Remarkable Ohio

Results for: swpmtx=870e4b5caf37713b00939a9fea60713c&swpmtxnonce=06e7076ea0/6/&urban-historic-district
103 Jefferson Street
Greenfield

, OH

The Smith Tannery is the oldest original structure remaining in Greenfield. Built in 1821 by Revolutionary War veteran William Smith and his son Samuel, the tannery became a noted station on the fabled “Underground Railroad.” The structure, which also served as the family residence, was the birthplace of Dr. Samuel M. Smith, Surgeon General of Ohio during the Civil War, and Dr. William R. Smith, who personally notified Abraham Lincoln of his nomination to the presidency in 1864. The Smiths were active members of the Abolition Society of Paint Valley, which was established in 1833 in Greenfield and reorganized in 1836 as the Greenfield Anti-Slavery Society. In 1844, the Society assisted the efforts of Frederick Douglass, one of the nation’s leading abolitionists. The Society provided an important junction on the Underground Railroad, assisting many fugitive slaves to gain freedom, including, it is said, Eliza Jane Harris of Uncle Tom’s Cabin fame. The Smith Tannery was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

115 N. Williams Street
Paulding

, OH

Named for John Paulding, a Revolutionary War soldier whose capture of a British spy implicated Benedict Arnold in treason, Paulding County was formed in 1820 from the last remaining unorganized area of Ohio. Sparsely settled, it remained under the jurisdiction of Wood County until 1824 and then Williams County until 1839. Paulding’s first county seat was established at New Rochester in 1839, then moved to Charloe in 1841. Neither village exists today. Centrally-located Paulding Center became the county seat in 1851, and a courthouse was built the following year. The present courthouse, built during the region’s timber boom of the late 19th century, was designed by architect Edward Oscar Fallis and patterned after his Lenawee County courthouse in Adrian, Michigan. The four-faced Romanesque style building was completed in 1888 at a cost of $40,000. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

17510 Road 8-P
Columbus Grove

, OH

The construction of Putnam County’s first public swimming pool helped Columbus Grove weather the Great Depression of the 1930s. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration (WPA) and the Village of Columbus Grove planned the pool to provide much-needed jobs and recreational facilities for the residents of Putnam County. Between the fall of 1935 and 1936, local men (and two women) built the pool and shelter house by hand from rock quarried on site. The workers were not trained stone masons or cutters. Befitting their limited skills, the pool was built in a simplified Norman Revival/Rustic architectural style. Wages ranged from $.33 to $.55 per hour. The pool’s grand opening was July 1, 1937. That first year, adults paid $.25 to swim, and children were charged $.10. The Columbus Grove Municipal Pool was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.

5 S. Mechanic Street (OH 60)
Hayesville

, OH

This building was a center of community life from the time of its construction in 1886 to the late 1930s. Once common, such combinations of governmental offices and commercial and entertainment space are today rare. The second floor opera house retains many original features, including stage backdrops, dressing rooms, and seats. Vaudeville, theater companies, and entertainment of all kinds were hosted here and many performers signed the backstage walls: Buffalo Bill dated his signature October 28, 1888. Along with village offices, first floor tenants have included the Vermillion Township Trustees, the Eddie Stover Hat Shop, and the F.L. Smith Watch Repair and Jewelry Store. Hayesville’s citizens approved the hall’s construction on April 18, 1884 by a vote of 100 to 13. Contractor Samuel Craig completed the building two years later at a cost of $4,852.20. Located on the Lincoln Highway, this building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

E. Center Street
Germantown

, OH

Restored in 1963, the Germantown Covered Bridge on East Center Street, spanning Little Twin Creek, was 93 years old and is reputed to be the only existing covered bridge of its kind in the world. For 41 years this unique inverted bow string truss covered bridge spanned Little Twin Creek on the Dayton Pike in Germantown, Ohio. In 1911 it was removed to its present location where it has been restored and beautified as a link with Ohio’s early history. It is a symbol of individual initiative in America’s early history.

223 Main Street
Chardon

, OH

This block of Main Street overlooks the Geauga County Courthouse, which was built in 1869. The courthouse and the Main Street buildings, together which compose a district that has been entered on the National Register of Historic Places, are excellent examples of the High Victorian Italianate architectural style. Going north from Court Street, the first two buildings were erected in 1873. The Opera House dates from 1875. The jail was constructed in 1868 just after the fire, followed by the new jail of 1874, and the sheriff’s house of 1909. Memorial Hall (now the Courthouse Annex) dates from 1875. Last on the block is the Victorian Gothic Church built in 1882,

223 Main Street
Chardon

, OH

This block of Main Street overlooks the Geauga County Courthouse, which was built in 1869. The courthouse and the Main Street buildings, together which compose a district that has been entered on the National Register of Historic Places, are excellent examples of the High Victorian Italianate architectural style. Going north from Court Street, the first two buildings were erected in 1873. The Opera House dates from 1875. The jail was constructed in 1868 just after the fire, followed by the new jail of 1874, and the sheriff’s house of 1909. Memorial Hall (now the Courthouse Annex) dates from 1875. Last on the block is the Victorian Gothic Church built in 1882,

Early Settlers Burying Ground Cemetery, N. Main Street
Bethel

, OH

Resting here among other pioneers are: Obed Denham, native of Plainfield, New Jersey, donor of this plot, founder of Bethel in 1798, and pioneer abolitionist; Thomas Morris, antislavery leader, veteran state legislator, U.S. senator 1833-1839, and Liberty Party vice presidential nominee 1844; Reader Wright Clarke, U.S. representative from the Clermont District 1865-1869, and U.S. Treasury second auditor 1869-1870; “The Unknown Hunter”; befriended by Obed Denham and the first person buried in this hallowed ground.