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3186 County Road 550
Frankfort

, OH

Typical of many schoolhouses in the Frankfort area during the 1800s, this school, with its pot-bellied stove and flip-top desks, was part of the public school system of that era. The building and its contents have been restored by the citizens of Frankfort in conjunction with the Budd Company.

21 W. Main Street
Chillicothe

, OH

On this site, on January 4-7, 1808, the six Masonic lodges then existent in the state met and formed the Grand Lodge of Ohio. General Rufus Putnam of Marietta was elected the first Grand Master. Because of advanced age and failing health, he declined the honor and Governor Samuel Huntington was named in his stead.

2 N. Paint Street
Chillicothe

, OH

Ross County’s first courthouse was Ohio’s first statehouse. The courthouse was erected on the Public Square in 1801. Thomas Worthington, one of the building’s superintendents, laid out the foundation. Chillicothe was the last capital of the Northwest Territory, and the final session of the territorial legislature met in the courthouse in 1801. Ohio’s first constitution was written here in 1802. On March 1, 1803, Ohio’s first General Assembly convened in the building, making it the statehouse. During a time of strained relations between Native Americans and settlers in Ohio, the great Shawnee leader Tecumseh delivered a speech here in 1807 to reassure citizens that the Indians would remain peaceful. The courthouse served as the statehouse from 1803 to 1810 and from 1812 to 1816. The building was razed in 1852 to make way for the present courthouse.

W of Main Street and Church Street Intersection
South Salem

, OH

Presbyterian minister Hugh Stewart Fullerton asked his congregation in 1841: “Shall we endeavor to form an academy to provide better educational advantages to the young citizens of this remote community?” Predating the founding of the town of South Salem, the Salem Academy was built and opened in 1842, its stone coming from a quarry south of Greenfield. Its primary purpose was to prepare ministers and teachers for the West. Professor J.A. Lowes served as principal during the “golden age” of the academy from 1848 to 1858. (continued on other side)

50 W. Main Street
Chillicothe

, OH

The oldest commercial enterprise in Ohio, the Chillicothe Gazette began publication on April 25, 1800, as Freeman’s Journal and Chillicothe Advertiser. That October it became the Scioto Gazette, and Chillicothe has had a Gazette ever since. It is the oldest newspaper in continuous operation west of the Allegheny Mountains, and the second oldest in the United States. Its first publisher and editor, Nathaniel Willis, was a Revolution-era Boston printer who reputedly apprenticed under Benjamin Franklin. Under his leadership the Gazette became one of the most influential papers in the expanding West. It first reported news transmitted by telegraph in 1847 and began daily publication in 1849. The Gazette moved into this building, a replica of Ohio’s first statehouse, in 1941.

90 W. Sixth Street, Lucy Hayes Heritage Center
Chillicothe

, OH

First Lady Lucy Ware Webb Hayes was born in this four-room Federal Vernacular house in 1831. Well educated for her time, she attended local schools, took classes in the preparatory department of Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, and graduated from Wesleyan Female College in Cincinnati in 1850. She married lawyer and future U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1852. They raised five children to adulthood. As a colonel’s wife during the Civil War, “Mother Lucy” boosted morale for the soldiers of the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiment. In 1870, during Hayes’ first term as governor of Ohio, Lucy helped establish the Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home as a state institution. (continued on other side)

Camp Sherman Memorial Park, SR 104
Chillicothe

, OH

The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917. Largely through the efforts of Chillicothe attorney John Poland, the War Department selected Chillicothe as the site of an army training camp for inductees from Ohio, West Virginia, and western Pennsylvania. Construction began at Camp Sherman, named for Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman, in June 1917. When the first recruits arrived in September, more than fourteen thousand workers had erected two thousand buildings on the 1,700-acre site. The rapid influx of soldiers increased Chillicothe’s population from 16,000 to 60,000.

Chillicothe

, OH

Situated on land owned by Thomas Worthington, Camp Bull was a stockade constructed in this vicinity to confine British prisoners of war during the War of 1812. When Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry defeated the British fleet on Lake Erie on September 10, 1813, he captured more than 300 seaman. After they were landed on the Ohio shore, General William Henry Harrison, the commander of the American Army of the Northwest, ordered the prisoners marched to Chillicothe for confinement. The prisoners were placed in a two-acre encampment surrounded by cabins on three sides with a picketed wall on the fourth, which faced the banks of the Scioto River. The camp derived its name from “John Bull,” a common reference for all Englishmen. The prisoners remained at Chillicothe until July 16, 1814. Before leaving, they witnessed the execution by firing squad of six American soldiers who had been found guilty of desertion.