Remarkable Ohio

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301 Grant St
Dennison

, OH

From its founding in 1865, Dennison was a railroad town and became the second largest rail center for the Pennsylvania Railroad. Rail presence was so strong that the industry dictated social and economic development throughout the community. For example, the Railway Chapel, the historic name for the First Presbyterian Church of Dennison was built because W.W. Card, Pennsylvania Railroad Superintendent, saw a spiritual need in the community. As the first church built in Dennison, Card contacted the Presbytery of Steubenville to start the church, arranged for donation of land, provided for financing from railway officials, and arranged for labor and material from the railroad. Railroad workers constructed the furnishing for the church with walnut pews built by the Dennison Car Shops. The pews have reversible backs, designed after ones in passenger cars. The church was dedicated in April 1871 and listed on the National Register of Historical Places in 2009.

441 Norton Road
Columbus

, OH

There are 48 known members of the Postle family buried in the cemetery. Their stories are interwoven with the history of Prairie Township, Franklin County, and Ohio. In 1810, Shadrach and Anna Stacia Postle were among the first settlers of Prairie Township. Their son Job was a veteran of the War of 1812 and later owned the Checker Inn, a popular stopping place on the National Road. In the 1860s, Smith Postle and his son, William Sylvester Postle, were some of the first manufacturers of clay drainage tile in Ohio. Their products improved drainage in farm fields and fostered the growth of the tile industry in the state. Gabriel Postle was the first Postle buried in the cemetery in 1829. Twelve graves are of children under the age of six, which testifies to the hardships endured by the area’s early residents. Other graves include those of John Whitehurst, a freed slave who lived with the family of the Job Postle and John Tracy, a veteran of the Civil War. In 1870, Nancy Postle was the last person buried in the cemetery.

6975 Ridge Road
Parma

, OH

This 48-acre farm is the last remnant of an agricultural way of life that characterized Parma Township well into the 20th century. The farmhouse, built circa 1855 by Western Reserve settler Lyman Stearns, is representative of the Greek Revival style of architecture popular in this region prior to the Civil War. The “Yankee” style barn predates the house. Suburban development following World War II engulfed virtually all of this area by the 1950s. The Stearns Homestead was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. (continued on other side)

7800 W US 36
St. Paris

, OH

Albert B. “A.B.” Graham was born in Champaign County on March 13, 1868, the son of Joseph and Esther Graham. He was raised in a small rural home, but a fire destroyed the house in 1879, and the family moved to Lena where Graham attended local schools, graduating at age 17. After attending the National Normal University in Lebanon, he returned to Champaign County where he taught, then became principal, and later an innovative superintendent. Graham also was enthusiastic about teaching children the values of rural and farm living and while teaching developed a youth agricultural club, which eventually became known as the 4-H Club. In July 1905 Graham became the superintendent of Agricultural Extension at the Ohio State University. The Graham School District near Lena was named for A.B. Graham. He delivered the dedication speech at Graham High School in December 1957 and said that schools were meant to build “human souls.”

5648 W. Chapel Road
Madison

, OH

Originally a horse barn owned and converted by the Klump family, Rabbit Run Theater opened in 1946. In its early years, Rabbit Run operated as a professional summer stock theater and many well-known actors such as Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn, Jim Backus, Dustin Hoffman, Charles Grodin, and Sandy Dennis graced its boards. Sadly, the theater closed in 1967 and remained dark until 1979 when a group of local theater lovers reopened the “barn” as a community theater. Rabbit Run Theater is one of only a few converted barn theaters still in operation today.

57 W North Street
Akron

, OH

The Mustill house and store are survivors of Akron’s canal era and date to the 1840s. Joseph and Sarah Mustill moved their family from England to Akron in 1833 and owned the store and Greek Revival house at Lock 15 on the Ohio & Erie Canal. Three generations of Mustills lived and worked the grocery business at Lock 15, first Joseph and Sarah, then their son Fred with his wife Emma, and their children Maria, Frederick, Edwin and Franklin. A popular place to buy or barter goods, the store served canallers, farmers, craftsmen, and neighbors for many years.

123 S Broad Street
Canfield

, OH

The Canfield Christian Church began as a Baptist congregation in 1822 and church met for worship in William Dean’s home. The Mahoning Baptist Association Meeting of 1826 was held in David Hayes barn. In 1827, Walter Scott was asked by the Association to be the first paid traveling evangelist in the Mahoning Valley area of Ohio. Scott accepted the offer and moved his family to a house next to the Canfield Church. By June of 1829, the Canfield Church voted to lay aside the Baptist name for the name Disciples of Christ. They believed all creeds were unnecessary and took the Bible alone as their sole rule of faith and practice. In 1847, a new church was built. Charter members of the church include James and Sarah Caldwell, Ann Winfield, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Caldwell and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Flick, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Clark, Mr. and Mrs. John Flick, and Mr. and Mrs. Simmon Sackett and daughter. (Continued on other side)

State Route 2 and OH-358
Port Clinton

, OH

This location marks the site where the first Ohio State Highway Patrol cadet class graduated on November 15, 1933. Known as the Camp Perry School, Colonel Lynn Black opened the training on October 3, 1933, after House Bill 270 created the Division. Colonel Black received over 5,000 applications for the inaugural class, which was trimmed to approximately 125 individuals who formed the first training class. The Ohio National Guard graciously volunteered the use of this facility for the training. The newly formed Highway Patrol purchased 54 new motorcycles to be used for patrol duties. Many of the cadets had no prior experience operating motorcycles and had to be trained in short order. Cadets faced extreme adversity, including frigid temperatures and a lack of heating in the facilities. Severe weather shortened training for the cadets. The first class of 60 new Patrolmen graduated on November 15, 1933.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol’s core values are instilled into all new recruits and continually reinforced. They are the foundation upon which a trooper can be a consummate public servant; Adaptability, Attention to Detail, Diversity, Family, Honesty, Officer Safety, Performance Driven, Professionalism, Self-Discipline, Sense of Urgency and Team Oriented.