Remarkable Ohio

Results for: musicians
Fancher Cemetery, 11501 Fancher Road
Westerville

, OH

Field Musician Richard W. Thompson. Tunes played on fife and drum regulated a soldier’s life in camp and his actions on the battlefield. Heard over the roar of battle and through the haze of smoke, fifes and drums – field music – communicated orders to massed troops quickly. Richard Willoughby Thompson (c. 1742-1837), buried in Fancher Cemetery, was a field musician during the American Revolution and the War of 1812. According to his grandson Henry’s recollections from the 1920s, Thompson was born in Dublin, Ireland, and enlisted in the British army, where his service culminated in his capture while picking blackberries. He switched allegiances, joined the colonials, and was sent to Virginia. Thompson was appointed the Fife Major of the 5th Virginia Regiment and remained a Fife Major as Virginia units organized during the war. (Continued on other side)

161 Tuscora Avenue NW
New Philadelphia

, OH

Tuscora Park, on land once owned by Jeremiah Reeves, opened as a private amusement park on June 1, 1907. Despite rain, the grand opening brought thousands of visitors to the park. Throughout the summer months, large crowds enjoyed such features as a swimming pool, sea wave, restaurant, dancing pavilion, and twice-daily free band concerts. The park also featured athletic facilities for running, tennis, baseball, and bowling. After Tuscora Park was sold in a November 1911 Sheriff’s sale, New Philadelphia’s City Council authorized its purchase along with additional surrounding acreage and received the deeds on June 21, 1912. Originally billed as the “Coney Island of Eastern Ohio,” Tuscora continues to operate as a city-owned park that draws both local residents and visitors to its picnic grounds, vintage rides, swimming pool, and athletic facilities. (Continued on other side)

250 East Market Street
Akron

, OH

On May 1, 1950, the Akron Community Service Center and Urban League building opened to the public. The Center was a gathering place for African Americans of the community, where they addressed workplace, education, and other issues dividing the city. Directors included the late George W. Thompson, Raymond Brown and Vernon L. Odom. The Center provided space for meetings, classes and receptions and had a swimming pool and gymnasium. The Center also hosted talent shows, which included the musicians who became Ruby and the Romantics. The group scored a #1 hit in 1963 with “Our Day Will Come.”

2210 Summit Street
Columbus

, OH

2210 Summit Street once housed one of Ohio’s longest-running lesbian bars. In 1970, a lesbian bartender at Jack’s A Go Go recognized that while Columbus had bars for gay men, it needed one geared toward lesbian clientele. Patrons knew the bar as “Jack’s,” Logan’s Off Broadway, and Summit Station. Staff welcomed women from small towns, women working in trades, women of color, butch/femme lesbians, and transgender people. Regulars recall that stepping through the door felt like finally entering a place of true belonging. Women could dance, “get together,” break up, sing karaoke, party with friends, and celebrate birthdays and holidays. Summit Station remained a safe public space, despite ongoing police harassment of its gender non-conforming regulars. A sign posted outside declared: “Ladies Night, Every Night. Men $5.” (Continued on other side)