Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=870e4b5caf37713b00939a9fea60713c&swpmtxnonce=06e7076ea0/6/&urban-historic-district
SE corner of Court Street and Union Street
Athens

, OH

Manasseh Cutler, Rufus Putnam, Winthrop Sargeant, and Benjamin Tupper of the Ohio Company conceived Ohio University, which was encouraged by the Ordinance of 1787 and the Northwest Territorial Legislature in 1799, incorporated as the American Western University in 1802, and chartered by the Ohio State Legislature on February 18, 1804. The university is the first institution of higher learning in the Northwest Territory, second west of the Allegheny Mountains, and the first in the United States to be endowed with land by the government with proceeds used to pay for its operations-revenue from two townships was set aside to support the university. Opened on June 1, 1809, as an academy with three students, Ohio University awarded its first undergraduate degrees in 1815.

300 N. Front Street
Ripley

, OH

Ripley was incorporated as the village of Staunton in 1812. Its name was changed in 1816 to honor General Eleazer Wheelock Ripley, a hero of the War of 1812. In the years before railroads, Ripley was a principal Ohio River shipping center. Also important were its extensive boat-building, tobacco, pork, and timber industries. Ripley too was the home of saw and planing mills, iron foundries, and a piano factory. Such varied commerce enabled Ripley to remain vibrant throughout the nineteenth century. Although noted as a port, Ripley is best remembered as an abolitionist stronghold. Many of its citizens, including Rev. John Rankin and John P. Parker, served as conductors on the famed “Underground Railroad.” The notoriety of Ripley’s anti-slavery network perhaps eclipsed that of nearby Cincinnati, earning the town a reputation as the “Black Hole of Abolitionism.” (Continued on side two)

W of Main Street and Church Street Intersection
South Salem

, OH

Presbyterian minister Hugh Stewart Fullerton asked his congregation in 1841: “Shall we endeavor to form an academy to provide better educational advantages to the young citizens of this remote community?” Predating the founding of the town of South Salem, the Salem Academy was built and opened in 1842, its stone coming from a quarry south of Greenfield. Its primary purpose was to prepare ministers and teachers for the West. Professor J.A. Lowes served as principal during the “golden age” of the academy from 1848 to 1858. (continued on other side)

230 Ramsey Street
College Corner

, OH

In 1893, Ohio and Indiana constructed the first Union School on the state line separating Ohio and Indiana. For 111 years, students from both states have been educated in what is the only schoolhouse located in Ohio and Indiana. In 1925, a new Union School was designed to replace the old schoolhouse. The dedication of this new school building took place on December 21, 1926. A new addition was added in 2004. The Union School Building has special architectural features such as a center stone placed on the Ohio and Indiana state line and Ohio and Indiana arched doorways. The bell from the 1893 Union School is displayed to the south side of the current school.

New Boston

, OH

A native of New Boston, Vernal G. Riffe Jr. served the 92nd House District in the Ohio General Assembly from 1959 to 1994. As Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives from 1974 through 1994, he served longer than any other speaker in the state’s history. Widely regarded as Ohio’s most influential legislator of the late 20th century, Riffe, a Democrat, built effective political alliances across party lines. A powerful advocate for southern Ohio, he was instrumental in the growth and expansion of Shawnee State University.

90 North Street
Clifton

, OH

This historic village was a hub for early Ohio industry and travel. The natural geography of the area provided ideal conditions for the establishment of a variety of mills. Col. Robert Patterson, an ancestor of the founder of National Cash Register in Dayton, John Patterson, chose Clifton for the site of a woolen mill, which furnished material for the American army during the War of 1812. Davis Mill, established in 1802 and in operation today as Clifton Mill, produced meal and flour for Civil War troops. A major stop on the stagecoach trail, “The Accommodation Line,” which ran from Springfield to Cincinnati from 1827 to 1840, the village bustled with the commotion of travelers. The once flourishing industry of Clifton faded as railroad traffic bypassed the village and manufacturers left the area.

Park on Main Street/OH 125
Decatur

, OH

Originally called St. Clairsville and platted in 1801, Decatur was named for early 19th century naval hero Stephen Decatur. It is among the oldest villages in Brown County, which before 1817 was a part of Adams County. Among its notable early residents were Nathaniel Beasley (1774-1835), the first surveyor of Adams County, and Sarah Boone Montgomery (1763-1848), a heroine of the border wars in Kentucky. Decatur and Byrd Township supported at least four known stations on the Underground Railroad. Many area residents helped conduct escaping slaves northward to freedom.

318 Main Street
Coshocton

, OH

In 1764, Colonel Henry Bouquet established the site of what is now Coshocton. In 1811, the county was founded and the town incorporated as the county seat. The Coshocton County Courthouse, the third on this site, was built between 1873 and 1875 by contractors Carpenter and Williams of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The Second Empire structure features a five-story tower containing a four-faced clock and the bell from the previous 1824 courthouse. The courthouse contains a notable mural by artist Arthur William Woelfle depicting the signing of Bouquet’s treaty with the Indians near the Walhonding River in November 1764. The Coshocton County Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.