burying ground was set aside south of Plum Creek in the area bounded by Main, Morgan, and Professor streets. By 1861, however, with the town and Oberlin College growing and the Civil War escalating, the need for a larger cemetery became clear. After an extensive search, 27.5 acres of land belonging to Henry Safford were acquired one mile west of the center of Oberlin. H.B. Allen was hired to create a design in the style of the Rural Cemetery Movement, and in July 1864 Westwood Cemetery was formally dedicated. Burials in Westwood had actually begun in August 1863, and over the next few years hundreds of remains were reinterred from Oberlin’s “Old Cemetery” and from burying grounds in surrounding communities. In the mid-1860s the cemetery was enlarged to its present 47 acres, and in 2004 burials and memorials were estimated to number almost ten thousand. (Continued on other side)

201 West State Street
North Baltimore

, OH

The North Baltimore Elementary and High School stood at 124 S. Second St. and was dedicated November 11, 1927. The tan and brown brick building replaced a school (built 1884) that a fire destroyed on January 26, 1926. The new school building, for children in grades 1-12, also included classrooms for home economics and business courses, as well as a 900-seat auditorium (including balcony), second floor cafeteria, gymnasium, administrative offices, and a public library. E.E. Leidy was the school’s superintendent and R. Vern Northup was the high school principal. The members of the board of education were Dr. E.A. Powell, President, D.B. Bushey, Vice President, C.G. Nigh, Clerk, and Nellie Roberts and R.E. Simon. Previously known as the “Independents,” the school’s sports teams became the “Tigers” in 1931. (Continued on other side)