Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=a17b03f100564038830e2329f9079f4e&swpmtxnonce=58e942765e/25/&public-schools
1573 E. 214th Street
Euclid

, OH

Japanese-American Buddhists, who resettled in the Cleveland area in 1943-44 after being released from World War II internment camps, established the oldest continually meeting Buddhist organization in Ohio. The organization was originally known as the Cleveland Young Buddhist Association and is now known as the Cleveland Buddhist Temple. Services were held in members’ homes until a building on East 81st Street was purchased in 1955. After extensive damage to the building during the Hough riots in 1966, the Temple’s current residence was acquired in 1968. Affiliated with the Buddhist Churches of America, the Temple serves the Jodo Shinshu Tradition of Buddhism. In 1979, the Temple under the direction of Sensei Koshin Ogui introduced the Zen Shin meditation practice in response to public wishes. The Temple welcomes all those wishing to study the teachings of the Buddha.

2820 Gilbert Avenue
Cincinnati

, OH

The Lanes, Baptist merchants from New Orleans, and the Kempers, a Presbyterian family from Cincinnati, gave money and land respectively for Cincinnati’s first manual labor theological seminary and high school, which opened in suburban Walnut Hills in 1829. The Reverend Lyman Beecher came from Boston as its first president. The president’s house, now known as the Stowe House after Beecher’s daughter Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, still remains at Gilbert and Foraker. Lane Theological Seminary, bound by present day Gilbert, Chapel, Park, and Yale streets, continued to educate Presbyterian ministers until 1932, when it was merged with McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago.

2726 Johnstone Place
Cincinnati

, OH

Mary Harlan Doherty was born in 1862 in the Dayton Street neighborhood of Cincinnati. She graduated from Woodward High School in 1880 at a time when women were not expected to go to college, but rather to marry, raise children, and take care of household duties. Miss Doherty, as she was known, saw the world differently. She felt strongly that women should not only possess solid social skills, but also be prepared for college. She graduated from Cornell University in 1899. In 1906 she established the College Preparatory School for Girls in the former home of Superior Court Judge and Ohio Governor George Hoadley, with a class of 125 students. Enrollment doubled by 1920, with Miss Doherty guiding her students under the school’s motto, Ad Summum, meaning “To the Highest Point,” or, as she viewed it, to strive for excellence, hard work, and service.

Just E of 12036 Sylvania-Metamora Rd
Berkey

, OH

According to fellow World War II veteran and U.S. Senator Bob Dole, Roger T. Durbin was “the public persona—the beacon—of the drive to build a National World War II Memorial in our nation’s capital.” It started with a conversation between Mr. Durbin and Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur at a local fish fry in February 1987. Enlisting Kaptur’s support, the work to create the memorial began. Described as a “gentleman with a square jaw, twinkling eyes, and churlish grin,” Mr. Durbin committed himself to serving others. He was a rural letter carrier, Richfield Township trustee, and coached Little League baseball. He was a veteran of the Tenth Armored (Tiger) Division and saw action at the Battle of the Bulge. The National WWII Memorial was dedicated May 29, 2004. Although Mr. Durbin did not live to see that day, his determination is the reason it stands.

2320 E 30th Street
Cleveland

, OH

John Malvin (1795-1880) was an operative on the Underground Railroad and an ardent member of anti-slavery and abolitionist causes. Born in Dumfries, Virginia of a free mother and enslaved father, Malvin was apprenticed at an early age to learn carpentry and taught himself to read and write. In 1827, he moved to Cincinnati where he became an ordained preacher and an activist in the cause of freedom. In 1831, with his wife Harriet, he moved to Cleveland where he became a charter member of the First Baptist Church, a sawmill operator, and captain and owner of the canal boat Auburn. (continued on other side)

1310 Sycamore Street
Cincinnati

, OH

William and Abigail Cutter Woodward founded Woodward High School, the first public high school west of the Allegheny Mountains, on this site October 24, 1831. Concerned that the poor of Cincinnati had no avenues for education, the Woodwards donated land, time, funding, and expertise to this venture that brought the arts and sciences to “those who have not the means of procuring such advantages themselves.” Notables include Dr. Joseph Ray, principal, 1851-1855, author of several popular mathematics texts; Professor William McGuffey, author of the well-known readers and spellers; and William Howard Taft, Class of 1874, former U.S. President. From 1856-1863, the home of Levi and Catherine Coffin was also located on this site. Both were legendary abolitionishts who helped enslaved people escape to freedom in Canada. Levi is often referred to as the “President of the Underground Railroad.”

5220 N. High Street
Columbus

, OH

In 1835, Dr. William Awl of Columbus and Dr. Daniel Drake of Cincinnati presented recommendations to the Ohio General Assembly to establish a school for the blind. Legislation, signed by then governor of Ohio Duncan McArthur on April 3, 1837, provided funding to create the first state-supported residential school for the blind in the United States. The Institution for the Education of the Blind opened July 4, 1837, with five students. A year later, the first permanent structure, housing 60 students, was built on a nine-acre tract of land on the eastern edge of the city, and that was followed in 1874 with a larger facility near Fulton and Main streets. The school was honored and recognized in 1937 as being one of the finest schools for the blind in the country. In 1953, a new school for the blind was built at its present location at 5220 North High Street.

300 Front Street/OH 237
Berea

, OH

In 1845, Baldwin Institute, one of the first schools in the area open to all students regardless of gender, race, or creed, was chartered. The wealth generated by the sandstone and grindstone industries of Berea allowed John Baldwin to found the school. Ten years later, officials rechartered the school and renamed it Baldwin University. By the 1880s, the expanding quarries began to encroach on the original campus of the university, forcing it to relocate. In 1891, ground was broken for the new campus at the corner of Front Street and Bagley Road. Recitation Hall, renamed Wheeler Hall, was the first new building, followed by the Philura Gould Baldwin Memorial Library in 1894. In 1905, through the funding of the Carnegie Foundation, the Ladies Hall, renamed Carnegie Hall, was moved stone by stone to the new campus to serve as the science building. Baldwin University merged with German-Wallace College in 1913 to become Baldwin-Wallace College.